mvc export to excel and pdf : Convert pdf pictures to jpg SDK software API wpf winforms azure sharepoint form10kunofficial_pdf7-part1473

71 
The gross liability for unrecognized tax benefits at November 27, 2009 was $218.0 million, exclusive of interest and 
penalties. The timing of the resolution of income tax examinations is highly uncertain as are the amounts and timing of tax 
payments that are part of any audit settlement process. These events could cause large fluctuations in the balance sheet 
classification of current and non-current assets and liabilities. We believe that before the end of fiscal 2010, it is reasonably 
possible that either certain audits will conclude or statutes of limitations on certain income tax examination periods will 
expire, or both. Given the uncertainties described above, we can only determine a range of estimated potential decreases in 
underlying unrecognized tax benefits equal to $0 to approximately $10.0 million.  These amounts would decrease income tax 
expense under accounting for income taxes and as a result of the revised accounting guidance for business combinations in 
fiscal 2010. See Note 1 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. Under the revised accounting guidance for 
business combinations, adjustments to acquired income tax liabilities (including adjustments for acquisitions completed prior 
to the effective date) that are recorded subsequent to the acquisition date will be recognized in income from continuing 
operations, with certain exceptions, if such changes occur after the measurement period. 
Royalties 
We have certain royalty commitments associated with the shipment and licensing of certain products. Royalty expense 
is generally based on a dollar amount per unit shipped or a percentage of the underlying revenue. 
Guarantees 
The lease agreements for our corporate headquarters provide for residual value guarantees. The fair value of a residual 
value guarantee in lease agreements entered into after December 31, 2002, must be recognized as a liability on our 
Consolidated Balance Sheets. As such, we recognized $5.2 million and $3.0 million in liabilities, related to the extended East 
and West Towers and Almaden Tower leases, respectively. These liabilities are recorded in other long-term liabilities with 
the offsetting entry recorded as prepaid rent in other assets. The balance will be amortized to our Consolidated Statements of 
Income over the life of the leases. As of November 27, 2009, the unamortized portion of the fair value of the residual value 
guarantees remaining in other long-term liabilities and prepaid rent was $1.3 million. 
Indemnifications 
In the normal course of business, we provide indemnifications of varying scope to customers against claims of 
intellectual property infringement made by third-parties arising from the use of our products. Historically, costs related to 
these indemnification provisions have not been significant and we are unable to estimate the maximum potential impact of 
these indemnification provisions on our future results of operations. 
To the extent permitted under Delaware law, we have agreements whereby we indemnify our directors and officers for 
certain events or occurrences while the director or officer is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity. The 
indemnification period covers all pertinent events and occurrences during the director’s or officer’s lifetime. The maximum 
potential amount of future payments we could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited; 
however, we have director and officer insurance coverage that limits our exposure and enables us to recover a portion of any 
future amounts paid. We believe the estimated fair value of these indemnification agreements in excess of applicable 
insurance coverage is minimal. 
As part of our limited partnership interests in Adobe Ventures, we have provided a general indemnification to Granite 
Ventures, an independent venture capital firm and sole general partner of Adobe Ventures, for certain events or occurrences 
while Granite Ventures is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity provided that Granite Ventures acts in good faith on 
behalf of the partnership. We are unable to develop an estimate of the maximum potential amount of future payments that 
could potentially result from any hypothetical future claim, but believe the risk of having to make any payments under this 
general indemnification to be remote. 
Recent Accounting Pronouncements 
See Note 1 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for information regarding the effect of new accounting 
pronouncements on our financial statements. 
Convert pdf pictures to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter
Convert pdf pictures to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
conversion pdf to jpg; change file from pdf to jpg
72 
ITEM 7A.  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK 
All market risk sensitive instruments were entered into for non-trading purposes. 
Foreign Currency Risk 
Foreign Currency Hedging Instruments 
In countries outside the U.S., we transact business, in U.S. dollars and in various other currencies. In Europe and Japan, 
transactions that are denominated in Euro and Yen, respectively, are subject to exposure from movements in exchange rates. 
We hedge our net recognized foreign currency assets and liabilities with foreign exchange forward contracts to reduce the 
risk that our earnings and cash flows will be adversely affected by changes in exchange rates. We may use foreign exchange 
option or forward contracts for Euro- or Yen-denominated revenue. 
In fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007, our revenue exposures were 504.3 million Euros, 628.2 million Euros and 595.5 million 
Euros, respectively. In fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007, our revenue exposures were 30.3 billion Yen, 36.8 billion Yen and 35.5 
billion Yen, respectively.  
Our European operating expenses are primarily in Euro and our Japanese operating expenses are in Yen, which 
mitigates a portion of the exposure related to Euro and Yen denominated product revenue. In addition, we hedge firmly 
committed transactions using forward contracts. These contracts do subject us to risk of accounting gains and losses; 
however, the gains and losses on these contracts largely offset gains and losses on the assets, liabilities and transactions being 
hedged. We also hedge a percentage of forecasted international revenue with purchased option contracts and forward 
contracts. Our revenue hedging policy is intended to help mitigate the impact on our forecasted revenue due to foreign 
currency exchange rate movements. As of November 27, 2009, total outstanding contracts were $510.4 million which 
included the notional equivalent of $283.9 million in Euro, 182.1 million in Yen and $44.4 million in other foreign 
currencies. These hedges are foreign currency forward exchange contracts which hedged our balance sheet exposures and 
purchased put option contracts which hedged our forecasted revenue. As of November 27, 2009, all contracts were set to 
expire at various times through July 2010. The bank counterparties in these contracts expose us to credit-related losses in the 
event of their nonperformance. However, to mitigate that risk, we only contract with counterparties who meet our minimum 
requirements under our counterparty risk assessment process. In addition, our hedging policy establishes maximum limits for 
each counterparty. 
In addition, we also have long-term investment exposures consisting of the capitalization and retained earnings in our 
non-USD functional currency foreign subsidiaries. As of November 27, 2009 and November 28, 2008, this long-term 
investment exposure totaled a notional equivalent of $228.8 million and $149.1 million, respectively. At this time, we do not 
hedge these long-term investment exposures. 
Economic Hedging—Hedges of Forecasted Transactions 
We may use foreign exchange option contracts or forward contracts to hedge certain operational (“cash flow”) 
exposures resulting from changes in foreign currency exchange rates. These foreign exchange contracts, carried at fair value, 
may have maturities between one and twelve months. Such cash flow exposures result from portions of our forecasted 
revenue denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, primarily the Euro and the Japanese Yen. We enter into these 
foreign exchange contracts to hedge forecasted product licensing revenue in the normal course of business and accordingly, 
they are not speculative in nature. 
We record changes in the intrinsic value of these cash flow hedges in accumulated other comprehensive income, until 
the forecasted transaction occurs. When the forecasted transaction occurs, we reclassify the related gain or loss on the cash 
flow hedge to revenue. In the event the underlying forecasted transaction does not occur, or it becomes probable that it will 
not occur, we reclassify the gain or loss on the related cash flow hedge from accumulated other comprehensive income to 
interest and other income, net on our Consolidated Statements of Income at that time. For the fiscal year ended November 27, 
2009, there were no such net gains or losses recognized in other income relating to hedges of forecasted transactions that did 
not occur. 
See Note 5 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for information regarding our hedging activities. 
Balance Sheet Hedging—Hedging of Foreign Currency Assets and Liabilities 
We hedge our net recognized foreign currency assets and liabilities with foreign exchange forward contracts to reduce 
the risk that our earnings and cash flows will be adversely affected by changes in foreign currency exchange rates. These 
derivative instruments hedge assets and liabilities that are denominated in foreign currencies and are carried at fair value with  
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you. Afterwards you can pick the pictures you want and save
batch pdf to jpg online; bulk pdf to jpg
TIFF to JPEG Converter | Convert TIFF to JPEG, Convert JPEG to
is batch-convert, TIFF to JPEG Converter supports conversions for single JPG file. Easy to crop and mirror your pictures; Simple to convert certain range
convert pdf file to jpg format; change pdf to jpg image
73 
changes in the fair value recorded as interest and other income, net. These derivative instruments do not subject us to material 
balance sheet risk due to exchange rate movements because gains and losses on these derivatives are intended to offset gains 
and losses on the assets and liabilities being hedged. At November 27, 2009, the outstanding balance sheet hedging 
derivatives had maturities of 90 days or less. 
A sensitivity analysis was performed on all of our foreign exchange derivatives as of November 27, 2009. This 
sensitivity analysis was based on a modeling technique that measures the hypothetical market value resulting from a 10% 
shift in the value of exchange rates relative to the U.S. dollar. For option contracts, the Black-Scholes equation model was 
used. For forward contracts, duration modeling was used where hypothetical changes are made to the spot rates of the 
currency. A 10% increase in the value of the U.S. dollar (and a corresponding decrease in the value of the hedged foreign 
currency asset) would lead to an increase in the fair value of our financial hedging instruments by $22.2 million. Conversely, 
a 10% decrease in the value of the U.S. dollar would result in a decrease in the fair value of these financial instruments by 
$12.9 million. 
We do not use derivative financial instruments for speculative trading purposes, nor do we hedge our foreign currency 
exposure in a manner that entirely offsets the effects of changes in foreign exchange rates. 
As a general rule, we do not use financial instruments to hedge local currency denominated operating expenses in 
countries where a natural hedge exists. For example, in many countries, revenue from the local currency product licenses 
substantially offsets the local currency denominated operating expenses. We assess the need to utilize financial instruments to 
hedge currency exposures, primarily related to operating expenses, on an ongoing basis. 
We regularly review our hedging program and may as part of this review determine to change our hedging program. 
See Note 5 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for information regarding our hedging activities. 
Interest Rate Risk 
Short-Term Investments and Fixed Income Securities 
At November 27, 2009, we had debt securities classified as short-term investments of $900.0 million. Changes in 
interest rates could adversely affect the market value of these investments. The following table separates these investments, 
based on stated maturities, to show the approximate exposure to interest rates (in millions):  
Due within one year .....................................................................  $ 
387.6 
Due within two years ....................................................................   
249.9 
Due within three years ...................................................................   
218.6 
Due after three years .....................................................................   
43.9 
Total ................................................................................  $ 
900.0 
A sensitivity analysis was performed on our investment portfolio as of November 27, 2009. The analysis is based on an 
estimate of the hypothetical changes in market value of the portfolio that would result from an immediate parallel shift in the 
yield curve of various magnitudes.  
The following tables present the hypothetical fair values of our debt securities classified as short-term investments 
assuming immediate parallel shifts in the yield curve of 50 basis points (“BPS”), 100 BPS and 150 BPS.  The analysis is 
shown as of November 27, 2009 and November 28, 2008 (dollars in millions): 
-150 BPS 
-100 BPS  
-50 BPS  
Fair Value 
11/27/2009 
+50 BPS  
+100 BPS  
+150 BPS  
910.8 
909.2 
905.4 
900.0 
893.9 
888.0 
882.2 
-150 BPS 
-100 BPS  
-50 BPS  
Fair Value 
11/28/2008 
+50 BPS  
+100 BPS  
+150 BPS  
1,145.8 
1,142.3 
1,136.4 
1,129.7 
1,123.0 
1,116.4 
1,109.9 
74 
Other Market Risk 
Privately Held Long-Term Investments 
The privately held companies in which we invest, can still be considered in the start-up or development stages which 
are inherently risky. The technologies or products these companies have under development are typically in the early stages 
and may never materialize, which could result in a loss of a substantial part of our initial investment in these companies. The 
evaluation of privately held companies is based on information that we request from these companies which is not subject to 
the same disclosure regulations as U.S. publicly traded companies and as such, the basis for these evaluations is subject to the 
timing and accuracy of the data received from these companies.  
See Note 4 and Note 8 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for information regarding our limited 
partnership interest in Adobe Ventures. 
Short-Term Investments and Marketable Equity Securities 
We are exposed to equity price risk on our portfolio of marketable equity securities. As of November 27, 2009, our total 
equity holdings in publicly traded companies were valued at $5.0 million compared to $3.0 million at November 28, 2008. 
The increase was primarily due to the change in the fair value of our equity holdings during fiscal 2009.  
The following table represents the potential decrease in fair values of our marketable equity securities as of November 
27, 2009, that are sensitive to changes in the stock market. Fair value deteriorations of 50%, 35% and 15% were selected for 
illustrative purposes because none is more likely to occur than another. 
(in millions) 
50% 
35% 
15% 
Marketable equity securities ..............................  $ 
(2.5 ) 
(1.7 ) 
(0.8 ) 
75 
ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA 
INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
Page 
Consolidated Balance Sheets ........................................................................   
76 
Consolidated Statements of Income ...................................................................   
77 
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity and Comprehensive Income ...............................   
78 
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows ...............................................................   
79 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements ............................................................   
80 
Report of KPMG LLP, Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm ....................................   
122 
All financial statement schedules have been omitted, since the required information is not applicable or is not present in 
amounts sufficient to require submission of the schedule, or because the information required is included in the Consolidated 
Financial Statements and Notes thereto. 
76 
ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED 
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS 
(In thousands, except par value) 
November 27, 
November 28, 
2009 
2008 
ASSETS 
Current assets: 
Cash and cash equivalents ..................................................  $ 
999,487  $ 
886,450  
Short-term investments .....................................................   
904,986   
1,132,752  
Trade receivables, net of allowances for doubtful accounts of $15,225 and $4,128, 
respectively ............................................................   
410,879 
467,234  
Deferred income taxes .....................................................   
77,417   
110,713  
Prepaid expenses and other current assets ......................................   
80,855   
137,954  
Total current assets ......................................................   
2,473,624   
2,735,103  
Property and equipment, net ...................................................   
388,132   
313,037  
Goodwill ..................................................................   
3,494,589   
2,134,730  
Purchased and other intangibles, net ............................................   
527,388   
214,960  
Investment in lease receivable .................................................   
207,239   
207,239  
Other assets ................................................................   
191,265   
216,529  
Total assets ............................................................  $ 7,282,237  $ 5,821,598  
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY 
Current liabilities: 
Trade payables............................................................  $ 
58,904  $ 
55,840  
Accrued expenses .........................................................   
419,646   
399,969  
Accrued restructuring ......................................................   
37,793   
35,690  
Income taxes payable ......................................................   
46,634   
27,136  
Deferred revenue ..........................................................   
281,576   
243,964  
Total current liabilities ...................................................   
844,553   
762,599  
Long-term liabilities: 
Debt ....................................................................   
1,000,000   
350,000  
Deferred revenue ..........................................................   
36,717   
31,356  
Accrued restructuring ......................................................   
6,921   
6,214  
Income taxes payable ......................................................   
223,528   
123,182  
Deferred income taxes .....................................................   
252,486   
117,328  
Other liabilities ...........................................................   
27,464   
20,565  
Total liabilities .........................................................   
2,391,669   
1,411,244  
Commitments and contingencies 
Stockholders’ equity: 
Preferred stock, $0.0001 par value; 2,000 shares authorized; none issued ............   
—   
—  
Common stock, $0.0001 par value; 900,000 shares authorized; 600,834 shares issued; 
522,657 and 526,111shares outstanding, respectively ..........................   
61 
61  
Additional paid-in-capital ...................................................   
2,390,061   
2,396,819  
Retained earnings .........................................................   
5,299,914   
4,913,406  
Accumulated other comprehensive income ....................................   
24,446   
57,222  
Treasury stock, at cost (78,177 and 74,723 shares, respectively), net of re-issuances ...   
(2,823,914 )  
(2,957,154 ) 
Total stockholders’ equity ................................................   
4,890,568   
4,410,354  
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity ....................................  $ 7,282,237  $ 5,821,598  
See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. 
77 
ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED 
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME  
(In thousands, except per share data) 
Years Ended 
November 27, 
2009 
November 28, 
2008 
November 30, 
2007 
Revenue: 
Products ....................................................  $ 
2,759,391  $ 3,396,542  $ 3,019,524  
Services and support ..........................................   
186,462   
183,347   138,357  
Total revenue ..............................................   
2,945,853   3,579,889   3,157,881  
Cost of revenue: 
Products ....................................................   
228,897   
266,389   270,818  
Services and support ..........................................   
67,835   
96,241   
83,876  
Total cost of revenue .......................................   
296,732   
362,630   354,694  
Gross profit ...................................................   
2,649,121   3,217,259   2,803,187  
Operating expenses: 
Research and development .....................................   
565,141   
662,057   613,242  
Sales and marketing ..........................................   
981,903   1,089,341   984,388  
General and administrative .....................................   
298,749   
337,291   274,982  
Restructuring charges .........................................   
41,260   
32,053   
555  
Amortization of purchased intangibles and incomplete technology   
71,555   
68,246   
72,435  
Total operating expenses ....................................   
1,958,608   2,188,988   1,945,602  
Operating income ..............................................   
690,513   1,028,271   857,585  
Non-operating income (expense): 
Interest and other income, net ..................................   
31,380   
43,847   
82,724  
Interest expense ..............................................   
(3,407 )  
(10,019 )  
(253 ) 
Investment gains (losses), net ...................................   
(16,966 )  
16,409   
7,134  
Total non-operating income (expense), net ......................   
11,007   
50,237   
89,605  
Income before income taxes ......................................   
701,520   1,078,508   947,190  
Provision for income taxes .......................................   
315,012   
206,694   223,383  
Net income ....................................................  $ 
386,508  $ 
871,814  $ 723,807  
Basic net income per share .......................................  $ 
0.74  $ 
1.62  $ 
1.24  
Shares used in computing basic income per share ....................   
524,470   
539,373   584,203  
Diluted net income per share .....................................  $ 
0.73  $ 
1.59  $ 
1.21  
Shares used in computing diluted income per share ...................   
530,610   
548,553   
598,775  
See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. 
78 
ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED 
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME 
(In thousands)  
Common Stock 
Additional 
Paid-In 
Retained  
Accumulated 
Other 
Comprehensive  
Treasury Stock 
Shares  Amount  
Capital 
Earnings  
Income 
Shares   Amount   
Total 
Balances at December 1, 2006 ......  
600,834  $ 
61  
$ 2,451,610  $ 
3,317,785  
6,344  
(13,608 ) $ (623,924 ) $ 5,151,876 
Comprehensive income: 
Net income ....................  
—   
—   
—   
723,807  
—  
—   
—   
723,807 
Other comprehensive income, 
net of taxes ..................  
—   
—  
—   
—  
21,604  
—   
—   
21,604 
Total comprehensive income, 
net of taxes ..................  
—   
—  
—   
—  
—  
—   
—   
745,411 
Re-issuance of treasury stock under 
stock compensation plans ........  
—   
—  
(298,776 )  
—  
—  
23,918   
814,863   
516,087 
Tax benefit from employee stock 
option plans ..................  
—   
—   
66,966   
—  
—  
—   
—   
66,966 
Purchase of treasury stock...........  
—   
—   
—   
—  
—  
(39,735 )  (1,951,527 )  (1,951,527 
Stock-based compensation .........  
—   
—   149,987   
—  
—  
— 
— 
149,987 
Adjustment to the valuation of 
Macromedia assumed options ......  
—   
—  
(28,818 )  
—  
—  
—   
—   
(28,818 
Balances at November 30, 2007 ......  
600,834  $ 
61  
$ 2,340,969  $ 
4,041,592  
27,948  
(29,425 ) $ (1,760,588 ) $ 4,649,982 
Comprehensive income: 
Net income .....................  
—   
—   
—   
871,814  
—  
—   
—   
871,814 
Other comprehensive income,  
net of taxes ...................  
—   
—   
—   
—  
29,274  
—   
—   
29,274 
Total comprehensive income,  
net of taxes ...................  
—   
—   
—   
—  
—  
—   
—   
901,088 
Re-issuance of treasury stock under 
stock compensation plans ........  
—   
—   (206,984 )  
—  
—  
12,994   
526,149   
319,165 
Tax benefit from employee stock 
option plans ...................  
—   
—  
90,360   
—  
—  
—   
—   
90,360 
Purchase of treasury stock..........  
—   
—  
—   
—  
—  
(58,292 )  (1,722,715 )  (1,722,715 
Stock-based compensation ..........  
—   
—   172,474   
—  
—  
—   
—   
172,474 
Balances at November 28, 2008 .....  
600,834  $ 
61  $ 2,396,819  $ 4,913,406  $ 
57,222  
(74,723 ) $ (2,957,154 ) $ 4,410,354 
Comprehensive income: 
Net income ....................  
—   
—  
—   
386,508  
—  
—   
—   
386,508 
Other comprehensive income,  
net of taxes ..................  
—   
—  
—   
—  
(32,776)  
—   
—   
(32,776) 
Total comprehensive income, net of 
taxes .......................  
—   
—  
—   
—  
—  
—   
—   
353,732 
Re-issuance of treasury stock under 
stock compensation plans ........  
—   
—  
(303,688 )  
—  
—  
11,777   
483,254   
179,566 
Tax benefit from employee stock 
option plans ..................  
—   
—   
44,381   
—  
—  
—   
—   
44,381 
Purchase of treasury stock...........  
—   
—   
—   
—  
—  
(15,231 )  
(350,014 )  
(350,014 
Equity awards assumed for acquisition .  
—   
—   
84,968   
—  
—  
— 
— 
84,968 
Stock-based compensation ..........  
—   
—  
167,581   
—  
—  
—   
—   
167,581 
Balances at November 27, 2009 .....  
600,834  $ 
61  
$ 2,390,061  $ 
5,299,914  
24,446  
(78,177 ) $ (2,823,914 ) $ 4,890,568 
See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. 
79 
ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED 
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS 
(In thousands) 
Years Ended 
November 27, 
2009 
November 28, 
2008 
November 30, 
2007 
Cash flows from operating activities: 
Net income .................................................... 
386,508 
871,814 
723,807 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by 
operating activities: 
Depreciation, amortization and accretion ........................... 
282,423 
270,269 
315,464 
Stock-based compensation ...................................... 
167,581 
172,474 
149,987 
Deferred income taxes .......................................... 
49,590 
46,584 
58,385 
Unrealized losses (gains) on investments ........................... 
11,623 
(17,377 
(6,776 
Tax benefit from employee stock option plans .......................  
44,381 
90,360 
55,074 
Other non-cash items ........................................... 
4,434 
4,784 
(176 
Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation ................... 
(11,980 
(31,983 
(85,050 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of acquired assets 
and assumed liabilities: 
Trade receivables, net ........................................ 
172,287 
(153,386 
46,332 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets .........................  
21,814 
(5,584 
6,418 
Trade payables ............................................. 
(13,601 
14,078 
3,518 
Accrued expenses ........................................... 
(53,320 
(13,904 
83,281 
Accrued restructuring ........................................  
(8,446 
24,330 
(13,796 
Income taxes payable ........................................ 
109,620 
(57,656 
61,448 
Deferred revenue ............................................ 
(45,142 
65,879 
43,137 
Net cash provided by operating activities ....................... 
1,117,772 
1,280,682 
1,441,053 
Cash flows from investing activities: 
Purchases of short-term investments ................................. 
(1,307,366 
(2,381,533 
(2,503,147 
Maturities of short-term investments ................................. 
464,031 
1,568,874 
516,839 
Proceeds from sales of short-term investments ......................... 
1,057,176 
717,076 
2,457,347 
Purchases of property and equipment ................................ 
(119,592 
(111,792 
(132,075 
Acquisitions, net of cash acquired ................................... 
(1,582,669 
(3,584 
(75,528 
Purchases of long-term investments and other assets .................... 
(29,143 
(124,469 
(111,939 
Investment in lease receivable ...................................... 
— 
— 
(80,439 
Issuance costs for credit facility .................................... 
— 
— 
(856 
Proceeds from sale of long-term investments .......................... 
17,696 
30,747 
11,342 
Other .........................................................  
2,771 
— 
— 
Net cash (used for) provided by investing activities ............... 
(1,497,096 
(304,681 
81,544 
Cash flows from financing activities: 
Purchases of treasury stock ........................................ 
(350,013 
(1,722,715 
(1,951,527 
Proceeds from issuance of treasury stock ............................. 
179,566 
319,165 
516,087 
Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation ..................... 
11,980 
31,983 
85,050 
Proceeds from borrowings on credit facility ........................... 
650,000 
800,000 
— 
Repayments of borrowings on credit facility ........................... 
— 
(450,000 
— 
Repayments of acquired debt ....................................... 
(13,875 
— 
— 
Net cash provided by (used for) financing activities ............... 
477,658 
(1,021,567 
(1,350,390 
Effect of foreign currency exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents ........ 
14,703 
(14,406 
1,715 
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents ......................  
113,037 
(59,972 
173,922 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year ........................... 
886,450 
946,422 
772,500 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of year ................................ 
999,487 
886,450 
946,422 
Supplemental disclosures: 
Cash paid for income taxes, net of refunds ............................  
105,158 
126,299 
55,236 
Cash paid for interest ............................................. 
2,088 
9,604 
— 
Non-cash investing activities: 
Issuance of common stock and stock awards assumed in business acquisitions  
84,968 
$
— 
$
— 
See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. 
ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED 
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
80 
NOTE 1.  SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES 
Operations 
Founded in 1982, Adobe Systems Incorporated is one of the largest and most diversified software companies in the 
world. We offer a line of creative, business, Web and mobile software and services used by creative professionals, knowledge 
workers, consumers, original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”), developers and enterprises for creating, managing, 
delivering, optimizing and engaging with compelling content and experiences across multiple operating systems, devices and 
media. We distribute our products through a network of distributors, value-added resellers (“VARs”), systems integrators, 
independent software vendors (“ISVs”) and OEMs, direct to end users and through our own Website at www.adobe.com. We 
also license our technology to hardware manufacturers, software developers and service providers, and we offer integrated 
software solutions to businesses of all sizes. We have operations in the Americas, Europe, Middle East and Africa (“EMEA”) 
and Asia. Our software runs on personal computers with Microsoft Windows, Apple Mac OS, Linux, UNIX and various non-
PC platforms, depending on the product. 
Basis of Presentation 
The accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements include those of Adobe and its subsidiaries, after elimination of 
all intercompany accounts and transactions. We have prepared the accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements in 
accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and pursuant to the 
rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). 
Use of Estimates 
In preparation of consolidated financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with GAAP and pursuant to the 
rules and regulations of the SEC, we must  make estimates and judgments that affect the amounts reported in the 
Consolidated Financial Statements and accompanying notes. Estimates are used for, but not limited to sales allowances and 
programs, bad debts, stock-based compensation, allocation of purchase price allocations, excess inventory and purchase 
commitments, restructuring costs, facilities lease losses, impairment of goodwill and intangible assets, litigation, income 
taxes and investments. Actual results may differ materially from these estimates. 
Fiscal Year 
Our fiscal year is a 52- or 53-week year that ends on the Friday closest to November 30. Fiscal years 2009, 2008 and 
2007 were all 52 weeks. 
Reclassification 
Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to current year presentation in the Consolidated Statements 
of Cash Flows. The previously reported classifications of net cash provided by (used for) operating activities, investing 
activities and financing activities for any period presented were not affected by these reclassifications.  
Allowance for Doubtful Accounts 
We maintain an allowance for doubtful accounts which reflects our best estimate of potentially uncollectible trade 
receivables. We regularly review our trade receivables allowances by considering such factors as historical experience, 
credit-worthiness, the age of the trade receivable balances and current economic conditions that may affect a customer’s 
ability to pay and we specifically reserve for those deemed uncollectible.  
(in thousands) 
2009 
2008 
2007 
Beginning balance ...................................  
4,128 
4,398 
6,798 
Increase due to acquisition ............................  
9,421 
— 
— 
Charged (credited) to operating expenses ................  
2,841 
4,414 
(1,367 
Preference claim, credited to operating expense ...........  
(1,000 
(2,000 
— 
Deductions
(*)
.......................................  
(165 
(2,684 
(1,033 
Ending balance 
15,225 
4,128 
4,398 
_________________________________________
(*)
Deductions related to the allowance for doubtful accounts represent amounts written off against the allowance, less 
recoveries. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested