Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
20 
Example 
A four-lane, 10-kilometer highway connects a city with nearby suburbs. The highway is 
congested 1,000 hours per year in each direction. Regional travel demand is predicated to 
grow at 2% per year. A proposal is made to expand the highway to six lanes, costing $25 
million in capital expenses and adding $1 million in annual highway operating expenses.  
Figure 5 illustrates predicted traffic volumes. Without the project peak-hour traffic is 
limited to 4,000 vehicles in each direction, the maximum capacity of the two-lane 
highway. If generated traffic is ignored the model predicts that traffic volumes will grow 
at a steady 2% per year if the project is implemented. If generated traffic is considered 
the model predicts faster growth, including the basic 2% growth plus additional growth 
due to generated traffic, until volumes levels off at 6,000 vehicles per hour, the maximum 
capacity of three lanes. 
Figure 5 
Projected Traffic  
0
1,000
2,000
3,000
4,000
5,000
6,000
0 1 2 3 4 5 5 6 6 7 8 9 9 10 0 11 1 12 2 13 3 14 15
Years  ==>
Trips Per Peak Hour
3 Lanes, Considering Generated Traffic
3 Lanes, Ignoring Generated Traffic
2 Lanes
If generated traffic is ignored the model predicts that traffic volumes will grow at a steady 2% 
per year if the project is implemented. If generated traffic is considered the model predicts a 
higher initial growth rate, which eventually declines when the road once again reaches capacity 
and becomes congested. (Based on the “Moderate Latent Demand” curve from Figure 3) 
The model divides generated traffic into diverted trips (changes in trip time, route and 
mode) and induced travel (increased trips and trip length), using the assumption that the 
first year’s generated traffic represents diverted trips and later generated traffic represents 
induced travel. This simplification appears reasonable since diverted trips tend to occur in 
the short-term, while induced travel is associated with longer-term changes in consumer 
behavior and land use patterns. 
Roadway volume to capacity ratios are used to calculate peak-period traffic speeds, 
which are then used to calculate travel time and vehicle operating cost savings. 
Congestion reduction benefits are predicted to be significantly greater if generated traffic 
is ignored, as illustrated in Figure 6. 
Change pdf to jpg format - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf photo to jpg; conversion pdf to jpg
Change pdf to jpg format - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
best program to convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg online
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
21 
Figure 6 
Projected Average Traffic Speeds 
0
20
40
60
80
100
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 0 11 12 13 3 14 15
Years  ==>
Average Traffic Speed (km/hr)
Ignoring Generated Traffic
Considering Generated Traffic
Ignoring generated traffic exaggerates future traffic speeds and congestion reduction benefits. 
Incremental external costs are assumed to average 10¢ per vehicle-km for diverted trips 
(shifts in time, route and mode) and 30¢ per vehicle-km for induced travel (longer and 
increased trips). User benefits of generated traffic are calculated using the Rule-of-Half.  
Three cases where considered for sensitivity analysis. Most Favorable uses assumptions 
most favorable to the project, Medium uses values considered most likely, and Least 
Favorable uses values least favorable to the project. Table 7 summarizes the analysis. 
Table 7 
Analysis of Three Cases 
Data Input 
Most 
Favorable 
Medium 
Least 
Favorable 
Generated Traffic Growth Rate (from Figure 3) 
Discount Rate 
6% 
6% 
6% 
Maximum Peak Vehicles Per Lane 
2,200  
2,000  
1,800  
Before Average Traffic Speed (km/hr) 
40 
50 
60  
After Average Traffic Speed (km/hr) 
110 
100  
90  
Value of Peak-Period Travel Time (per veh-hr) 
$12.00  
$8.00  
$6.00  
Vehicle Operating Costs (per km) 
$0.15  
$0.12  
$0.10  
Annual Lane Hours at Capacity Each Direction 
1,200 
1,000 
800 
Diverted Trip External Costs (per km) 
$0.00  
$0.10  
$0.15  
Induced Travel External Costs (per km) 
$0.20  
$0.30  
$0.50  
Net Present Value (millions) 
NPV Without Consideration of Generated Traffic 
$204.8 
$45.2 
-$9.8 
NPV With Consideration of Generated Traffic 
$124.5 
-$32.1 
-$95.7 
Difference 
-$80.3 
-$77.3 
-$85.8 
Benefit/Cost Ratio 
Without Generated Traffic 
6.90 
2.30 
0.72 
With Generated Traffic 
3.37 
0.59 
0.11 
This table summarizes the assumptions used in this analysis. 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
try out some settings and then create the PDF files with the button at the bottom. The perfect conversion tool. JPG is the most widely used image format, but we
convert pdf to jpeg on; pdf to jpg converter
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
JPG is the most common image format on the internet. The outputs of our conversion service are always JPG files to even if pictures are saved in a PDF in other
change pdf file to jpg; convert multi page pdf to jpg
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
22 
The most favorable assumptions result in a positive B/C even when generated traffic is 
considered. The medium assumptions result in a positive B/C if generated traffic is 
ignored but a negative NPV if generated traffic is considered. The least favorable 
assumptions result in a negative B/C even when generated traffic is ignored. In each case, 
considering generated traffic has significant impacts on the results. 
Figure 7 illustrates project benefits and costs based on “Medium” assumptions, ignoring 
generated traffic. This results in a positive NPV of $45.2 million, implying that the 
project is economically worthwhile. 
Figure 7 
Estimated Costs and Benefits, Ignoring Generated Traffic 
Years  ==>
Costs and Benefits
Vehicle Operating Cost Savings
Travel Time Savings
Project Costs
This figure illustrates annual benefits and costs when generated traffic is ignored, using 
“Medium” assumptions. Benefits are bars above the baseline, costs are bars below the baseline. 
Project expenses are the only cost category.  
Figure 8 illustrates project evaluation when generated traffic is considered. Congestion 
reduction benefits decline, and additional external costs and consumer benefits are 
included. The NPV is  –$32.1 million, indicating the project is not worthwhile. 
Figure 8 
Estimated Costs and Benefits, Considering Generated Traffic 
Years  ==>
Costs and Benefits
Generated Travel Benefits
Vehicle Operating Cost Savings
Travel Time Savings
Induced Travel External Costs
Diverted Trip External Costs
Project Expenses
This figure illustrates benefits and costs when generated traffic is considered, using medium 
assumptions. Benefits are bars above the baseline, costs are bars below the baseline. It includes 
consumer benefits and external costs associated with generated traffic. Travel time and vehicle 
operating cost savings end after about 10 years, when traffic volumes per lane return to pre-
project levels, resulting in no congestion reduction benefits after that time.  
JPEG Image Viewer| What is JPEG
JPEG, JPG. Disadvantages of JPEG Format. Lossy compression, somewhat reduces the image quality other file formats, including Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
convert pdf page to jpg; changing pdf file to jpg
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp load a program with an incorrect format", please check You can also directly change PDF to Gif image file
convert multiple pdf to jpg online; convert pdf to jpg for online
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
23 
This analysis indicates how generated traffic can have significant impacts on project 
assessment. Ignoring generated traffic exaggerates the benefits of highway capacity 
expansion by overestimating congestion reduction benefits and ignoring incremental 
external costs from generated traffic. This tends to undervalue alternatives such as road 
pricing, TDM programs, other modes, and “do nothing” options.  
For example, Figure 9 compares three possible responses to congestion on a corridor with 
increasing traffic demand. Do nothing causes traffic congestion costs to increase over 
time. Expanding general traffic lanes imposes large initial costs due to construction 
delays, but provides large short-term congestion reduction benefits. However, these 
decline over time, due to induced traffic, and the additional vehicle travel imposes 
additional external costs including downstream congestion, increased parking demand, 
accident risk and pollution emissions. Building grade-separated public transit (either a 
bus lane or rail line) also imposes short-run congestion delays, and the congestion 
reduction benefits are relatively small in the short term but increase over time as transit 
ridership grows, networks expand, and development becomes more transit-oriented.  
Figure 9 
Road Widening Versus Transit Congestion Impacts 
Years ==>
Costs and Benefits
Do Nothing
Highway Expansion
Public Transit
Construction
A Do Nothing causes congestion costs to increase in the future. Highway expansion imposes 
short term construction delays, then large congestion reduction benefits, but these decline over 
time due to generated traffic. Grade-separated public transit provides smaller benefits in the 
short-term but these increase over time as public transit ridership grows. 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
to load a program with an incorrect format", please check Add(new Bitmap(Program. RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with
convert multiple pdf to jpg; change format from pdf to jpg
C# Image: How to Download Image from URL in C# Project with .NET
If you want other format, you can use the image you can also save a gif, jpeg / jpg, or bmp provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
to jpeg; convert pdf file into jpg
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
24 
Counter Arguments 
“Widening roads to ease congestion is like trying to cure obesity by loosening your belt” Roy 
Kienitz, executive director of the Surface Transportation Policy Project 
“Increasing highway capacity is equivalent to giving bigger shoes to growing children” Robert 
Dunphy of the Urban Land Institute 
Some highway expansion advocates argue that generated traffic has minor implications 
for transport planning decisions. They argue that increased highway capacity contributes 
little to overall growth in vehicle travel compared with other factors such as increased 
population, employment and income (Heanue 1998; Sen 1998; Burt and Hoover 2006), 
that although new highways generate traffic, they still provide net economic benefits 
(ULI 1989), and that increasing roadway capacity does reduce congestion (TRIP 1999; 
Bayliss 2008). 
These arguments ignore critical issues, and are often based on outdated data and 
inaccurate analysis. Overall travel trends indicate little about the cost effectiveness of 
particular policies and projects. For example, studies which indicate that, in the past, 
increased lane-miles caused minimal growth in vehicle travel (Burt and Hoover 2006), 
provide little guidance for future planning, since, in the past, much of the added highway 
lane-miles occurred on uncongested rural highways while most future highway expansion 
occurs on congested urban highways. Strategies that encourage more efficient use of 
existing capacity, such as commute trip reduction programs and road pricing, may 
provide greater social benefits, particularly considering all costs (Goodwin 1997).  
Highway expansion advocates generally ignore or severely understate generated traffic 
and induced travel impacts. For example, Cox and Pisarski (2004) use a model that 
accounts for diverted traffic (trips shifted in time or route) but ignores shifts in mode, 
destination and trip frequency. Hartgen and Fields (2006) assume that generated traffic 
would fill just 15% of added roadway capacity, based on generated traffic rates during 
the 1960s and 1970s, which is unrealistically low when extremely congested roads are 
expanded. They ignore the incremental costs that result from induced vehicle travel, such 
as increased downstream traffic congestion, road and parking costs, accidents and 
pollution emissions. They claim that roadway capacity expansion reduces fuel 
consumption, pollution emissions and accidents, because they measure impacts per 
vehicle-mile and ignore increased vehicle miles. As a result they significantly exaggerate 
roadway expansion benefits and understate total costs. 
Debates over generated traffic and its implications often reflect ideological perspectives 
concerning whether automobile travel (and therefore road capacity expansion) is “good” 
or “bad”. To an economist, such arguments are silly. Some automobile travel provides 
large net benefits (high user value, poor alternatives, low external costs), and some 
provides negative net benefits (low user value, good alternatives, and large external 
costs). The efficient solution to congestion is to use pricing or other incentives to test 
consumers’ willingness to pay for road space and capacity expansion.  
VB.NET Word: Word to JPEG Image Converter in .NET Application
Word doc into high quality jpeg / jpg images; Convert a be converted into Jpeg image format and then powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; .pdf to .jpg online
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Powerful .NET control to batch convert PDF documents to tiff format in Visual C# .NET program. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images.
convert from pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
25 
If consumers only demand roadway improvements when they are shielded from the true 
costs, such projects are likely to be economically inefficient. Only if users are willing to 
pay the full incremental costs their vehicle use imposes can society be sure that increased 
road capacity and the additional vehicle travel that results provides net benefits. Travel 
demand predictions based on underpriced roads overestimate the economically optimal 
level of roadway investments and capacity expansion. Increasing capacity in such cases is 
more equivalent to loosening a belt than giving a growing child larger shoes (see quotes 
above), since the additional vehicle travel is a luxury and economically inefficient. 
Some highway advocates suggest there are equity reasons to subsidize roadway capacity 
expansion, to allow lower-income households access to more desirable locations, but 
most benefits from increased roadway capacity are captured by middle- and upper-
income households (Deakin, et al. 1996). Improving travel choices for non-drivers tends 
to have greater equity benefits than subsidizing additional highway capacity since 
physically and economically disadvantaged people often rely on alternative modes. 
Although highway projects are often justified for the sake of economic development, 
highway capacity expansion now provides little net economic benefit (Boarnet 1997). An 
expert review concluded, “The available evidence does not support arguments that new 
transport investment in general has a major impact on economic growth in a country with 
an already well-developed infrastructure” (SACTRA 1997). Melo, Graham and Canavan 
(2012) found a positive relationship between U.S. urban highway expansion and 
economic output between 1982 and 2009, but conclude that other types of transportation 
system improvements could provide greater net benefits. 
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
.pdf to .jpg converter online; convert pdf to jpg c#
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
change pdf to jpg file; convert pdf to jpg converter
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
26 
Alternative Transport Improvement Strategies 
Since roadway capacity expansion provides smaller net benefits than is often recognized, 
due to the effects of generated traffic, other solutions to transportation problems may 
provide relatively more benefits. A “No Build” option may become more attractive since 
peak-period traffic volumes will simply level off without additional capacity. This can 
explain, for example, why urban commute travel times are virtually unchanged despite 
increases in traffic congestion, and why urban regions that have made major investments 
in highway capacity expansion have not experienced significant reductions in traffic 
congestion (Gordon and Richardson 1994; STPP 1998). 
Consideration of generated traffic gives more value to transportation systems 
management and transportation demand management strategies that result in more 
efficient use of existing roadway capacity. These strategies cannot individually solve all 
transportation problems, but a package of them can, often with less costs and greater 
overall benefit than highway capacity expansion. Below are examples (VTPI 2001): 
 Congestion pricing can provide travelers with an incentive to reduce their peak period trips 
and use travel alternatives, such as ridesharing and non-motorized transport. 
 Commute trip reduction programs can provide a framework for encouraging commuters to 
drive less and rely more on travel alternatives. 
 Land use management can increase access by bringing closer common destinations. 
 Pedestrian and cycle improvements can increase mobility and access, and support other 
modes such as public transit (since transit users also depend on walking and cycling). 
 Public transit service that offers door-to-door travel times and user costs that are competitive 
with driving can attract travelers from a parallel highway, limiting the magnitude of traffic 
congestion on that corridor.
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
27 
Legal Issues 
Environmental groups successfully sued the Illinois transportation agencies for failing to 
consider land use impacts and generated traffic in the Environmental Impact Statement 
(EIS) for I-355, a proposed highway extension outside the city of Chicago (Sierra Club 
1997). The federal court concluded that the EIS was based on the “implausible” 
assumption that population in the rural areas would grow by the same amount with and 
without the tollroad, even though project was promoted as a way to stimulate growth. The 
court concluded that this circular reasoning afflicted the document’s core findings. The 
judge required the agencies to prepare studies identifying the amount of development the 
tollroad would cause, and compare this with alternatives. The Court’s order states: 
Plaintiffs’ argument is persuasive. Highways create demand for travel and expansion by their 
very existence…Environmental laws are not arbitrary hoops through which government 
agencies must jump. The environmental regulations at issue in this case are designed to ensure 
that the public and government agencies are well informed about the environmental 
consequences of proposed actions. The environmental impact statements in this case fail in 
several significant respects to serve this purpose. (ELCP) 
In 2008 the California Attorney General recognized that regional transportation plans 
must consider induced travel impacts when evaluating the climate change impacts of 
individual projects to meet California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requirements 
(Brown 2008). CEQA requires that “[e]ach public agency shall mitigate or avoid the 
significant effects on the environment of projects that it carries out or approves whenever 
it is feasible to do so.” The state Attorney General recognizes that transportation planning 
decisions, such as highway expansion projects, can have significant emission impacts due 
to induced vehicle travel.  
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
28 
Conclusions 
Urban traffic congestion tends to maintain equilibrium. Congestion reaches a point at 
which it discourages additional peak-period trips. Increasing road capacity allows more 
vehicle travel to occur. In the short term this consists primarily of generated traffic: 
vehicle travel diverted from other times, modes, routes and destinations. Over the long 
run an increasing portion consists of induced vehicle travel, resulting in a total increase in 
regional VMT. This has several implications for transport planning: 
 Ignoring generated traffic underestimates the magnitude of future traffic congestion 
problems, overestimates the congestion reduction benefits of increasing roadway capacity, 
and underestimates the benefits of alternative solutions to transportation problems.  
 Induced travel increases many external costs. Over the long term it helps create more 
automobile dependent transportation systems and land use patterns. 
 The mobility benefits of generated traffic are relatively small since they consist of marginal 
value trips. Much of the benefits are often capitalized into land values. 
Ignoring generated traffic results in self-fulfilling predict and provide planning: Planners 
extrapolate traffic growth rates to predict that congestion will reach gridlock unless 
capacity expands. Adding capacity generates traffic, which leads to renewed congestion 
with higher traffic volumes, and more automobile oriented transport and land use 
patterns. This cycle continues until road capacity expansion costs become unacceptable.  
The amount of traffic generated depends on specific conditions. Expanding highly 
congested roads with considerable latent demand tends to generate significant amounts of 
traffic, providing only temporary congestion reductions.  
Generated traffic does not mean that roadway expansion provides no benefits and should 
never be implemented. However, ignoring generated traffic results in inaccurate forecasts 
of impacts and benefits. Road projects considered cost effective by conventional analysis 
may actually provide little long-term benefit to motorists and make society overall worse 
off due to generated traffic. Other strategies may be better overall. Another implication is 
that highway capacity expansion projects should incorporate strategies to avoid 
increasing external costs, such as more stringent vehicle emission regulations to avoid 
increasing pollution and land use regulations to limit sprawl. 
Framing the Congestion Question 
If you ask people, “Do you think that traffic congestion is a serious problem?” they frequently answer 
yes. If you ask, “Would you rather solve congestion problems by improving roads or by using 
alternatives such as congestion tolls and other TDM strategies?” a smaller majority would probably 
choose the road improvement option. This is how transport choices are generally framed.  
But if you present the choices more realistically by asking, “Would you rather spend a lot of money to 
increase road capacity to achieve moderate and temporary congestion reductions and bear higher 
future costs from increased motor vehicle traffic, or implement other types of transportation 
improvements?” the preference for road building might disappear.
Generated Traffic: Implications for Transport Planning 
Victoria Transport Policy Institute 
29 
References and Information Resources 
John Abraham (1998), Review of the MEPLAN Modelling Framework from a Perspective of 
Urban Economics, Civil Engineering Research Report CE98-2, U. of Calgary, 
(www.acs.ucalgary.ca/~jabraham/MEPLAN_and_Urban_Economics.PDF). 
ADB (2010), Reducing Carbon Emissions from Transport Projects, Asian Development Bank 
(www.adb.org); at www.adb.org/evaluation/reports/ekb-carbon-emissions-transport.asp.  
Richard Arnott and Kenneth Small (1994), “The Economics of Traffic Congestion,” American 
Scientist, Vol. 82, Sept./ Oct. 1994, pp. 446-455. 
Lawrence C. Barr (2000), “Testing for the Significance of Induced Highway Travel Demand in 
Metropolitan Areas,” Transportation Research Record 1706, Transportation Research Board 
(www.trb.org); at http://trb.metapress.com/content/lq766w66540p7432/fulltext.pdf.  
David Bayliss (2008), Misconceptions and Exaggerations about Roads and Road Building in 
Great Britain, Royal Automobile Club Foundation 
(www.racfoundation.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=597&Itemid=35
Marlon Boarnet (1997), “New Highways & Economic Productivity: Interpreting Recent 
Evidence,” Journal of Planning Literature, Vol. 11, No. 4, May 1997, pp. 476-486. 
Marlon Boarnet (1997), Direct and Indirect Economic Effects of Transportation Infrastructure
UCTC (www.uctc.net). 
Marlon Boarnet and Saksith Tan Chalermpong (2002), New Highways, Induced Travel and 
Urban Growth Patterns: A "Before and After" Test, Paper 559, University of California 
Transportation Center (www.uctc.net). 
Edward Beimborn, Rob Kennedy and William Schaefer (1996), Inside the Blackbox: Making 
Transportation Models Work for Livable Communities, Center for Urban Transportation Studies 
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (www.uwm.edu/Dept/CUTS); at 
http://ctr.utk.edu/TNMUG/misc/blackbox.pdf
Antonio M. Bento, Maureen L. Cropper, Ahmed Mushfiq Mobarak and Katja Vinha (2003), The 
Impact of Urban Spatial Structure on Travel Demand in the United States, World Bank Group 
Working Paper 2007, World Bank (http://econ.worldbank.org/files/24989_wps3007.pdf). 
Robert Burchell, et al. (1998), Costs of Sprawl – Revisited, TCRP Report 39, Transportation 
Research Board (www.trb.org). 
Michael Burt and Greg Hoover (2006), Build It and Will They Drive? Modelling Light-Duty 
Vehicle Travel Demand, Conference Board of Canada (www.conferenceboard.ca); at 
www.conferenceboard.ca/e-library/abstract.aspx?did=1847.  
Edward G. Brown (2008), Comments on the Notice of Preparation for Draft Environmental 
Impact Report For the Transportation 2035 Plan, California Attorney General (http://ag.ca.gov); 
at http://ag.ca.gov/globalwarming/pdf/comments_MTC_RT_Plan.pdf.   
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested