Supplying 
F
iles to a
C
omme
r
cial P
r
inte
r
Tony 
J
ohnson
Convert pdf to jpg for - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
best program to convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf file into jpg
Convert pdf to jpg for - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf photo to jpg; conversion pdf to jpg
Supplying 
F
iles to a 
C
omme
r
cial P
r
inte
r
1
C
ontents
C
hapte
r
1
A B
r
ief 
H
isto
r
L
esson
.........................................5
C
hapte
r
2
C
hoosing Softwa
r
e
Microsoft applications.............................................. 7
Document integrity ................................................ 8
F
ont substitution .................................................. 8
Colours in Word ................................................... 8
T
he Pantone Matching System  ....................................... 9
Dedicated desktop publishing software  ............................... 9
What if 
I
have no other option but to use Word? ......................... 9
Page layout ......................................................10
Drawing......................................................... 11
Photo manipulation ...............................................12
T
he Creative Suite  ................................................12
C
hapte
r
3
Bleed
What is bleed? ? ...................................................13
Points to remember when working with bleed .........................14
Other times to use bleed ...........................................16
C
hapte
r
4
Cr
eep
What is creep?.................................................... . 17
What are the issues caused by creep? ................................ . 17
Can creep be compensated for by the printer? .........................18
T
he negative side of the creep process ...............................18
C
hapte
r
5
C
utting and 
Cr
easing Guides
Cutting and creasing guides s ........................................ 21
C
hapte
r
6
Document 
C
onst
r
uction
D
L
roll-folded brochures............................................ 23
Concertina brochures ............................................. 27
F
olders ......................................................... 28
When is a cover not a cover?  ....................................... 29
L
aying out a self cover publication ................................... 29
C
hapte
r
7
Wo
r
king with 
C
olou
r
Colour models.................................................... 31
RGB............................................................ 31
CM
YK
.......................................................... 32
Grayscale ....................................................... 33
Bitmap.......................................................... 33
Duotones ....................................................... 33
Spot colours v CM
YK
.............................................. 34
CM
YK
printing ................................................... 34
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert online pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF files to JPG.
best program to convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg file
Spot-colour printing............................................... 36
A
combination of both ............................................. 36
Overprints and knockouts .......................................... 37
Rich blacks ...................................................... 38
How and when to use rich blacks.................................... 38
Making and applying rich blacks .................................... 40
T
he problems with printing black solids .............................. 42
Working with colour libraries ....................................... 43
Pantone solid coated and uncoated.................................. 43
Metallics and pastel libraries ....................................... 43
Making the most of two colours ..................................... 44
Mixed ink swatches ............................................... 44
C
hapte
r
8
F
ile 
F
o
r
mats
TIFF
T
agged 
I
mage 
F
ile 
F
ormat...................................... 45
PSD - Photoshop Document ........................................ 45
J
PEG - 
J
oint Photographic Experts Group .............................. 46
Í
0)#4ÍANDÍ')&&ÍjLESÍ................................................ 46
V
ector based graphics............................................. 46
C
hapte
r
9
T
he Digital 
C
ame
r
a and Managing Resolution
Y
our digital camera................................................ 47
What is resolution and how is it measured? ........................... 48
What is the correct resolution to use? ................................ 48
Managing the resolution of images from a digital camera................. 49
A
djusting resolution to 300ppi...................................... 50
A
djusting the physical size of an image............................... 52
Deleting unwanted image area - a master stroke ....................... 53
Scanning hard copy originals ....................................... 55
Scanning black and white line work .................................. 55
C
hapte
r
10
PD
F
- Po
r
table Document 
F
o
r
mat
Making a PD
F
from Microsoft Word................................... 57
Making a PD
F
from 
I
nDesign ........................................ 58
Exporting to PD
F
using a supplied PD
F
preset .......................... 59
Exporting to PD
F
using custom settings ............................... 60
$IBQUFS
"OEkOBMMZ
Paragraphs...................................................... 61
Orphans and widows .............................................. 62
Rivers........................................................... 63
K
erning ......................................................... 63
T
he use of capitals ................................................ 64
Binding techniques ............................................... 64
Glue 
T
raps ...................................................... 67
I
nDesign preferences .............................................. 69
2
Supplying 
F
iles to a 
C
omme
r
cial P
r
inte
r
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
change file from pdf to jpg; convert multiple page pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
convert pdf to jpeg on; change pdf to jpg format
Supplying 
F
iles to a 
C
omme
r
cial P
r
inte
r
3
Introduction
O ver the last twenty years or so the printing and graphic arts 
industry has witnessed many changes, none more so than the 
introduction of the computer into our everyday lives.
Without question, modern day technology has advanced 
commercial printing to a point where many of the traditional skills 
once used (particularly in design and pre-press) are sadly no longer 
with us.
Certainly, it would be foolish for me to suggest that without 
those skills around today the printing trade would have gone into 
steep decline; that was never going to happen. But even with all 
the technical resources and wondrous software available today 
there still lies a lack of education on the subject of preparing files 
correctly to meet the demands of the commercial printing process.
Hopefully, over the next few pages you will become familiar 
with some of the issues which dog pre-press departments the world 
over and hopefully learn some of the techniques which will make 
your file preparation as trouble free as possible.
TJ
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
pdf to jpeg converter; changing pdf to jpg on
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
best way to convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf document to jpg
4
Supplying 
F
iles to a 
C
omme
r
cial P
r
inte
r
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
best pdf to jpg converter online; change pdf to jpg online
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. Copyright © <2000-2015> by <RasterEdge.com>. All Rights Reserved.
convert pdf file to jpg on; batch convert pdf to jpg online
CH
AP
TE
R
1
A Brief History Lesson
When I first started my apprenticeship way back in the 
late 70’s as a finished artist/film planner, the process 
of producing a printed product was a fairly labour intensive 
procedure.
The client may have enlisted the services of a graphic designer 
to come up with concepts and designs, a copywriter to write text 
and maybe a professional photographer was hired to capture 
images.
Once all these elements were in place, up steps the finished 
artist and photo typesetters to convert the visual designs, copy and 
photography into camera ready artwork. At this point a camera 
operator would turn the artwork into negatives and a scanner 
operator would produce film separations from the photographs. 
The negatives and scans were meticulously combined using 
complex masking techniques ending up with final film which 
would eventually be used to produce the printing plates.
Not only was the pre-press industry more labour intensive then, 
but each and every stage of the process was handled by a skilled 
tradesperson with years of experience in their field. So by the time 
the presses started rolling all was well. Usually!
Skip forward a few years and you will now find that just about 
all those skills I mentioned have been put into the laps of a couple 
of people and a computer or two. Certainly, the graphic designer 
wears a multitude of hats to provide finished electronic files to 
the printer for output. In some cases, the graphic designer will be 
the copywriter, the photographer, the typesetter, the finished artist 
or even the scanner operator. I have even come across instances 
Supplying 
F
iles to a 
C
omme
r
cial P
r
inte
r
5
6
Supplying 
F
iles to a 
C
omme
r
cial P
r
inte
r
where all these skills have been performed (to the best of their 
ability) by the office secretary and a copy of Microsoft Word.
It soon became evident that even with the introduction of new 
computer technologies a massive hole was beginning to develop. A 
lack of knowledge and skills meant that electronic files were being 
sent to the printer either unsuitable to use or riddled with technical 
issues.
Clients would get frustrated when printers charged extra to 
correct their files or they simply refused to handle their work in 
its current format. This ultimately lead to the software developers 
making their products more intuitive to the demands of the 
printing process and to even develop software to find and fix some 
of the issues with bad files.
All said and done, even today I still come in contact with 
problematic electronic artwork which fails the commercial printing 
process due to the lack of some very basic requirements.
Certainly, better education in file construction and a more 
comprehensive understanding of the printing process would go a 
long way to address these issues. Hopefully, this publication will 
help those of you new to desktop publishing and even seasoned 
graphic designers to achieve trouble free results.
I think it’s important to remember that when an electronic file 
is created, its creator is ultimately responsible for its accuracy and 
integrity, not anyone else.
CH
AP
TE
R
2
Choosing Software
Iwould like you to try something for me. Walk over to a white 
board and sign your name using a white board marker. The results 
should be pretty good. Now try to sign your name using a pencil, 
obviously the result is not as good. Why not? After all, a pencil is a 
perfectly good writing instrument, it’s been around for centuries.
The problem is, the pencil, in this instance, is not the right tool 
for the job. The same applies to the software you choose to create 
your desktop publishing files.
When you start producing electronic documents which 
are intended to be printed at a commercial printers you need 
to seriously consider how these files are produced and more 
importantly which software is best used to produce them.
Mic
r
osoft Applications
First of all, I would like to make one thing perfectly crystal clear, 
Microsoft applications are excellent products and used within an 
office environment will give 100% accurate results with minimal 
effort or training. In fact, just about all the text for this publication 
was initially set using Microsoft Word.
Unfortunately, applications such as Microsoft Word, Excel and 
PowerPoint, are totally inappropriate for use in the commercial 
printing process, especially when your documents contain colour, 
images or complex graphics.
Those of you who regularly use Word may ask “What is so 
wrong with Word that printers dislike it so much”? (And they do.)
Well, there are a number of reasons, one is document integrity 
and the other; how Word creates and uses colour. Let me explain.
Supplying 
F
iles to a 
C
omme
r
cial P
r
inte
r
7
8
Supplying 
F
iles to a 
C
omme
r
cial P
r
inte
r
Document integrity
When I talk of document integrity I am referring to how a Word 
document looks on the creator’s screen and to how it opens on 
a computer used at your printers. You may think that a Word 
document will open the same on any other computer, in fact this is 
a very bad assumption to make.
The problem is Word documents don’t travel well. Open a Word 
document on any other computer other than the one it was created 
on and you run the risk of text reflow and font substitution.
Microsoft Word, Excel, Powerpoint and even Publisher construct 
their documents using a certain amount of information gleaned 
from the network printer it is connected to. So, if you then open 
up the document on a third party computer, the document is 
reconstructed using slightly different information. This can cause 
margins to change or graphics to move without warning, causing 
unexpected results.
F
ont substitution
Imagine you have created a Word document using the following 
fonts; Garamond Roman, Gill Sans and Times. Give that document 
to your printer to open and they would naturally need to have 
those fonts resident on their computer to display the document 
faithfully. What if they don’t?
Unfortunately, unlike dedicated desktop publishing software, 
Word offers no warning that this is about to happen, a substitute 
font is simply used. The resulting document will not only use the 
incorrect font, but the text will reflow to the point where the page 
count could be different.
Colours in Word
Microsoft Word displays colour within its documents using a 
colour system known as RGB (I cover this in much more detail on 
page 31). All you really need to understand is unfortunately, this 
system of handling colour is completely alien to the commercial 
printing process. And although RGB colours can some of the 
time be converted to a more print friendly format this can be 
problematic and time consuming ending up with unforeseen costs.
Supplying 
F
iles to a 
C
omme
r
cial P
r
inte
r
9
The Pantone Matching System
Have you ever visited the local hardware store to purchase paint? 
If you have, you probably used one of those sample swatch books 
to choose the colours you liked. Well, you may be surprised to 
learn that printers use a similar method to choose ink colour; its 
called the Pantone Matching System (PMS) and is a worldwide 
standard of selecting and using colour in the printing and 
publishing industry.
With this in mind it may now come as no surprise to learn that 
Microsoft Word does not support PMS colours or any of the other 
standard libraries of colour selection offered by dedicated desktop 
publishing software.
What if 
I
have no other option but to use Microsoft Word?
If you are one of the many people who rely on Word to produce 
your documentation, then there is a solution to solve some of these 
issues, it’s PDF or Portable Document Format. I have dedicated a 
chapter to this (see page 57).
Dedicated Desktop Publishing Softwa
r
e
The last thing I wish to get into here is a debate over which 
software is better than another. The recommendations I offer here 
are my own personal ones based on my own experiences during 
my career.
First of all, if you are already using dedicated desktop 
publishing software all well and good, if you have recently moved 
from Word for example, you should be commended on your 
excellent decision. If you are considering switching may I offer 
the following advice. Book yourself on one of the many training 
courses available, be patient and above all enjoy the experience, it 
can be very rewarding.
What you need
There is certainly a myriad of software available today associated 
with graphic arts and publishing, but they all fall generally into 
one or more of three categories; Page Layout, Drawing and Photo 
Manipulation.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested