how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc using c# : Change pdf to jpg file control SDK platform web page winforms html web browser GSP-RPT-SPS-0503%20LBST%20Final%20Report%20Space%20Earth%20Solar%20Comparison%20Study%20050318%20s11-part1963

E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Space system architectures
Final Report
3-99
The reference study [Anon 1979] set the rectenna's minor semi-axis at 5 km, for 5 GW of
power delivered: this is equivalent to a basic average extracted power density of
63.66 W/m² – further decreasing with latitude. The rectenna site proper was extended by
a 0.7-km wide exclusion area, to let the power density drop further down to less than
1 W/m². As reported, e.g. [Redding 1977] or [Brown 1979], the power density over the
rectenna's aperture varied from a peak of 230 W/m² down to 10 W/m² at the rim, this last
value corresponding to one-tenth of the US continuous-exposure standard; the more
stringent standard in the Former Soviet Union – 0.1 W/m² (see discussion in chapter
10.2.2c) – is reached 3 km from the aperture's edge.
An issue investigated in the period of the CDEP concerned the potential for nonlinear
heating of the ionospheric medium by the microwave beam: the critical point was
predicted to be in the range of 150-300 W/m², raising the possibility that the SPS beam
could cause thermal runaway [Brown 1979]. [Mankins 1999] report as „probable only
limit“ the RF breakdown voltage levels in the beams at stratospheric altitudes, i.e.:
– 50 kW/m², 1 GHz, 55 km
– 8,000 kW/m², 10 GHz, 38 km
Element
Efficiency Power
Heat
S/c DC-EM conversion efficiency
0.90
2.67
0.27
EMC & diplexing filters
0.794
2.40
0.50
Subarray aperture efficiency
0.95
1.90
0.09
Subarray failures
0.96
1.81
0.07
Amplitude errors, taper quantization
0.986
1.74
0.03
Phase errors
0.97
1.71
0.05
Beam steering scan loss
0.977
1.66
0.04
Beam coupling (avg) efficiency
0.918
1.62
0.13
Propagation impairements
0.933
1.49
0.10
Polarization mismatch
0.999
1.39
0.00
Rectenna aperture scan loss
0.999
1.39
0.00
Rectenna elements failures
0.99
1.39
0.02
Rectenna aperture efficiency
0.95
1.37
0.06
EMC filtering
0.891
1.31
0.15
Ground EM-DC conversion efficiency
0.86
1.16
0.16
Required power output to grid
1.00
Table 3-2: Power transmission efficiency [Marzwell 2000]
An rough average value estimate basing on the power distribution data from [Redding
1977] yields 97 W/m². With the assumed values for the efficiency of the energy collection,
the rf-dc power conversion, and for the grid interface (86%, 87%, 99%, i.e. 74% total; or
Change pdf to jpg file - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert multiple page pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg image
Change pdf to jpg file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert .pdf to .jpg online; changing pdf to jpg on
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Space system architectures
3-100
as revised: 88%, 90%, 99%, 78.4% total) the corresponding output value works out at
71.8 (or 76.0) W/m², or 13-19% higher than indicated by the global approximation.
Current efficiency estimates seem to come down to 72% (using the data from [Marzwell
2000]. If we take the average power density over the rectenna at 97 W/m², the average
output would then amount to almost 70 W/m². However, the 5-GW Solar Disk is
associated with a 19.63 km² rectenna, leading to an average power extracted of
254.7 W/m², which would correspond to average power density above the rectenna of
353.8 W/m², or 3.6 times higher than in the CDEP scenario.
This level seems too optimistic, when set against the above-mentioned standards.
However, to reflect the advantage of operating at a higher frequency, the average power
in the beam above the rectenna was arbitrarily set at 200 W/m²; at the same time, the
width of the exclusion area was increased to 1 km. Actual power density distributions –
above and beyond the actual collecting area – will depend on the illumination functions
over the transmit antenna aperture, and one can very reasonable expect that a large
freedom exists to adapt those patterns to minimize exposure values on ground.
Power transmission between satellite and ground based rectennae via microwave is
physical best described as a diffraction on a circular aperture [Sizmann 1978]. A principle
distribution of microwave intensity is depicted in Figure 3-9.
Figure 3-9: The principle intensity distribution of microwave irradiation is
considered as a diffraction on a circular aperture [Stöcker 1994]
Figure 3-9 shows that side-lobes may have to be taken into account when designing a
space based solar power system and rectennae respectively.
3.3 
Flexible operation of solar power satellites and rectennae
A space-based power supply system comprising one satellite and one rectenna supplying
continuous power is the simplest case to analyze economically, and it has received most
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the PDF files with the
change from pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg file
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
.pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg image
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Space system architectures
Final Report
3-101
attention in the “Fresh Look” study [NASA 1997], the US Department of Energy’s 1970s
“Reference System” study [DOE 1980], and elsewhere. However, in reality, rectennae and
solar power satellites would be separate facilities which could be operated in a number of
more flexible ways than simply supplying base load power. These possibilities would
increase as the total number of satellites and rectennae in operation increased.
The Fresh Look study refers to the concept of a “Planetary Power Web”, which is
described as “...a space solar power concept which assumes a mature network of space
solar power assets... and ground-based receivers. …A key use of the Power Web concept
would be for providing peak power or load leveling on an intercontinental basis. This
could be accomplished using solar power generated by the Power Web system elements
or by the relay of power generated by other sources...” [NASA 1997, pp 49-50].
A similar idea, the desirability of flexible operation of a space-based solar power system,
was discussed during the US DOE study [DOE 1980]. For example, Europeans Shelton and
Franklin noted that continuous supply represented only about 20% of electricity output in
Britain, and stated: “SPS acceptability would be greatly enhanced if it were more flexible,
and possessed some measure of capability for load-following” [Shelton 1980].
Electricity supply companies, which will determine the conditions under which space-
based solar power might be used, have a similar view. Donalek and Whysong state the
economic advantages of operating space-based systems with a high load factor, but they
point to the physical difficulty of utilities operating nuclear and coal plants on non-base
load schedules (in order to accommodate solar power satellites) since they suffer physical
damage from repeated thermal cycling [Donalek 1978]. Kubitz and Moss suggest that
progress towards using space-based power would involve a cautious, step-by-step
process, starting with purchases of power, then involving installing equipment to connect
a rectenna to the grid, thirdly building a rectenna, and only fourthly possibly investing in a
satellite itself [Kubitz 1980].
EU electricity demand in 2030 is discussed in Section 4.3.4. The winter maximum is
forecast in Figure 4-5 as 570 GW, and the summer minimum is forecast Figure 4-6 as 255
GW. Consequently demand for continuous electric power would be some 45% of the
maximum. In this case, 500 GW of space-based solar power would be nearly twice the
demand for continuous power in Europe.
One possible strategy would be to export power to countries outside Europe, as discussed
in Section 8.3.3 below. Alternatively, excess supply capacity could be used to charge
storage systems to reduce the peak capacity needed; however this would incur additional
cost and losses, and so would be feasible only if the system was economic at significantly
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
best way to convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf to gif or jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc. PowerPoint.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
batch pdf to jpg online; convert pdf to high quality jpg
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Space system architectures
3-102
less than 97% load-factor, as discussed in Section 8.2.4. A third alternative is to use
space-based solar power supply systems for flexible supply of non-base load power.
As discussed in Section 8.3.3b), a European space-based solar power system of 500 GW
capacity would be likely to be accompanied by similar capacity in both Asia and America.
Such a system would be sufficiently large and mature to operate as a “planetary power
web” in which the system’s potential operational flexibility would be exploited to supply
higher-priced non-base load power in addition to continuous power supply. In order to
assess the feasibility and potential of such a system, it is necessary to analyze the
conditions under which non-continuous operation could be economic; a method of
performing this analysis is demonstrated next, taken from [Collins 1991].
3.3.1 De-coupled satellite and rectenna operation
From the technical point of view, delivery of microwave power from space to Earth would
be uniquely flexible; the direction of a multi-GW microwave beam could be switched
rapidly, thereby moving its "footprint" on the Earth by thousands of kilometers. Kaupang
describes ways in which power delivery to a rectenna could be controllably reduced to
zero in less than 1 second [Kaupang 1980]. For electricity supply, ramping power output
up and down over a period of minutes or even longer would generally be preferred by
electricity grid managers. Consequently a space-based solar power station could deliver
power in rotation to two or more different rectennae in response to utilities’ changing
demand.
An important constraint on this flexibility is the economic need to keep the load-factors of
both rectennae and satellites high enough to be profitable. However, in the Fresh Look
study [NASA 1997], the cost of the rectenna is estimated as being only some 7.5% of the
total system cost. Because of this, rectennae would be much less tightly constrained to
achieve high operating load-factors than satellites. That is, although it would not be
profitable to operate an orbiting solar power plant with a load-factor much less than the
maximum possible, this would not necessarily be true of rectennae. Moreover, satellite
operators would have more interest in revenue maximization than in load-factor
maximization per se, and electricity prices are not constant. The unique capability of
space-based systems to transmit power to rectennae over a wide range of latitude and
longitude would enable them to deliver power to more than one rectenna at lower load-
factors of the rectennae than of the satellites.
Calculation of the cost of non-base load power supplied by a space-based system
therefore requires the rectenna and satellite to be treated as separate facilities. In this
case, their respective contributions to the total cost of power would depend primarily on
C# TIFF: How to Use C#.NET Code to Compress TIFF Image File
C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object. List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); / Step1: Load image to REImage object. foreach (string file in
pdf to jpeg; convert multiple pdf to jpg
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with PDFDocument(images.ToArray()); / Save document to a file.
change pdf file to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Space system architectures
Final Report
3-103
their respective load-factors, since most of their costs would be fixed costs. Analyzing
their costs separately in this way enables the feasibility of various operating schedules to
be understood. NB for these calculations the cost of the satellite must include all costs,
including transportation, construction, maintenance etc, and the rectenna cost must
include the cost of linking to the electricity distribution grid, cost of being designed to
accept power-beams from several satellites (as appropriate), etc.
To clarify this, it is assumed that rectennae would be operated by electricity supply
companies as one of their facilities, while satellites would be operated by separate
microwave power supply companies, as Kassing also discussed [Kassing 2000]. Electricity
supply managers operating a rectenna would buy microwave power from the satellite
offering the lowest price (assuming satisfaction of agreed microwave-beam
specifications), while satellite operators would deliver microwave power to the rectenna
operator offering the highest price. As a result, satellites might supply power to different
rectennae following a variety of schedules different from constant base load supply. This
relationship between rectenna and satellite operators can be expressed simply by the
following equation (in units of cost per unit of electrical energy, such as EUR/kWh
e
):
Cost of space-generated electricity y = Cost of rectenna + Price of microwave power
C
sp
  C
r
  P
mw
Equation 3-1: Cost of space generated electricity
where C
sp
is the cost on Earth of electricity generated using a space-based system; C
r
is
the cost contribution of the rectenna and related equipment; and P
mw
is the price paid for
supplies of microwave energy. For some calculations it can be useful to break the cost of
the rectenna down further into capital cost and operating cost, to include an efficiency
factor into the microwave power price, and other details; none of these are considered in
the present analysis.
Importantly, by equating C
sp
to the current wholesale price of electricity, and knowing the
rectenna cost (calculated from its capital cost and operating load-factor) the maximum
price which could be paid for microwave power delivered to the rectenna at any particular
load-factor can be calculated. In addition, by knowing the satellite’s capital and operating
costs it is then possible to calculate the lowest load-factor at which a satellite could
operate while supplying this power.
To illustrate the use of Equation 3-1 we first use the calculation from the Fresh Look study
that the capital cost of the satellite is 92.5% of the total system cost, and the rectenna
7.5%. Making the further assumption that the combined system is competitive with other
base load power suppliers if operated at a load factor of 90%, and considering all costs as
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in GetPage(0) ' Convert the first PDF page to a BMP file. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET
convert pdf into jpg; batch convert pdf to jpg online
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
bulk pdf to jpg converter online; changing pdf file to jpg
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Space system architectures
3-104
fixed costs, we can calculate the range of operating conditions (in terms of load factors on
rectenna and satellite) under which the output would have the same cost. The result is
shown in Figure 3-10: the rectenna could be economically operated with a load factor as
low as 60% if the load factor of the satellite from which it was receiving microwave
power was 94%.
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
Infeasible operating zone
Feasible operating zone
Satellite load factor
Rectenna load factor
0.2         0.3         0.4         0.5         0.6         0.7         0.8         0.9
Figure 3-10: Feasible operating conditions of decoupled satellite and rectenna (1)
Wholesale electricity prices differ significantly between countries, regions and over a
range of time-scales. Consequently, a system that might be competitive as base load
supply only at 95% load factor in one system, could be competitive in another at a lower
load factor. Figure 3-11 illustrates the range of feasible operating conditions in the case in
which the combined system was competitive with base load power at a load factor of
85%. In this case, the rectenna could be economically operated with a load factor as low
as some 40%, if supplied with microwave power from a satellite operating at 94% load
factor.
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Space system architectures
Final Report
3-105
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Infeasible operating zone
Feasible operating zone
Satellite load factor
Rectenna load factor (x10)
Figure 3-11: Feasible operating conditions of decoupled satellite and rectenna (2)
The above examples understate the system’s flexibility because the wholesale price of
non-base load power is higher than base load. The extent to which this operational
flexibility of space-based solar power supply systems would be used in practice would
depend on the difference in the market price of base load power and non-base load
power, among other factors. This price difference varies between countries, and under
different operating conditions, such as seasonally, whereby the average level of daily
electricity output changes over a period of several months. The potential benefits of
operating in this way can be estimated by using relevant price data. As a simple example
we assume that the price of non-base load power is 33% higher than that of base load
power. In this case the range of feasible operating conditions is considerably wider than
in the previous cases, as shown in Figure 3-12 for the case in which the joint
satellite/rectenna was competitive only at 95% joint load-factor.
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Space system architectures
3-106
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Infeasible operating zone
Feasible operating zone
Satellite load factor
Rectenna load factor (x10)
Figure 3-12: Feasible operating conditions of decoupled satellite and rectenna (3)
Clearly, a rectenna that could be operated economically at a load factor of 20% while
receiving power from a satellite operated at a load factor of 90% would be a very flexible
facility.
These and other potential benefits of operating rectennae and satellites in a "decoupled"
way are not discussed or analyzed in the Fresh Look study nor in the 1970s SPS Reference
System study. However, as shown above, the additional economic value of being able to
operate rectennae at lower load factors suggests that this mode of operation would be
used increasingly as the number of rectennae and satellites increased. This is because, as
the number of alternative supply sources for each rectenna, and the number of alternative
customers for each satellite increased, the overall system's flexibility would improve. This
mode of operation might even become the main way of operating solar power satellites
and rectennae, linked through a wholesale market for microwave power from space
(discussed further in Section 8.3.3b) below).
a) European rectenna conditions
In the Fresh Look study report, the rectenna cost for the 1970s Reference System is
quoted as being 21% of the total system cost, while that in the Fresh Look study is some
7.5%; this difference is mainly due to the different frequency assumed for microwave
power transmission: at 5.8 GHz the area of a 5 GW rectenna is estimated at some 20
sqkm, compared to 85 km² for the 1970s Reference System [NASA 1997, table 6-4, p
118]. This difference has a major impact on the cost of a rectenna, and hence on its
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Space system architectures
Final Report
3-107
operation. Consequently the selection of 2.45 GHz, 5.8 GHz or other microwave frequency
is a decision of great significance for the system’s economic evaluation.
In Table 5-6 the area of a rectenna for European use is stated as 50.44 km². Using this
with the Fresh Look study’s cost of $45.3/m² (48 EUR
2000
) for the rectenna [NASA 1997,
table 6-4, p 118] gives a rectenna cost of $3,035 (3,217 EUR
2000
) which is 13.3% of the
adjusted total system cost of $22,845 (24,216 EUR
2000
). Using this figure of 13.3% as the
basis for the same calculations as performed above, Figure 3-13 to Figure 3-15 illustrate
the potential for flexible operation of a European rectenna; although scope for flexible
operation is reduced due to the higher cost, it would still be substantial.
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Infeasible operating zone
Feasible operating zone
Satellite load factor
Rectenna load factor (x10)
Figure 3-13: Feasible operating conditions of satellite and European rectenna (1)
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Space system architectures
3-108
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Infeasible operating zone
Feasible operating zone
Satellite load factor
Rectenna load factor (x10)
Figure 3-14: Feasible operating conditions of satellite and European rectenna (2)
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Infeasible operating zone
Feasible operating zone
Satellite load factor
Rectenna load factor (x10)
Figure 3-15: Feasible operating conditions of satellite and European rectenna (3)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested