2013
Africa will import
not export
wood.
Change pdf to jpg on - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
changing pdf file to jpg; convert pdf to high quality jpg
Change pdf to jpg on - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg file; batch pdf to jpg converter
Global Environment Fund (GEF) is a global alternative asset manager with approximately $1 billion in assets 
under management. Established in 1990, GEF has grown into one of the world’s most successful investment firms 
dedicated to the energy, environmental, and natural resources sectors.
GEF’s mission is to be the premier alternative asset management firm in the domain of energy, environment, and 
natural resources by delivering favorable risk-adjusted investment returns to our investors over multiple vintage 
years and through varied macroeconomic climates.
GEF was founded on the principle that well-deployed capital can bring significant improvements to the envi-
ronment and quality of life throughout the world, and GEF’s success is a testament to that vision. GEF and its 
employees operate according to the highest standards of corporate governance, ethics, and sustainability.
BACKGROUND AND THESIS
Africa has supplied the world with raw materials for centuries. Along with gold, diamonds, platinum, iron  
ore, salt, copper, coal, tea, coffee and, more recently, oil and gas, Africa has exported wood and wood 
products in large quantities, most notably in the form of tropical hardwood logs and pulp. With approximately 
180 million hectares (ha) of tropical forests in the Congo Basin (the second largest rainforest in the world 
after the Amazon) and a globally significant area of arable land—about half of the world’s remaining undevel-
oped cultivable land—many believe Africa will potentially fill the growing gap between the world’s supply and 
demand for wood.
However, Global Environment Fund’s (GEF’s) close analysis of data from recent research suggests that Africa 
will increasingly become a large net importer of wood products, as opposed to a net exporter. Africa is now 
beginning to experience a wood supply crisis, particularly near population centers close to the coast. In addi-
tion to the implications for Africa itself, this development will have significant ramifications for wood markets 
elsewhere, including trade flows and pricing.
Africa will Import, not Export Wood
Morning at Seaport, Casablanca, Morocco
On the cover: Cape Pine plantation, Jonkershoek, South Africa
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour.
.net pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Web Security. Your PDF and JPG files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
change from pdf to jpg; batch convert pdf to jpg online
DEMAND
There are two major components to wood consumption in Africa, fuel wood and industrial round wood. 
Currently, the total consumption of wood in Africa is about 700 million cubic meters (m
3
) per year—with 
approximately 75 million m
3
consumed for industrial wood products and the remaining 625 million m
3
con-
sumed for fuel wood. While demand for industrial wood in Africa is relatively small, making up only 5% of global 
industrial wood demand, when taken together with the consumption of fuel wood, the continent consumes 
more wood overall than any other region, including North America. In fact, as the exhibit below demonstrates, 
Africa accounts for more than one-fifth of the total 3.5 billion m
3
annual global demand for wood.
Exhibit 1: Total Global Demand for Industrial and Fuel Wood 
(million m3 wood)
Industrial Wood 
Fuel Wood
North
America
South
America
Western 
Europe
Eastern 
Europe
Africa
China
Asia- 
Pacific
Oceana
India  
& Rest  
of Asia
Russian 
Fed.
Source: FAQ, 2009
410
187
72
43
198
602
97
41
194
66
32
377
93
192
113
39
115
202
50
11
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
convert pdf image to jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputDirectory = @"C:\output\"; // Convert tiff to jpg and show How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C#
convert multiple pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg image
2
Global Environment Fund 
DEMAND FOR INDUSTRIAL WOOD: The consumption of sawn wood has grown faster in Africa than in other 
regions of the world during the past 50 years (as shown below in Exhibit 2). In general, population growth 
and economic development are the key drivers of wood demand, and since 2000 Africa has been the 
second fastest growing region in the world after emerging Asia.
Exhibit 2: Change in Global Consumption of Sawn Wood Products Since 1961
% Change Since 1961
350%
300%
250%
200%
150%
100%
50%
0%
-50%
-100%
1962
1968
1974
1980
1986
1992
1998
2004
2010
Africa
South America
Asia
North America
Europe
Source: Data from FAO—FORESTAT
Among the different industrial wood products, the growth in demand for paper, packaging and panels in 
Africa has been even stronger than the demand for sawn wood. African demand for forest products has 
been particularly robust during the last 12 years when its economies grew at a particularly strong rate.
Exhibit 3: Consumption of Forest Product in Africa (m³) Since 1961
(Sawn wood/Panels 000 m
3
, Paper/Packaging 000 tons)
Consumption
20,000
17,500
15,000
12,500
10,000
7,500
5,000
2,500
0
1961
1966
1971
1976
1981
1986
1991
1996
2001
2006
2011
CAGR 3%
CAGR 5%
CAGR 7%
Paper
Packaging
Panels
Sawn wood
Source: Data from FAO—FORESTAT
These population and economic growth rates in Africa are expected to continue for the foreseeable future.  
A recent global study by the consulting group Indufor projects demand for industrial wood in Africa to grow 
from 75 million m
3
in 2010 to 300 million m
3
by 2030, a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of 7.1%.  
In the study, Indufor also calculated a “worst case” scenario of 1.3% CAGR and a more optimistic scenario of 
CAGR 8.6%.
1
However, the 7.1% CAGR base-case scenario seems more reasonable for the following reasons:
Strategic Review on the Future of Forest Plantations, Indufor, Helsinki, Finland, October 4, 2012. Report prepared for Forest Stewardship Council.
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Allow to change converting image with adjusted width & height; Change image resolution Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in
convert pdf page to jpg; convert pdf into jpg format
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
batch pdf to jpg; c# pdf to jpg
3
Africa will Import, not Export Wood
• The African middle class is growing rapidly, as Goldman Sachs recently reported on in detail.
2
This rise in incomes 
will cause demand for numerous wood products, such as housing and furniture, to take a marked upturn. 
• McKinsey has reported that Africa is experiencing high urbanization rates,
3
and this in turn will also increase 
demand for housing, furniture and infrastructure, with wood being an important structural component.
• Economic growth is leading to increased demand for industrial products such as utility poles for power 
lines, fencing and farm posts; timber to support mining operations; and pallets and crates for the transport 
of a broad range of agricultural and other products.
Based on our analysis, we expect a continued high growth rate for industrial wood in Africa.
4
DEMAND FOR FUEL WOOD: According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), some 653 million Africans, 
or about 80% of all African households, relied on fuel wood as their main source of energy for basic needs 
such as heating and cooking in 2009. In rural areas, people use mostly small trees and branches for this fuel 
wood (also known as “green wood”).
Because charcoal is lighter to transport than fuel wood, while delivering the same caloric benefit, it is often 
used for energy in urban areas. With Africa experiencing high urbanization rates averaging around 3% to 4% 
per year, the demand for charcoal is growing accordingly. The manufacturing and transport of charcoal is an 
enormous, but fragmented and mostly unregulated, business.
Recent studies by the World Bank and the European Union estimate that the charcoal industry makes up 2% 
to 3% of the GDP in some African countries, including Tanzania and Uganda.
5
Charcoal is created by putting 
harvested trees through the process of pyrolysis, which extracts water and certain other organic matter 
from wood through slow burning. In most cases, the wood is placed in soil-covered mounds to create an 
anaerobic environment. From start to finish, this process is very energy inefficient—from the unsustainable 
harvesting of wood in the forest through the value chain to manufacturing, transporting and ultimately 
cooking a meal in town.
As shown in Exhibit 4, overall fuel wood consumption in Africa has grown steadily with a compounded rate of 
1.8% during the past 50 years.
Exhibit 4: Historical Fuel Wood Usage in Sub-Saharan Africa Since 1961
(Charcoal converted at 10 m
3
per ton)
3Million m of Wood Utilized
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
1961
1966
1971
1976
1981
1986
1991
1996
2001
2006
2011
CAGR 1.8%
CAGR 1.1%
CAGR 3.3%
Total Fuel wood
Green Fuel wood
Wood Charcoal
Source: FAO—FORESTAT
O’Neill, Jim. How Exciting is Africa’s Potential. Goldman Sachs Asset Management. Goldman Sachs, Oct. 4, 2010. Web. Apr. 18, 2011.
Collier, Paul. The case for investing in Africa. McKinsey. N.p., n.d. Web. May 9, 2011.
For the purpose of this analysis we have adopted the Indufor medium scenario with a 7.1% CAGR up through 2030.
Renewable Energies in Africa, Joint Research Center, European Commission, 2011.
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Users may easily change image size, rotate image angle, set image rotation in dpi Covert JPG & JBIG2 image with high-quality; Provide user-friendly interface
convert pdf file into jpg; pdf to jpeg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg image
4
Global Environment Fund 
Note that charcoal usage in Africa has grown at a CAGR of 3.3% during the last 50 years and is accelerating 
due to urbanization. In addition, because the conversion of wood to charcoal is so inefficient, a great deal of 
wood is required, often using 10 tons of wood to create one ton of charcoal.
Millions of families in other parts of the developing world, including India and China, also rely on biomass as 
their primary energy source. However, while the number of people in developing Asia who rely on biomass 
is falling, the number in Africa is going up. While the share of households in Africa relying on biomass energy 
is expected to decline from 80% to 70% by 2030, the overall consumption is expected to rise due to the 
population growth in Africa. IEA projects that by 2030, 918 million people in sub-Saharan Africa will rely on 
biomass energy—equal to one-third of the total global population relying on biomass energy, and up from 
653 million people in 2009. The table below summarizes these projections.
Exhibit 5: Biomass as a Source of Cooking Fuel Globally
Millions of People Relying on the Traditional Use of Biomass as Their Primary Cooking Fuel
Region
2009 (Actual)
2015
2030
Share of Population on 
Biomass
Rural
Urban
Total
Total
Total
2009
2015
2030
Africa
481
176
657
745
922
67%
65%
61%
Sub-Saharan Africa
477
176
653
741
918
80%
77%
70%
Developing Asia
1,694
243
1,937
1,944
1,769
55%
51%
42%
China
377
47
423
393
280
32%
28%
19%
India
765
90
855
863
780
75%
69%
54%
Other Asia
553
106
659
688
709
63%
60%
52%
Latin America
60
24
85
85
79
18%
17%
14%
Developing Countries*
2,235
444
2,679
2,774
2,770
54%
51%
44%
World**
2,235
444
2,679
2,774
2,770
40%
38%
34%
Africa in % of World
22%
40%
25%      27%      33%
*Includes Middle East countries.
**Includes OECD and transition economies.
Source: Energy and Poverty, Special early excerpt from World Energy Outlook 2010, International Energy Agency.
IEA projects that by 2030, 918 million people 
in sub-Saharan Africa will rely on biomass 
energy—equal to one-third of the total global 
population relying on biomass energy…
Eucalyptus nursery, Mpumalanga, South Africa
5
Africa will Import, not Export Wood
With the continued deforestation and forest degradation in Africa, particularly near population centers, 
charcoal producers have to move farther and farther from cities and towns to find wood. As a result, the 
price of charcoal in Africa has increased significantly during the last several years. The Joint Research Center 
of the EU reported that the charcoal price in Uganda has tripled during the last three years, and the World 
Bank reports similar price increases in Tanzania.
6
GEF’s survey of charcoal prices in Ghana and Nigeria has 
also found prices moving significantly upward.
Factoring the higher growth rate and conversion inefficiency for charcoal, as well as IEA’s projected  
1.6% CAGR of the number of Africans relying on biomass energy in Africa, GEF projects the overall rate of 
consumption of fuel wood in Africa to grow at a CAGR of 1.7%. This is consistent with the overall historical 
growth rate of 1.8%. In fact, we believe it is a conservative projection for the following reasons:
• The reported charcoal consumption levels used in the FAO numbers—which is based on data collected 
and reported by individual governments—are likely to be significantly lower than actual charcoal 
consumption levels. The Joint Research Centre of the United Nations estimated that the actual 
consumption of charcoal may be as much as four times the reported consumption levels.
7
• While we have accounted for the low conversion efficiency of charcoal manufacturing, we have used a 
conservative rate for the penetration level of charcoal relative to the use of green firewood. Beyond the 
rapidly urbanizing areas, charcoal is also becoming more popular in rural areas of Africa.
• The price elasticity in the demand for fuel wood is low. People need to cook their food, and there 
are few better alternatives for much of Africa. Thus, the demand for fuel wood is closely related to 
population growth and demographics, in turn providing good visibility into demand levels for the next 
decade or two.
Overall, when combining the projected demand for industrial wood and fuel wood in Africa, GEF estimates a 
growth rate of 2.6% per year from now until 2030, as shown in the following graph. The total consumption of 
wood is expected to increase from a current level of about 700 million m
3
to nearly 1,200 million m
3
by 2030.
8
Renewable Energies in Africa, Joint Research Center, European Commission, 2011.
Ibid.
Note that this is a “steady state” base-case scenario for African demand, without significant new demand from large industrial biomass energy 
applications and/or exports.
Kilombero Valley Teak Company, Morogoro Region, Tanzania
Eucalyptus plantation, Swaziland
Eucalyptus sawlogs, Mpumalanga, South Africa
6
Global Environment Fund 
Exhibit 6: African Wood Demand
Estimated Total CAGR = 2.6% p.a.
3(in million m)
1,200
1,000
800
600
400
200
0
2010
2015
2020
2025
2030
Industrial (+7% p.a.)
Green Fuel wood (+1% p.a.)
Charcoal (+3% p.a.)
Source: GEF Analysis.
The demand for charcoal in Africa is growing even faster than the demand for “green fuel wood” due to the 
steady rate of urbanization taking place across the continent. The total demand for fuel wood is projected 
to approach 900 million m
3
in 2030, with charcoal surpassing green fuel wood as the largest sub-category 
around 2025.
Growth in overall demand of 2.6% per year might not seem particularly high; however, when viewed in 
comparison to the stagnant sustainable supply of wood in Africa, an alarming picture emerges.
SUPPLY
Where will all the wood that Africa needs come from? There are three possible sources:
1. Natural forests (sustainably and unsustainably harvested)
2. Forest plantations 
3. Net imports
NATURAL FORESTS: Africa has 675 million ha of natural forests, equal to about 17% of total land area. Most 
of the natural forests in Africa are located in the moist tropical forest regions of the Congo Basin, spanning 
the Democratic Republic of Congo, Brazzaville Congo, the Central African Republic, Cameroon, Gabon, and 
Equatorial Guinea.
GEF estimates that about 93.5% of Africa’s wood consumption, or over 650 million m
3
per year, is sourced from 
these natural forests. Practically all the wood used for fuel and about half of the wood used in industry comes 
from natural forests. The growth rate of African natural forests is just enough to replace what is today harvested by 
supplying some 675 million m
3
per year (about 1.0 m
3
per ha per year). However, there is a significant dislocation 
problem; demand will be in urbanized areas where population is expanding rapidly, while the natural forests are 
located far from these areas, with most in the far away Congo Basin. In addition, conflicts and a lack of transport 
infrastructure in the Congo Basin will continue to protect much of its wood from harvesting. 
Africa’s rate of deforestation and degradation—currently about 3.5 million ha per year—will likely not be 
reduced by any significant amount in the next two decades. After “slash and burn” conversion of forests 
to small-scale agriculture, fuel wood—particularly charcoal manufacturing—is the second largest source of 
deforestation in Africa. Inevitably, much of the fuel wood will continue to be unsustainably harvested, causing 
persistent deforestation and forest degradation, especially around coastal urban centers. Deforestation 
spreads much like growing concentric circles around the cities as they grow and new areas urbanize. 
7
Africa will Import, not Export Wood
For the purpose of this analysis, we are categorizing 250 million m
3
as unsustainably harvested out of the 
650 million m3 currently harvested in Africa’s natural forests. However, in reality, the amount of unsustainably 
harvested wood is probably even higher. Regardless of the exact amount, it is clear that rapid urbanization 
will lead to wood shortages and higher prices of charcoal and other wood products in the near term. 
Anecdotal evidence has convinced GEF that significant wood shortages will start to appear in many African 
cities within the next 10 years.
FOREST PLANTATIONS: GEF’s analysis shows that the amount of land in forest plantations in Africa is 
significantly lower even than official estimates would indicate. The FAO estimates that there are more than 
12 million ha of total forest plantations in Africa, an amount that includes both industrial plantations and 
plantations for environmental and protective purposes. However, recent surveys by forest experts indicate 
that the total amount is far smaller. Industrial forest plantations alone cover only 4 million to 5 million ha, 
split evenly between private and government ownership.
9
About 1.3 million ha, or 20% to 25% of this total, 
representing Africa’s highest quality industrial plantations, are located in South Africa.
GEF estimates the total annual production from Africa’s plantations to be about 46 million m
3
, of which 
approximately 40%, or 18 million m
3
, is harvested in South Africa.
10
11 million m
3
of wood harvested from 
South African plantations is processed and exported as pulp and wood chips. The remaining 35 million 
m
3
meets less than one half of the 75 million m
3
demand for industrial wood in Africa. Despite relatively 
low productivity of African forestry plantations
11
compared to plantations in other parts of the world, they 
nonetheless produce about 10 times the sustainable harvest of that derived from natural forests on a per 
hectare basis. The table below summarizes GEF’s estimates.
Exhibit 7: Natural Forest and Plantation Area in Africa
Natural Forests vs. Plantations in Africa
Industrial Plantations
(Condition)
Area
Production/Harvesting
(1,000 ha)
in %
in %
m
3
/ha/yr Mill m
3
Output (%)
Good quality
1,384
36.4%
0.2%
14
19
2.8%
Fair quality
1,113
29.3%
0.2%
12
13
1.9%
Poor quality
1,304
34.3%
0.2%
10
13
1.9%
Total Plantations
3,802
100.0%
0.6%
12
46
6.5%
Natural forests*
674,419
99.4%
1.0
654
93.5%
Total (Natural & Plantations)
678,221
100.0%
1.03
700
100.0%
*Deforestation rate in Africa ~3.5 million ha per year equal to ~0.5%/year.
Source: GEF analysis.
Over the next two decades, the supply gap from industrial plantations in Africa will most likely be larger than 
in the past. As noted in Exhibit 6, the expected CAGR in demand for industrial wood is about 7% through 
2030. In contrast, the CAGR of wood from the establishment of new plantations is expected to be only about 
1%, equivalent to about 40,000 to 50,000 ha per year, according to a recent Indufor survey.
12
Why is the 
establishment rate for new (greenfield) plantations in Africa so low? In short, because such greenfield projects 
are difficult. There are large, fertile and underdeveloped land areas suitable for forest plantations, but private 
investors have not committed significant amounts of money to African timberland investments because of real 
and perceived risks associated with land tenure and sensitivities about communities and conversions.
In the cases where developers have begun greenfield plantations, it will take many years before wood is 
ready to be harvested. Because of this lag, the supply of plantation-grown wood can be estimated up 
through the year 2030. While the establishment of greenfield plantations is expected to be only around 1% 
Pöyry (2011), Indufor (2012) and RISI (2012).
10 
The relatively low average productivity from African plantations is due to the fact that about half of the plantations are government owned and  
generally in poor quality.
11 
African plantations have mean annual increments of 10-12 m3/ha/year.
12 
Strategic Review on the Future of Forest Plantations, Indufor, Helsinki, Finland, October 4, 2012. Report prepared for Forest Stewardship Council.
8
Global Environment Fund 
per year, we have assumed the existing plantations will manage a 2% per year productivity improvement 
due to better plant material, siliviculture practices and forest management in general. As a result, we project 
Africa to have a 3% overall growth in supply of wood from industrial plantations.
NET IMPORTS: Any demand for wood in Africa not covered by harvests from the African natural forests and 
forest plantations will have to be imported. Given demand for industrial wood growing from 77 million m
3
today 
to 300 million m
3
in 2030, and supply growing from 46 million m
3
to 81 million m
3
during the same period, 
forest plantations in Africa will only be able to supply less than 25% of the industrial demand, down from about 
50% today. In reality, even 25% might be on the optimistic side since many of the 2 million ha plantations 
owned by various Africa governments are poorly managed, and may be subjected to deforestation.
GEF expects that the growing supply gap will be met by global wood imports. As shown in Exhibit 8, import 
levels of forest products into Africa have already been increasing in recent years. 
Exhibit 8: Imports of Forest Products into Africa—% Change Since 1961
% Change
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
-100
1991
1993
1995
1997
1999
2001
2003
2005
2007
2009
2011
Paper
Packaging
Wood-Based Panels
Sawn wood
Source: Data from FAO-FORESTAT
GEF expects that the growing supply gap  
will be met by global wood imports.
Eucalyptus plantation, Piggs Peak, Swaziland
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested