asp. net mvc pdf viewer : Changing pdf to jpg on SDK control service wpf azure .net dnn gentraf0-part1721

www.vtpi.org 
Info@vtpi.org 
250-360-1560   
Todd Litman  1998-2015 
You are welcome and encouraged to copy, distribute, share and excerpt this document and its ideas, provided the 
author is given attribution. Please send your corrections, comments and suggestions for improvement.
Generated Traffic and Induced Travel 
Implications for Transport Planning 
27 January 2015 
Todd Litman 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
Abstract 
Traffic congestion tends to maintain equilibrium. Congestion reaches a point at which it 
constrains further growth in peak-period trips. If road capacity increases, the number of 
peak-period trips also increases until congestion again limits further traffic growth. The 
additional travel is called “generated traffic.” Generated traffic consists of diverted traffic 
(trips shifted in time, route and destination), and induced vehicle travel (shifts from other 
modes, longer trips and new vehicle trips). Research indicates that generated traffic 
often fills a significant portion of capacity added to congested urban road.  
Generated traffic has three implications for transport planning. First, it reduces the 
congestion reduction benefits of road capacity expansion. Second, it increases many 
external costs. Third, it provides relatively small user benefits because it consists of 
vehicle travel that consumers are most willing to forego when their costs increase. It is 
important to account for these factors in analysis. This paper defines types of generated 
traffic, discusses generated traffic impacts, recommends ways to incorporate generated 
traffic into evaluation, and describes alternatives to roadway capacity expansion. 
A version of this paper was published in the ITE Journal, Vol. 71, No. 4, Institute of Transportation 
Engineers (www.ite.org), April 2001, pp. 38-47. 
Changing pdf to jpg on - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
to jpeg; convert pdf page to jpg
Changing pdf to jpg on - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf image to jpg online; batch pdf to jpg converter
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
1 
Contents 
Introduction ........................................................................................................... 2 
Defining Generated Traffic .................................................................................... 3 
Measuring Generated Traffic ................................................................................ 7 
Modeling Generated Traffic ................................................................................ 12 
Land Use Impacts ............................................................................................... 15 
Costs of Induced Travel ...................................................................................... 16 
Calculating Consumer Benefits ........................................................................... 18 
Example .............................................................................................................. 20 
Counter Arguments ............................................................................................. 24 
Alternative Strategies for Improving Transport .................................................... 26 
Legal Issues ........................................................................................................ 27 
Conclusions ........................................................................................................ 28 
Resources ........................................................................................................... 29 
This illustration from Asphalt Bulletin magazine shows how roadway expansion tends to 
stimulate automobile travel and the need for more roads. 
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
combine various scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif PDF together and save as new PDF, without changing the previous two PDF documents at
convert pdf images to jpg; .net convert pdf to jpg
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. C#
change format from pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg file
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
2 
Introduction 
Traffic engineers often compare traffic to a fluid, assuming that a certain volume must 
flow through the road system. But urban traffic may be more comparable to a gas that 
expands to fill available space (Jacobsen 1997). Road improvements that reduce travel 
costs attract trips from other routes, times and modes, and encourage longer and more 
frequent travel. This is called generated traffic, referring to additional vehicle traffic on a 
particular road. This consists in part of induced travel, which refers to increased total 
vehicle miles travel (VMT) compared with what would otherwise occur (Hills 1996).  
Generated traffic reflects the economic “law of demand,” which states that consumption 
of a good increases as its price declines. Roadway improvements that alleviate congestion 
reduce the generalized cost of driving (i.e., the price), which encourages more vehicle 
use. Put another way, most urban roads have latent travel demand, additional peak-period 
vehicle trips that will occur if congestion is relieved. In the short-run generated traffic 
represents a shift along the demand curve; reduced congestion makes driving cheaper per 
mile or kilometer in terms of travel time and vehicle operating costs. Over the long run 
induced travel represents an outward shift in the demand curve as transport systems and 
land use patterns become more automobile dependent, so people must drive more to 
maintain a given level of accessibility to goods, services and activities (Lee 1999). 
This is not to suggest that increasing road capacity provides no benefits, but generated 
traffic affects the nature of these benefits. It means that road capacity expansion benefits 
consist more of increased peak-period mobility and less of reduced traffic congestion. 
Accurate transport planning and project appraisal must consider these three impacts: 
1. Generated traffic reduces the predicted congestion reduction benefits of road capacity expansion 
(a type of rebound effect).  
2. Induced travel imposes costs, including downstream congestion, accidents, parking costs, 
pollution, and other environmental impacts. 
3. The additional travel that is generated provides relatively modest user benefits, since it 
consists of marginal value trips (travel that consumers are most willing to forego).  
Ignoring these factors distorts planning decisions. Experts conclude, “…the economic 
value of a scheme can be overestimated by the omission of even a small amount of 
induced traffic. We consider this matter of profound importance to the value-for-money 
assessment of the road programme” (SACTRA 1994). “…quite small absolute changes in 
traffic volumes have a significant impact on the benefit measures. Of course, the 
proportional effect on scheme Net Present Value will be greater still” (Mackie, 1996) and 
The induced travel effects of changes in land use and trip distribution may be critical to 
accurate evaluation of transit and highway alternatives” (Johnston, et al. 2001) 
This paper describes how generated traffic can be incorporated into transport planning. It 
defines different types of generated traffic, discusses their impacts, and describes ways to 
incorporate generated traffic into transport modeling and planning, and provides 
information on strategies for using existing roadway capacity more efficiently.  
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
used commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap format in VB programming code, like changing "tif" to users are also allowed to convert PDF to other
bulk pdf to jpg converter; changing pdf file to jpg
C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert Raster Images (Jpeg/Png/Bmp/Gif)
Give You Sample Codes for Changing and Converting Jpeg, Png RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.jpg"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output
change pdf to jpg on; change pdf file to jpg
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
3 
Defining Generated Traffic 
Generated traffic is the additional vehicle travel that results from a road improvement, 
particularly expansion of congested urban roadways. Congested roads cause people to 
defer trips that are not urgent, choose alternative destinations and modes, and forego 
avoidable trips. Generated traffic consists of diverted travel (shifts in time and route) and 
induced travel (increased total motor vehicle travel). In some situations, highway 
expansion stimulates sprawl (automobile-dependent, urban fringe land use patterns), 
further increasing per capita vehicle travel. If some residents would otherwise choose less 
sprawled housing locations, their additional per capita vehicle travel can be considered to 
be induced by the roadway capacity expansion. 
Below are examples of decisions that generate traffic: 
 Consumers choose closer destinations when roads are congested and further destinations 
when traffic flows more freely. “I want to try the new downtown restaurant but traffic is a 
mess now. Let’s just pick up something at the local deli.” This also affects long-term 
decisions. “We’re looking for a house within 40-minute commute time of downtown. With the 
new highway open, we’ll considering anything as far as Midvalley.” 
 Travelers shift modes to avoid driving in congestion. “The post office is only five blocks away 
and with congestion so bad this time of day, I may as well walk there.” 
 Longer trips may seem cost effective when congestion is light but not when congestion is 
heavy. “We’d save $5 on that purchase at the Wal-Mart across town, but it’s not worth 
fighting traffic so let’s shop nearby.”  
Travel time budget research indicates that increased travel speeds often results in more 
mobility rather than saving time. People tend to average about 75 minutes of daily travel 
time regardless of transport conditions (Levinson and Kumar 1995; Lawton 2001). 
National data indicate that as freeway travel increases, average commute trip distances 
and speeds increase, but trip time stays about constant (Levinson and Kumar 1997). As a 
result, traffic congestion tends to maintain a self-limiting equilibrium: once congestion 
becomes a problem it discourages further growth in peak-period travel. Road expansion 
that reduces congestion in the short term attracts additional peak-period trips until 
congestion once again reaches a level that limits further growth. It may therefore be 
incorrect to claim that congestion reductions save travel time. 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
PowerPoint: PPT, PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Raster Image Files: BMP, GIF, JPG, PNG, JBIG2PDF in or zoom out functions, and changing file rotation
reader pdf to jpeg; changing pdf to jpg file
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
4 
Definitions 
Generated Traffic: Additional peak-period vehicle trips on a particular roadway that occur when 
capacity is increased. This may consist of shifts in travel time, route, mode, destination and frequency.  
Induced travel: An increase in total vehicle mileage due to roadway improvements that increase vehicle 
trip frequency and distance, but exclude travel shifted from other times and routes. 
Latent demand: Additional trips that would be made if travel conditions improved (less congested, 
higher design speeds, lower vehicle costs or tolls). 
Triple Convergence: Increased peak-period vehicle traffic volumes that result when roadway capacity 
increases, due to shifts from other routes, times and modes. 
Figure 1 illustrates this pattern. Traffic volumes grow until congestion develops, then the 
growth rate declines and achieves equilibrium, indicated by the curve becoming 
horizontal. A demand projection made during this growth period will indicate that more 
capacity is needed, ignoring the tendency of traffic volumes to eventually level off. If 
additional lanes are added there will be another period of traffic growth as predicted. 
Figure 1 
How Road Capacity Expansion Generates Traffic 
0
1
2
Time   ---->
Traffic Lanes and Volume
Traffic Volume With Added Capacity
Traffic Volume Without Added Capacity
Generated 
Traffic
Projected 
Traffic  
Growth
Roadway 
Capacity 
Added
Traffic grows when roads are uncongested, but the growth rate declines as congestion develops, 
reaching a self-limiting equilibrium (indicated by the curve becoming horizontal). If capacity 
increases, traffic grows until it reaches a new equilibrium. This additional peak-period vehicle travel 
is called “generated traffic.” The portion that consists of absolute increases in vehicle travel (as 
opposed to shifts in time and route) is called “induced travel.” 
Generated traffic can be considered from two perspectives. Project planners are primarily 
concerned with the traffic generated on the expanded road segment, since this affects the 
project’s congestion reduction benefits. Others may be concerned with changes in total 
vehicle travel (induced travel) which affects overall benefits and costs. Table 1 describes 
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
5 
various types of generated traffic. In the short term, most generated traffic consists of 
trips diverted from other routes, times and modes, called Triple Convergence (Downs 
1992). Over the long term an increasing portion is induced travel. In some situations, 
adding roadway capacity can reduce the network’s overall efficiency, a phenomena called 
Braess’s Paradox (Youn, Jeong and Gastner 2008).  
Highway capacity expansion can induce additional vehicle travel on adjacent roads 
(Hansen, et al. 1993) by stimulating more dispersed, automobile-dependent development. 
Although these indirect impacts are difficult to quantify they are potentially large and 
should be considered in transport planning (Louis Berger & Assoc. 1998). 
Table 1 
Types of Generated Traffic 
Type of Generated Traffic 
Category 
Time  
Frame 
Travel 
Impacts 
Cost 
Impacts 
Shorter Route 
Improved road allows drivers to use more direct route. 
Diverted trip 
Short term 
Small 
reduction 
Reduction 
Longer Route 
Improved road attracts traffic from more direct routes. 
Diverted trip 
Short term 
Small increase Slight increase 
Time Change 
Reduced peak period congestion reduces the need to 
defer trips to off-peak periods. 
Diverted trip. 
Short term 
None 
Slight increase 
Mode Shift; Existing Travel Choices 
Improved traffic flow makes driving relatively more 
attractive than other modes. 
Induced 
vehicle trip 
Short term 
Increased 
driving 
Moderate to 
large increase 
Mode Shift; Changes in Travel Choice 
Less demand leads to reduced rail and bus service, less 
suitable conditions for walking and cycling, and more 
automobile ownership. 
Induced 
vehicle trip 
Long term 
Increased 
driving, 
reduced 
alternatives 
Large increase, 
reduced equity 
Destination Change; Existing Land Use 
Reduced travel costs allow drivers to choose farther 
destinations. No change in land use patterns. 
Longer trip 
Short term 
Increase 
Moderate to 
large increase 
Destination Change; Land Use Changes 
Improved access allows land use changes, especially 
urban fringe development. 
Longer trip 
Long term 
More driving 
and auto 
dependency 
Moderate to 
large increase, 
equity costs 
New Trip; No Land Use Changes 
Improved travel time allows driving to substitute for 
non-travel activities. 
Induced trip 
Short term 
Increase 
Large increase 
Automobile Dependency 
Synergetic effects of increased automobile oriented 
land use and transportation system. 
Induced trip 
Long term 
Increased 
driving, fewer 
alternatives 
Large increase, 
reduced equity 
Some types of generated traffic represent diverted trips (trips shifted from other times or routes) 
while others increase total vehicle travel, reduce travel choices, and affect land use patterns.  
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
6 
What constitutes short- and long-term impacts can vary. Some short term effects, such as 
mode shifts, may accumulate over several years, and some long term effects, such as 
changes in development patterns, can begin almost immediately after a project is 
announced if market conditions are suitable. Roadway expansion impacts tend to include: 
 First order. Reduced congestion delay, increased traffic speeds. 
 Second order. Changes in travel time, route, destination and mode to take advantage of the 
increased speeds. 
 Third order. Land use changes. More dispersed, automobile-oriented development. 
 Fourth order. Overall increase in automobile dependency. Degraded walking and cycling 
conditions (due to wider roads and increased traffic volumes), reduced public transit service 
quality (due to reduced demand and associated scale economies, sometimes called the 
Downs-Thomson paradox), and social stigma associated with alternative modes (Noland and 
Hanson 2013, p. 75). 
Such impacts can also occur in reverse: if urban roadway capacity is reduced a portion of 
previous vehicle traffic may disappear altogether (Cairns, Hass-Klau and Goodwin 1998; 
Cervero 2006; CNU 2011; ITDP 2012; Miller 2006) which is sometimes called traffic 
evaporation (EC 2004). 
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
7 
Measuring Generated Traffic 
Several studies using various analysis methods have quantified generated traffic and 
induced travel impacts (Handy and Boarnet 2014; Noland and Hanson 2013). Their 
findings are summarized below: 
 Cervero (2003a & b) used data on freeway capacity expansion, traffic volumes, demographic 
and geographic factors from California between 1980 and 1994. He estimated the long-term 
elasticity of VMT with respect to traffic speed to be 0.64, meaning that a 10% increase in 
speed results in a 6.4% increase in VMT, and that about a quarter of this results from changes 
in land use (e.g., additional urban fringe development). He estimated that about 80% of 
additional roadway capacity is filled with additional peak-period travel, about half of which 
(39%) can be considered the direct result of the added capacity. 
 Duranton and Turner (2008) investigate the relationship between interstate highway lane-
kilometers and highway vehicle-kilometers travelled (VKT) in US cities. They found that 
VKT increases proportionately to highways and identify three important sources for this extra 
vehicle travel: increased driving by current residents, an inflow of new residents, and more 
transport intensive production activity. They find aggregate city-level VKT demand to be 
elastic and so conclude that, without congestion pricing, increasing road or public transit 
supply is unlikely to relieve congestion, and current roadway supply exceeds the optimum. 
 Handy and Boarnet (2014) performed a critical evaluation of various induced travel studies. 
They found short-run elasticity effects of increased highway capacity generally range from 
0.3 to 0.6, although one study produced a lower estimate of 0.1. Estimates of the long-run 
effect of increased highway capacity are considerably higher, mostly falling into the range 
from 0.6 to just over 1.0. The more recent studies have produced the highest estimates of 
long-run elasticities using more sophisticated methodologies that are better able to illuminate 
the impact of highway capacity on VMT. They therefore conclude that the best estimate for 
the long-run effect of highway capacity on VMT is an elasticity close to 1.0, implying that in 
congested metropolitan areas, adding new capacity to the existing system of limited access 
highways is unlikely to reduce congestion or associated GHG in the long-run.  
 Time-series travel data for various roadway types indicates an elasticity of vehicle travel with 
respect to lane miles of 0.5 in the short run, and 0.8 in the long run (Noland 2001). This 
means that half of increased roadway capacity is filled with added travel within about 5 years, 
and that 80% of the increased roadway capacity will be filled eventually. Urban roads, which 
tend to be most congested, had higher elasticity values than rural roads, as would be expected 
due to the greater congestion and latent demand in urban areas
 The medium-term elasticity of highway traffic with respect to California state highway 
capacity was measured to be 0.6-0.7 at the county level and 0.9 at the municipal level 
(Hansen and Huang 1997). This means that 60-90% of increased road capacity is filled with 
new traffic within five years. Total vehicle travel increased 1% for every 2-3% increase in 
highway lane miles. The researcher concludes, “it appears that adding road capacity does 
little to decrease congestion because of the substantial induced traffic” (Hansen 1995). 
Mokhtarian, et al (2002) applied a different statistical technique (matched-pairs) to the same 
data and found no significant induced travel effect, but that technique does not account for 
additional traffic on other roads or control for other factors that may affect vehicle travel. 
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
8 
 Leading U.K. transportation economists concludes that the elasticity of travel volume with 
respect to travel time is -0.5 in the short term and -1.0 over the long term (SACTRA 1994). 
This means that reducing travel time on a roadway by 20% typically increases traffic volumes 
by 10% in the short term and 20% over the long term. 
 The following are elasticity values for vehicle travel with respect to travel time: urban roads, 
short-term -0.27, long term  –0.57; rural roads, short term  –0.67, long term –1.33 (Goodwin 
1996).
These values are used in the FHWA’s SMITE software program described below. 
 A Transportation Research Board report based finds consistent evidence of generated traffic, 
particularly with respect to travel time savings (Cohen 1995).  
 National Highway Institute concludes that the elasticity of highway travel with respect to 
users’ generalized cost (travel time and financial expenses) is typically -0.5 (NHI 1995). 
 Analysis of traffic conditions in 70 metropolitan areas finds that regions which invested 
heavily in road capacity expansion fared no better in reducing congestion than those that 
spent far less (STPP 1998). The researchers estimate that road capacity investments of 
thousands of dollars annually per household would be needed achieve congestion reductions. 
 Noland and Mohammed A. Quddus (2006) found that increases in road space or traffic signal 
control systems that smooth traffic flow tend to induce additional vehicle traffic which quickly 
diminish any initial emission reduction benefits. 
 Cross-sectional time-series analysis of traffic growth in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic region found an 
average elasticities of VMT with respect to lane miles to be 0.2 to 0.6 (Noland and Lem 2002). 
 The USDOT Highway Economic Requirements System (HERS) investment analysis model 
uses a travel demand elasticity factor of –0.8 for the short term, and –1.0 for the long term, 
meaning that if users’ generalized costs (travel time and vehicle expenses) decrease by 10%, 
travel is predicted to increase 8% within 5 years, and an additional 2% within 20 years (Lee, 
Klein and Camus 1998; FHWA 2000). 
 Cervero and Hanson (2000) found the elasticity of VMT with respect to lane-miles to be 0.56, 
and an elasticity of lane-miles with respect to VMT of 0.33, indicating that roadway capacity 
expansion results in part from anticipated traffic growth.  
 A comprehensive study of the impacts of urban design factors on U.S. vehicle travel found 
that a 10% increase in urban road density (lane-miles per square mile) increases per capita 
annual VMT by 0.7% (Barr 2000).  
 In a study of eight new urban highways in Texas over several years, Holder and Stover 
(1972) found evidence of induced travel at six locations, estimated to represent 5-12% of total 
corridor volume, representing from a quarter to two-thirds of traffic on the facility. Henk 
(1989) performed similar analysis at 34 sites and found similar results. 
 Yao and Morikawa (2005) develop a model of induced demand resulting from high speed rail 
service improvements between major Japanese cities. They calculate elasticities of induced 
travel (trips and VMT) with respect to fares, travel time, access time and service frequency 
for business and nonbusiness travel. 
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
9 
 Modeling analysis indicates that adding an urban beltway can increase regional VMT by 0.8-
1.1% for each 1.0% increase in lane capacity (Rodier, et al. 2001). 
Table 2 
Portion of New Capacity Absorbed by Induced Traffic 
Author 
Short-term 
Long-term (3+ years) 
SACTRA 
50 - 100% 
Goodwin  
28% 
57% 
Johnson and Ceerla  
60 - 90% 
Hansen and Huang 
90% 
Fulton, et al. 
10 - 40% 
50 - 80% 
Marshall 
76 - 85% 
Noland  
20 - 50% 
70 - 100% 
 Odgers (2009) found that traffic speeds on Melbourne, Australia freeways did not decline as 
predicted following new urban highway construction, apparently due to induced traffic. He 
concludes that, “major road infrastructure initiatives and the consequent economic 
investments have not yet delivered a net economic benefit to either Melbourne’s motorists or 
the Victorian community.”  
 Burt and Hoover (2006) found that each 1% increase in road lane-kilometres per driving-age 
person increases per capita light truck travel 0.49% and car travel 0.27%, although they report 
that these relationships are not statistically significant, falling just outside the 80% confidence 
interval for cars and the 90% confidence interval for light trucks. 
 Hymel, Small and Van Dender (2010) used U.S. state-level cross-sectional time series data 
for 1966 through 2004 to evaluate the effects of various factors including incomes, fuel price, 
road supply and traffic congestion on vehicle travel. They find the elasticity of vehicle travel 
with respect to statewide road density (based on 2004 vehicle ownership rates and incomes) 
is 0.019 in the short run and 0.093 in the long run (a 10% increase in total lane-miles per 
square mile increases state vehicle mileage by 0.19% in the short run and 0.93% in the long 
run), and with respect to total road miles is 0.037 in the short run and 0.186 in the long run (a 
10% increase in lane-miles causes state VMT to increase 0.37% in the short run and 1.86% 
over the long run),  and the elasticity of vehicle use with respect to congestion is -0.045 (a 
10% increase in total regional congestion reduces regional mileage 0.45% over the long run), 
but this increases with income, assumedly because the opportunity cost of time increases with 
wealth, and so is estimated to be 0.078 at 2004 income levels (a 10% increase in total 
regional congestion reduces regional mileage by 0.78% over the long run). Their analysis 
indicates that long-run travel elasticities are typically 3.4–9.4 times the short-run elasticities.  
 The Handbook of Transportation Engineering urban highway capacity expansion often fails to 
significantly increase travel times and speeds due to latent demand (Kockelman 2010). A 
review of published literature indicates long-run elasticities of demand for roadspace (vehicle 
miles traveled) are generally 0.5 to 1.0 after controlling for population growth and income, with 
values of almost 1.0 (suggesting that new roadspace is almost precisely filled by generated 
traffic where congestion is relatively severe. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested