mvc display pdf from byte array : Convert pdf to jpg file application control tool html web page windows online FinalReportJun09-e1-part1417

Page 9 
THE TEN-YEAR LEGISLATIVE REVIEW OF 
EXPORT DEVELOPMENT CANADA: 
WHERE WE ARE AND WHERE WE NEED TO BE  
INTRODUCTION 
Export Development Canada (EDC) is a federal Crown corporation mandated under the Export 
Development Act to “support and develop, directly and indirectly, Canada‟s export trade and 
Canadian capacity to engage in that trade and to respond to international business opportunities.”
1
In particular, it offers short-, medium- and long-term credit insurance; it also provides financial 
services, bonding and guarantees, political risk insurance, direct loans to buyers and lines of 
credit in other countries to encourage buyers to purchase Canadian products. 
This study by the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade is part 
of the legislatively mandated ten-year review of the Export Development Act.
2
The objective of 
the review is to assess how EDC is evolving, and should continue to evolve, to address the 
competitive demands of international trade on behalf of its stakeholders, and to make 
recommendations where appropriate. 
In compliance with its legislative obligations, the committee examined the report commissioned 
by the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and carried out by International 
Financial Consulting Inc. (IFC), entitled The Legislative Review of Export Development Canada 
which was released in December 2008 and tabled in the Senate on February 10, 2009. In carrying 
out the study, the committee held six meetings in March 2009 and heard from twelve witnesses. 
We also received several written submissions.  
Canada continues to depend on trade and, without a doubt, EDC plays a valuable role in 
promoting Canadian trade and international commercial interests. Its value cannot be overstated 
in light of the significance of trade for Canada‟s economy. With exports of goods and services 
representing 34.5 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2008, trade plays a vital role in the 
Canadian economy. Merchandise exports amounted to $484 billion in 2008, an increase of $33 
billion from the previous year. Furthermore, service exports amounted to $67 billion in 2006 (the 
most recent data available), a slight increase from the previous year.
3
The committee undertook this study under exceptional circumstances. The economic downturn 
was taking hold and, as part of its response, the Government of Canada introduced its 2009 
Budget that announced a temporary expansion in EDC‟s mandate. Moreover, following the 
conclusion of the committee‟s consultations, in May 2009, the Minister of Finance increased 
1
Export Development Act (R.S., 1985, c. E-20), available at  http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/E-20/index.html
.  
2
The Export Development Act required an initial review of the legislation five years after adoption, followed by a 
ten-year review. The first review was carried out in 1998 by Gowling, Strathy and Henderson, and the Act was 
subsequently studied by the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce. The committee‟s report 
was tabled March 2000 and a federal response was released in June 2000. 
3
Data are from Statistics Canada and the OECD Economic Outlook. 
Convert pdf to jpg file - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
changing pdf to jpg; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
Convert pdf to jpg file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf document to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter
Page 10 
EDC‟s long- and short-term borrowing limits from $7 billion to $9 billion and from $6 billion to 
$8 billion, respectively, in order to meet the increased demands for its services.  As a result, 
developments directly affecting EDC were unfolding in real time during the course of our 
consultations, a situation that has affected the pertinence of this report. At the appropriate time, 
we  intend to study more comprehensively EDC‟s expanded mandate. 
In this context, the report summarizes the testimony that was presented to the committee and 
provides our comments on EDC‟s current and newly assigned operations. It also offers 
recommendations that we believe will improve EDC‟s operations and the future competitiveness 
of Canada‟s exporters. 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the
change pdf file to jpg; convert pdf to jpeg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf image to jpg online; convert pdf file to jpg on
Page 11 
THE CHANGING GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT 
AND EDC’S VALUE IN IT 
A. What the Witnesses Said 
Any effort to ascertain the value and appropriateness of EDC‟s mandate must begin with an 
assessment of the context in which it and Canadian businesses operate. In this respect, the 
committee notes the tremendous changes in the global environment and the structure of world 
trade that have occurred since the last review of EDC. Several witnesses alluded to these changes, 
which can be categorised according to how firms interact with each other, the emergence of new 
markets in the global economy and the worldwide economic slowdown. 
There was general consensus among the committee‟s witnesses that the nature of international 
business now reflects less national-based processes and more global supply chains or integrative 
trade.
4
Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters emphasised that, to be successful, Canadian 
businesses have to operate in a manner that reflects a global supply chain that sources parts and 
inputs from different parts of the world: “It is not just really making a product; it is delivering 
value to your clients through a tangible good.”
5
In its testimony to the committee, the Automotive Parts Manufacturers‟ Association described the 
integrated manufacturing process for the auto sector: “[I]t is not unusual for a part to cross those 
borders six or seven times before a vehicle arrives at the dealer lot from which it is sold.”
6
Furthermore, according to IFC, the intellectual property and design of a product are becoming 
increasingly important aspects of international trade: “[I]t is no longer a case of „made in‟ or even 
„made by‟ but rather it is „conceived by‟ or „designed by.‟ In other words, the intellectual 
property of companies and the value creation is about the designing.”
7
Moreover, the emergence of new markets in the global economy, including Brazil, China, India 
and Russia, has generated new opportunities and challenges for export-oriented Canadian 
businesses. According to Dessau Inc, Canadian companies need to be more aggressive and 
creative in order to meet the challenge of a more competitive playing field.   
International competition has heated up considerably and the 
massive entry of China, India and Brazil into developing countries 
has altered the landscape. They are taking very impressive steps to 
set up for the long term in African, Asian and Latin American 
markets. They are seriously threatening Canadian presence in these 
markets. We need to get off the beaten path, do more and better, 
4
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 4, pp. 5-6.  
5
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 4, p. 21. 
6
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 4, p. 29. 
7
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 2, p. 10. 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
convert pdf image to jpg; c# convert pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc. PowerPoint.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
convert pdf page to jpg; convert .pdf to .jpg
Page 12 
otherwise as Canadians, we will be out of these very important 
markets.
8
The global economic slowdown has also affected the environment in which EDC and Canadian 
businesses operate. The committee is concerned about the impact on Canadian businesses of the 
dramatic economic slowdown in the United States, Canada‟s primary trading partner, and the 
reduced availability of credit, a vital element for any business. As the committee heard from the 
Canadian Bankers Association, “[T]here is no doubt that there is a credit problem. We have had 
large sections of what have formerly been active lenders either shrunk down, not growing as 
much or completely pulled out, so there is a need for more credit.”
9
The impact of reduced financing for Canadian businesses and for the economy is potentially 
devastating, particularly as exports account for over one-fifth of Canada‟s gross national product 
(GNP) and manufacturers are responsible for two-thirds of Canada‟s exports.
10
A significant 
number of witnesses reinforced this view, including the Forest Products Association of Canada:  
[C]redit is a necessary precondition for business working. Credit is 
like oxygen. You can be competitive, brilliant, have great markets 
and good profit margins. If you cannot get credit, if you cannot 
renew credit, if your suppliers cannot get credit, if your customers 
cannot get credit, business does not happen. … This is absolutely 
vital.
11
Some Canadian businesses access EDC‟s resources and expertise as they seek to operate in the 
challenging and changing economic environment. EDC‟s ability to respond to a changing 
environment is due, in part, to an expansion in its overseas representation, particularly in 
emerging economies such as China, India and Russia. Indeed, the relative importance of 
emerging economies as trading partners for all Organization for Economic Co-operation and 
Development (OECD) countries is increasing. As a result, international representation is a 
necessary component of competitiveness for Canadian businesses. Such a presence is imperative 
as export credit agencies of other countries have a strong presence in foreign countries and 
promote their national business interests, at times resulting in a competitive disadvantage for 
Canadian exporters.  
These export credit agencies, and their foreign offices, are proliferating overseas, as stated in 
IFC‟s presentation to the committee.
12
Dessau Inc. also supported the value of EDC‟s 
international presence: 
Opening EDC offices abroad is a step in this direction, and 
hopefully there will be many more. Competition among export 
support agencies has become very fierce. Furthermore, we should 
8
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 4, p. 45. 
9
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 3, p. 79. 
10
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 4, p. 19. 
11
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 3, p. 63. 
12
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 2, p. 23. 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C# Create PDF from Raster Images, .NET Graphics and REImage File with XDoc Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
change pdf to jpg format; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Turn multipage PDF file into image files in .NET WinForm application. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET.
reader pdf to jpeg; change from pdf to jpg
Page 13 
not hesitate to copy our competitors when they do something 
good.
13
A similar point was made by the Conference Board of Canada: “We have to become much more 
aggressive, knowing that countries like China or India will be the dominant growth markets for 
the world economy for the next ten years. Certainly, the EDC has signalled their understanding of 
that. They are opening offices in these markets and trying to build more capacity.”
14
The Automotive Parts Manufacturers‟ Association concurred with this positive assessment of 
EDC‟s international presence: 
We need EDC to ensure we keep a level playing field with our 
competitors. In the last three years, the [Automotive Parts 
Manufacturers‟ Association] has led trade missions to Russia, 
India, China, Hungary, Slovakia, the Czech Republic and Japan 
and, over the last ten years, we have led trade missions to almost 
every country in the world that is a significant producer of vehicles 
and parts for them. EDC has generally participated in those trade 
missions and we need them to continue to participate. ... They 
publish [country analysis] information, and it is available to other 
Canadian companies, especially to the small and medium 
enterprises ... that do not have the ability to gather this information 
on their own.
15
B. What the Committee Recommends 
The committee believes that the changing global business environment, in the context of both the 
current economic crisis and ongoing transformations, underline the need for continued flexibility 
in EDC‟s services in order to enhance the competitiveness and global presence of Canadian 
companies, particularly exporters. We were encouraged to hear that EDC recognises the changes 
in the global environment and is responsive to the evolving needs of Canadian businesses.   
Recommendation 1 
The committee recommends that the Government of Canada 
continue the mandate of Export Development Canada (EDC), 
which includes the promotion of Canadian businesses abroad by 
providing services at all stages of the business cycle, and make 
adjustments as appropriate.  
13
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 4, p. 45. 
14
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 4, p. 17. 
15
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 4, p. 30. 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. C#.NET WPF PDF Viewer Tool: Convert and Export PDF.
convert multiple pdf to jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List foreach (string file in imagePaths) { Bitmap tmpBmp = new Bitmap
pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
Page 14 
The committee recalls the comments made by the Minister of International Trade about the 
advantages of the co-location of EDC offices with Canada‟s diplomatic missions and the 
establishment of separate offices if deemed appropriate. We are also cognizant of the IFC report‟s 
comment about EDC‟s lack of authorization to establish overseas offices independent of the 
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, unlike other federal Crown corporations 
such as the Canadian Commercial Corporation.
16
While the committee appreciates that co-
location of EDC and diplomatic offices may be advantageous in some cases, we believe that this 
situation should be examined on a case-by-case basis. 
Recommendation 2 
The committee recommends that international offices of EDC be 
located where they would be the most effective for Canadian 
companies, including separately from Canadian diplomatic 
missions
At the same time, the committee believes that EDC can do more to maximize the potential found 
in Canada‟s diaspora communities in order to facilitate and achieve successful international 
business relationships. We appreciate that EDC‟s first priority when staffing an office abroad 
should be the objective business skills and knowledge of an individual. However, we note that 
many of EDC‟s international offices are located in the home countries of Canada‟s diaspora 
communities. Individuals from these communities have vital business contacts and cultural 
insights and could add significant value to EDC‟s operations. Such individuals offer their human 
and social capital in addition to their knowledge of the local business culture, which can benefit 
Canadian businesses.
17
Recommendation 3 
The committee recommends that EDC maximize the cultural, 
human and social abilities of Canada’s diaspora communities 
including when staffing its offices, particularly those outside of 
Canada, in order to exploit opportunities for Canadian business.   
16
Specifically, section 17 of the Export Development Act restricts EDC‟s independent authority to establish offices to 
anywhere in Canada. International Financial Consulting Ltd., The Legislative Review of Export Development 
Canada, December 2008, pp. 77-78. 
17
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 3, pp. 42-44. 
Page 15 
EDC AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR: 
COMPETING TO MEET THE NEEDS OF 
CANADIAN EXPORTERS? 
A. What the Witnesses Said 
During the course of the study, the committee was told that EDC has an unfair competitive 
advantage over the private sector in a number of areas. For example, EDC‟s presence in the short-
term (ST) export credit insurance market exceeds simply filling gaps in the market; EDC‟s 
backing by the Crown gives it an unfair advantage in raising capital; and EDC is not subject to 
the same financial reporting requirements as its competitors. 
1. The Short-Term Credit Insurance Market and Other Services 
Among EDC‟s many services, short-term export credit insurance covers political and commercial 
risks for non-payment of exports, and applies to goods and services sold up to two years‟ credit. 
In its report, the IFC estimated that more than 90 per cent of world exports are sold for cash or on 
credit of up to 180 days.
18
According to witnesses, short-term export credit insurance is one service area where EDC is in 
direct competition with the private sector, particularly in the very short-term period of up to 180 
days. Euler Hermes, Atradius and Coface are the three largest private-sector providers of short-
term export credit insurance, with an estimated combined share of 85 per cent of the global 
market.
19
However, these three private-sector insurers make up less than 25 per cent of the 
Canadian market. Although the market share of these companies is increasing in Canada, while 
that of EDC is falling, EDC continues to dominate the Canadian market for short-term export 
credit insurance. 
Both Euler Hermes and Atradius argued that EDC should withdraw from the short-term export 
credit insurance market. As indicated by Euler Hermes: 
I reiterate our concern and opposition to IFC‟s main 
recommendation that EDC‟s mandate remain unchanged. The facts 
presented to IFC by Euler Hermes Canada and other competitors 
reflect the reality of fundamental changes in the global economic 
environment over the last decade and call out for EDC to withdraw 
from the short-term credit insurance market.
20
18
International Financial Consulting Ltd., (December 2008), p. 23. 
19
These companies have such advantages as credit information on buyers worldwide as well as significant income 
from premiums paid worldwide. This income in 2007 is reported as follows: Euler Hermes US$2.7 billion, Atradius 
US$2.6 billion and Coface US$1.6 billion. Comparatively, EDC‟s income from premiums paid was C$0.98 billion in 
that year.  
20
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 3, p. 53. 
Page 16 
A similar point was made by Atradius:  
We strongly recommend to you that EDC withdraw from the role 
of primary insurer and shift to a role of re-insurer in the short-term 
export credit insurance.
21
EDC provided the committee with a different perspective, and argued that, in its provision of 
short-term insurance and other financing services, it takes on a higher level of risk compared to 
its private-sector competitors and, therefore, provides more needed services to Canadian 
businesses wishing to expand. It is able to do so by setting aside capital with a specific allocation 
towards relatively higher-risk, lower-grade investments. Furthermore, EDC is able to remain in 
the market longer than a private-sector insurer, thereby holding a credit limit open for an 
extended period of time. According to IFC, “EDC, apart from being owned by government, is 
Canada first; it makes a decision to support a buyer perhaps longer than the private sector.”
22
Moreover, the presence of EDC in the market is particularly important during economic 
downturns. Several of the witnesses said that, as the financial crisis worsened, both credit and 
insurance became relatively more expensive and private-sector insurers largely vacated the 
market. Thus, as market gaps become apparent and grow larger, Canadian exporters rely on the 
services provided by EDC.  
According to the Forest Products Association of Canada: 
Our companies are reporting to us that in the area of receivables 
and insurance the private insurers have completely vacated the 
market for those markets to which we export, which would be, for 
example, U.S. newspapers and U.S. housing. […] EDC has stepped 
in behind the private insurers in a major and significant way, which 
has allowed our companies to keep receiving that sort of insurance. 
That is one example.
23
The Automotive Parts Manufacturers‟ Association agreed: 
The regular financial institutions have almost abandoned the 
automotive industry as a place to do business. Certainly, these 
institutions are not doing any new business. They may have 
retained existing business, but there is no new business to be had. 
EDC was the only significant institution with the appetite for a little 
more risk, and it was able to step in and give financing where other 
financial institutions did not.
24
21
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 2, p. 47. 
22
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 2, p. 21. 
23
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 3, p. 65. 
24
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 4, p. 31. 
Page 17 
The private-sector insurers confirmed these concerns in explaining that they are 
relatively more risk averse. Specifically, Atradius testified: 
Like all industries, adjustment will occur in our sector as well, but, 
as much as possible, we must adhere to the principle that markets 
should decide on acceptable risks, not government. Does this mean 
somewhat more difficult credit? You bet. We will not be driven to 
taking unsound risks.
25
Competition in short-term export credit insurance markets, as well as in markets for other 
services provided by EDC, is not explicitly regulated. Rather, EDC operates in a free market. At 
the same time, OECD member countries have agreed to a „gentleman‟s arrangement‟ for 
Officially Supported Export Credits, which aims to ensure that export credits are not being used 
as subsidies. Furthermore, Canada can be challenged under the World Trade Organization (WTO) 
agreements if seen to be providing a subsidy through export credits. While the IFC report found 
that EDC‟s services are generally more costly than private-sector competitors, it also noted that 
EDC is competitive because it is generally able to provide more coverage to its clients, and 
because of its ability to tolerate more risk.  
2. The Ability to Raise Capital 
EDC is able to raise capital with more ease than its private-sector competitors in part due to its 
higher credit rating. Standard & Poor‟s AAA rating of EDC reflects the fact that EDC is 100 per 
cent government-owned; the provision of debt constitutes a direct obligation of the federal 
government and is a charge on, and payable out of, the federal government‟s Consolidated 
Revenue Fund. However, debt is generally financed by EDC‟s own resources, and EDC has been 
“financially profitable for every year except one.”
26
Moreover, in its testimony, the Department 
of Finance stated, “although EDC had advantages in terms of its cost of funds, there was no 
evidence that EDC was passing along lower pricing on its loans or anything that would be seen as 
unfair competition.” Although EDC‟s relatively higher credit rating makes it easier to raise 
capital, the cost savings are not passed on to the client. As a result, EDC‟s rating does not put it at 
an unfair advantage over its private-sector competitors.  
As discussed above, EDC is financially self-sustaining and operates in accordance with corporate 
principles. Therefore, it is important to consider the financial implications of EDC withdrawing 
from the short-term export credit insurance market completely, or becoming simply the lender of 
last resort and a re-insurer. Without EDC in this market, fewer high-risk clients would likely be 
served by private insurers, which have less risk tolerance. Moreover, if EDC ended its 
participation in the short-term export credit insurance market, the relatively lower revenues that 
would result might limit the services it provides. Ultimately, the Canadian export community 
would be underserved. 
25
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 2, p. 46. 
26
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 3, p. 18. 
Page 18 
3. Reporting, Accountability and Administrative Costs 
The lack of transparency in respect of EDC‟s operations is also considered to provide a 
competitive advantage. The IFC report concluded that EDC should be required to be more 
transparent and accountable in the areas of short-term export credit insurance, and should provide 
public information consistent with what its private-sector counterparts are required to publish.  
Part of these concerns relate to EDC not being subject to the financial reporting requirements of 
the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI). OSFI regulates and supervises 
federal financial institutions and federally regulated private pension plans, creating a framework 
that manages risk, contributes to public confidence and helps to ensure that these institutions and 
plans remain in sound financial condition. Accordingly, private-sector insurers provide detailed 
financial information to the OSFI, some of which is available publicly while other remains 
confidential. However, as confirmed by the Department of Finance, a federal Crown corporation 
cannot be regulated by the OSFI. Rather, operating at arms-length from the federal government, 
EDC is governed by the Financial Administration Act (FAA) and is audited by the Auditor 
General of Canada. 
Currently, EDC does not publish comparable financial details regarding short-term export credit 
insurance; similar data are grouped together in the annual reports. Concerns in this regard were 
raised by both IFC
27
and EDC‟s private-sector competitors. For example, Atradius stated: 
EDC does not provide adequate financial information to its 
shareholders, nor does it need to comply with OSFI regulations. 
This is wrong. For example, up until the release of the report, it was 
impossible to get information on the short-term credit insurance 
business line, despite the fact that it is used by over 80 per cent of 
their customers and represents over 65 per cent of its business 
volume. I do not know whether EDC‟s accounts substantiate the 
consultant‟s conclusions, but neither do you.
28
In its testimony, the IFC stated that a change to these reporting requirements was the primary 
recommendation resulting from the legislative review of EDC.
29
It informed the committee, 
“There is no reason to believe that EDC is doing anything wrong, but transparency goes a long 
way to build confidence in the market.”
30
However, these concerns must be balanced with the demands created by additional reporting and 
EDC‟s ability to remain competitive internationally. Some witnesses were concerned that if EDC 
publicly provides information at the transaction level, it may inadvertently assist the domestic 
private-sector competition, as well as export credit agencies (ECA) of other countries, thereby 
27
International Financial Consulting Ltd., (December 2008), p. 33. 
28
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 2, p. 46. 
29
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 2, p. 22. 
30
Evidence, 40
th
Parliament, 2
nd
Session, Issue no. 2, p. 22. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested