E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
System combination (WP3)
Final Report
8-259
Figure 8-18 illustrates the various pathways of a hydrogen economy. Most of the
technologies depicted in Figure 8-18 are complementing technologies. This gives
numerous degrees of freedom for an optimal system design regarding the target
application and the locally predominating resource basis.
Hydrogen
Industry
Import
Elektrolysis
Reforming
Electricity Grid
Fossil
Nuclear
Coal, Oil,
Natural Gas
Biomass
Solar/SPS, Wind, Geothermal, Water
Ship
C
x
H
y
MOBILE
(Traction/APU)
Trailer
Pipeline
Refuelling
Station
Electricity
STATIONARY
(Residential/Industry)
PORTABLE
(Micro..Small)
ENERGY CONVERSION
(Fuel Cell, Gas Turbine, Internal Combustion)
H
B
F
Cartridge
Hydrogen
Figure 8-18: Technological pathways of a hydrogen/fuel cell economy (LBST)
During the last couple of years, the automotive and oil industry launched several studies
to analyze potential alternative fuels for transportation purposes. These studies came to
the conclusion that hydrogen based on renewable energies is the most promising solution
in the long-term, e.g. Transport Energy Strategy group (TES) [BMVBW 2001], the
California Fuel Cell Partnership [CaFCP 2003] and well-to-wheel analysis of General
Motors for the North American and Europen regions [LBST 2002].
As can be seen in Figure 8-19, hydrogen generated by electricity from renewable energy
sources such as wind power offers the highest green house gas (GHG) emission reduction
Change pdf to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file to jpg online; convert pdf file into jpg
Change pdf to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert multiple pdf to jpg online; change pdf to jpg online
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
System combination (WP3)
8-260
potential. Compared to crude oil based fuels i.e. diesel a reduction of GHG emissions up
to 100% is possible when compressed gaseous hydrogen (CGH
2
) is produced via on-site
electrolysis from wind power (or other renewable electricity sources). Other fuels like
Fischer Tropsch (FT) diesel derived from natural gas (NG) do not reduce the GHG emission.
Further natural gas fuels face analogue problem as oil products: constrains of fossil fuel
resources especially crude oil and natural gas and political dependency from suppliers
such as Russia. Furthermore, there will be an increasing natural gas demand from
emerging economies, such as China. Biomass based fuels such as ethanol are limited by
land availability and as a result are in competition with other agriculture use (food
production but also the production of renewable raw materials used for insulation
material, textiles etc.). Hydrogen can be made from biomass but also can be made from
renewable electricity. But the realistic biomass potential available for transport fuels is not
sufficient to generate all hydrogen required to meet the future hydrogen demand of the
transport sector.
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
Gasoline ICE MTA
Gasoline FPFC
Diesel DI-ICE MTA
LH2 EU-NG-Mix ICE MTA
LH2 EU-NG-Mix FC
CNG EU-NG-Mix ICE MTA
Methanol remote-NG FPFC
FT-Diesel remote-NG DI-ICE MTA
CGH2 EU-NG-Mix/onsite FC
CGH2 Residual Wood FC
CGH2 Wood Plantation FC
CMG Organic Waste ICE MTA
Ethanol Sugar Beet FPFC
FT-Diesel Residual Wood DI-ICE MTA
CGH2 EU-El-Mix onsite FC
CGH2 Wind onsite FC
GHG emissions [g/km]
Vehicle: Opel Zafira
Oil
Natural Gas
Biomass
Electricity
FC:      Fuel Cell
FPFC:  Fuel Processor Fuel Cell
ICE:     Internal Combustion Engine
166
GHG Reduction Potentials for
Non-Hybrid Drive Systems
Compared to DI Diesel
- 85%
- 2.5%
- 29.5%
~- 100%
[Reference]
MTA: Manual Transmission Automated
ICE: Internal Combustion Engine
DI-ICE: Direct Injection Internal Combustion Engine
FPFC: Fuel Processor Fuel Cell
FC: Fuel Cell 
Figure 8-19: Well-to-Wheel analysis of various conventional and renewable fuel
paths for automotive application [LBST 2002]
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert pdf page to jpg; .net convert pdf to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi; change pdf to jpg file
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
System combination (WP3)
Final Report
8-261
For 2030 the most promising option for alternative transportation fuel is hydrogen
produced from renewable energy sources such as solar and wind power.
Assuming that a space-based solar power system ('Solar Disk', GEO stationary position,
7,884 h/yr), would be exclusively operated for hydrogen production purposes, the
following number of medium sized cars (each 10,000 km/yr at 50 kWh
H2_LHV
/100km) could
be supplied depending on the different scenario size (Table 8-19). For a first estimation, it
is assumed that hydrogen production and consumption take place in closer vicinity to
each other so that transportation effort is negligible. It is further assumed that the driving
cycle tank-to-wheel efficiency is 40% of the fuel cell powered car. Furthermore, a pressure
electrolyzer with an average efficiency of 1.5 kWh
e
/kWh
H2_LHV
and an output pressure of
20 MPa is assumed. Two variants are examined: compression work to 70 MPa with an
energy effort of 0.07 kWh
e
/kWh
H2_LHV
and hydrogen liquefaction considering a
conventional liquefaction plant with 0.3 kWh
e
/kWh
LH2_LHV
(an advanced optimized
liquefaction process could require as low as 0.21 kWh
e
/kWh
LH2_LHV
energy effort in the
future).
Scenario size
[GW]
No. of cars
(CGH
2
)
No. of cars
(LH
2
)
0.5
502,166
438,000
5
5,021,656
4,380,000
10
10,043,312
8,760,000
50
50,216,561
43,800,000
100
100,433,121
87,600,000
150
150,649,682
131,400,000
500
502,165,605
438,000,000
Table 8-19: Numbers of mid-sized cars supplied by an SPS system at various
scenario sizes
As a rule of thumb, it can be said that per each GW of installed SPS capacity one million
fuel cell powered cars can be supplied on a compressed gas hydrogen basis.
c) 
Current activities
Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies are high on the European political agenda since
October 1992 at the latest. Romano Prodi (president of the European Commission),
Phillipe Busquin (EU Commissioner for research) as well as Loyola de Palacio (EU
Commissioner for energy and transportation) repeatedly gave a favorable opinion for
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
batch convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg converter
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputDirectory = @"C:\output\"; // Convert tiff to jpg and show How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C#
batch pdf to jpg converter online; best pdf to jpg converter online
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
System combination (WP3)
8-262
hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. By then, no dedicated EU programme for hydrogen
and fuel cell research existed in the sixth framework programme of the European Union.
At that time the USA already pursued their "Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure
Technologies Program" (www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/fuels/). Japan skipped their
long-bevor WE-NET program for the sake of the "Millennium Project" as well as the
"Japan Hydrogen Fuel Cell Demonstration Project (JHFC)".
Mid of June 2003, European commission president Romano Prodi and the US energy
minister Spencer Abraham signed an agreement for a joint EU US research in the field of
fuel cell technology. Seven focus points were identified therein:
– Field trials in the transportation sector (including transportation infrastructure)
– Fuel cells for auxiliary power units (APU) to be placed in conventional cars
– Standards for fuel infrastructure, vehicles and APUs
– System analyses for fuel supply as well as analyses of material resources for low
temperature fuel cells
– Studies in the field including the resource situation of rare earth metals for high-
temperature fuel cells
– Direct-methanol (DMFC) and proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) for
mobile and stationary applications
– Solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) as well as hybrid systems comprising high-temperature
fuel cells and turbines
Already in the beginning of 2003, the US initiated a world-wide research initiative entitled
"International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy (IPHE)". This initiative followed
shortly after US president George W. Bush's State of the Union speech in which he
assigned hydrogen a key role for the future energy supply. Meanwhile, all major countries
in the field of fuel cell research and development joined the IPHE (Australia, Brazili,
Canada, China, France, Germany, Iceland, India, Italy, Japan, Norway, Republic of Korea,
Russia, UK, USA and the European Union).
For the following 5 years, the USA will support hydrogen and fuel cell technology
development with 1.7 billion US$ in the framework of the FreedomCar programme and
the president's initiative.
Mid November 2003, the European Commission presented its action plan to the public.
2.8 billion EUR shall be spent exclusively for hydrogen research, development and
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
c# convert pdf to jpg; change pdf file to jpg file
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
convert pdf photo to jpg; convert pdf document to jpg
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
System combination (WP3)
Final Report
8-263
demonstration up to the year 2015 in the framework of the Hypogen and Hycom
programme.
The car as well as the oil industry have partly strongly committed to hydrogen. General
Motors, Daimler Chrysler and Toyota each invested in the order of magnitude of
1 billion EUR in research, development and demonstration so far. Shell founded Shell
hydrogen in 1999. BP/ARAL, TOTAL, ChevronTexaco, Exxon Mobil and others are active in
infrastructure developments.
Some 110 different prototypes of fuel cell powered vehicles and some 36 different
hydrogen vehicles with internal combustion engine (ICE) have been developed since 1967.
Of most of these prototypes several exemplars were manufactured. Thus, all in all, some
230 fuel cell and 66 ICE powered vehicles were built as per beginning of the year 2003.
Thereof, the absolute majority was produced after 1995.
Figure 8-20: Hydrogen powered fuel cell vehicle based on the 'Zafira' platform by
General Motors (Opel); the HydroGen3 was built in two versions: with a liquid
and a gaseous hydrogen storage tank placed underneath the backseat
The remaining critical parameter for a broad introduction of fuel cell vehicles are the
production costs of fuel cells (currently some 1,000 EUR/kW
e
). According to the US
Department of Energy (DoE) the manufacturing costs of fuel cells can be lowered down to
100 $/kW
e
on the basis of today's state-of-technology. Target costs of 30 $/kW
e
by the
year 2015 are stated in the framework of the US FreedomCar programme.
DaimlerChrysler, Honda and General Motors/Opel indicate that target costs as low as
50 $/kW
e
for the fuel cell including the electric motor are already achievable on the basis
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
batch pdf to jpg converter; change from pdf to jpg
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf file to jpg; pdf to jpeg
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
System combination (WP3)
8-264
of annual production volumes of 100,000 to 1 million vehicles. Major car companies thus
are certain to meet the cost targets required for market penetration.
Meanwhile, various introduction scenarios for hydrogen powered vehicles are discussed
world-wide. Some growth projections argue that even in twenty to thirty years fuel cell
vehicles will only captures a marginal share of the overall market. Given the number of
uncertainties which accompany the introduction of hydrogen powered vehicles, any
prognosis can only be vague. An introduction in 'slow motion' is yet very unlikely for one
simple reason: Either hydrogen powered vehicles will overcome technical and economic
hurdles to be competitive with conventional technology, then the market penetration will
proceed rapidly (why should someone not buy the car with the better overall
performance). Or hydrogen powered vehicles will not overcome these hurdles and then
would finally fail to enter the market at all (why should someone buy the car with the
worse performance).
There is a growing number of hydrogen filling-stations both for conventional vehicles
which have been converted to use hydrogen as fuel, and for fuel cell-powered vehicles
which are now being used on a trial basis in several countries including Japan, Germany
(Berlin, Hamburg, Stuttgart) and USA (California, Florida, Washington et al). Some 100
hydrogen refueling stations will be operating world-wide by the end of 2004. Most of
them supplying only a couple of hydrogen powered cars or buses per day.
Broad-scale introduction concepts are pursued by Japan and Iceland. In several US states
as well as Canada and China, seed demonstration projects are discussed to initiate the
built-up of hydrogen infrastructure, mostly along defined corridors (sometimes also
subsumed as "hydrogen highways"). The Japanese project is supported by Toyota, Honda
and other major corporations to realise a pure “hydrogen economy” on the island of
Yakushima. The same applies to Iceland which has abundant renewable energy resources
from geothermal sources. The Iceland government announced to subsequently substitute
hydrogen for all fossil fuel used nationally. Therefore, a hydrogen refueling station was
opened in 2003 in Iceland's capital Reikjavík. Three DaimlerChrysler hydrogen powered
fuel cell buses are in regular public transport service (www.ectos.is).
Commercial sales have started of hydrogen-fuelled domestic electricity generation
systems, such as the combined heat-and-power systems now being marketed by the
Honda Corporation in Japan. Yet, further progress is required in order to penetrate the
stationary energy market on a large-scale.
International standards for hydrogen fuel purity, and equipment such as hydrogen fuel
tanks for motor vehicles are being pushed forward as a result of negotiations between
major Japanese, German and American motor manufacturers, oil companies such as the
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
System combination (WP3)
Final Report
8-265
Royal Dutch/Shell Group, and others (e.g. EIHP – European Integrated Hydrogen Project,
www.eihp.org).
Concerning the public acceptance and social implication of hydrogen and fuel cell
technologies, eight studies have been carried out so far most of them in Germany. Three
have been conducted in the course of a demonstration project. A first international
acceptance study has started in 2003 and will be pursued until mid 2005 [LBST 2004].
Locations included are London (UK), Berlin (Germany), Luxembourg (Luxembourg), Perth
(Australia) and Oakland (California, USA). Passengers of hydrogen buses (fuel cells and
ICEs) in demonstration projects will be surveyed. By now, two central conclusions may be
drawn from the existing studies: Hydrogen acceptance is generally high, and as soon as
people experience hydrogen technology in their every-day life they accept and use it.
8.3.3 Further SPS synergies
In this chapter, potential synergies of space-based solar power systems are described
which go beyond the scope of this study and its scenarios respectively. The propositions
have to be seen in conjunction with space/terrestrial synergies (chapter 8) and
technological descriptions in chapter 3.4.
a) 
Europe power-sharing
Although the major focus of this report is power supply to Europe, the inherently
international scope of delivery from satellites in geo-stationary orbit would create
potential market opportunities through sharing the output of a European satellite with
rectennae outside Europe. Even while focusing on power supply for Europe, it would be a
mistake to exclude any consideration of exports and imports from a study of such an
inherently global system. That is, drawing conclusions about the system’s feasibility while
ignoring international exchanges of power would lead to false conclusions - as would the
same way of thinking related to terrestrial electricity systems today. Potential microwave
power markets include sites both at different longitudes from Europe, and at different
latitudes.
Moreover, the subject of the present study is “European Strategy in the Light of Global
Sustainable Development” [SOW 2003]. During the 21st century, global electricity
demand is expected to grow to 20 times the demand in Europe. If the possibility of Europe
developing a space-based solar power supply capability is to be considered as a potential
contribution to creating a sustainable global energy supply system, its potential use for
supplying non-European countries could be an important part of the value of such a
project.
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
System combination (WP3)
8-266
· 
North-South power sharing
In the time-frame of 2030 and beyond there are likely to be opportunities for extra-Europe
power sharing between rectennae in Europe and rectennae in countries south of Europe.
These opportunities will increase as demand for electricity in these countries grows, and
they are likely to be based on seasonal demand differences rather than time-zone
differences. In such a case of seasonal power sharing, a satellite could in principle achieve
97% load-factor while two rectennae each achieved 48.5%. In the case of a rectenna
sited in north Africa, the rectenna too could achieve 97% load-factor, while that of the
long-distance cable delivering the power to Europe would be nearer 50%. (If power from
other base load plants in Europe was delivered to Africa during the summer, the cable too
could achieve a high load-factor.) Due to the high insolation in many countries south of
Europe, rectennae are likely to be co-sited with terrestrial solar energy facilities there, as
discussed further in Section 8.2. A further possibility would be sharing power with
rectennae in the southern hemisphere where the winter demand peak coincides with the
summer minimum in Europe.
· 
East-West power sharing
Flexible sharing of the output of a satellite between two (or more) rectennae at different
longitudes could be used to profit from the time-difference between electricity demand
peaks at sites in different time-zones. One potentially promising case is the delivery of
power alternately to rectennae in time zones separated by several hours on the east and
west coasts of the Atlantic; in principle a single satellite could serve both morning and
evening peak loads in both places. The delivery schedule of a satellite that ceased delivery
to one rectenna before starting delivery to the other is shown in Figure 8-21; in this case
the rectennae’ load-factors would be significantly less than 50%.
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
System combination (WP3)
Final Report
8-267
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
C.E.T.
GW delivered
Europe supply
America supply
Figure 8-21: Satellite output sharing between trans-atlantic rectennae (1)
Alternatively, designing transmitting antennae with the capability to deliver power
simultaneously to two widely separated rectennae would enable a delivery pattern as
shown in Figure 8-22. In this case the rectenna load factors could approach 50% and the
satellite 97% (the maximum possible due to eclipses).
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
C.E.T.
GW delivered
America supply
Europe supply
Figure 8-22: Satellite output sharing between trans-atlantic rectennae (2)
Similar opportunities should exist between sites in Europe and sites to the east and south-
east of Europe; they will depend on details of local electricity demand patterns for large
blocks of power within Europe and in places to the East, including Russia, the Middle
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
System combination (WP3)
8-268
East, India and western China, and more particularly on electricity demand patterns in
2030 and beyond. Claverie & Dupas studied this in 1980, using the criterion that a
minimum population density is required in order for electricity demand to be sufficiently
concentrated to be supplied by a rectenna [Claverie 1980]. However, they considered
demand only until 2025, whereas the major growth of world electricity demand is
expected to occur after 2025.
· 
Competition with long-distance power cables
Modes of operating solar power satellites which involve delivering power to widely
separated sites would compete with long-distance terrestrial electric power transmission
via cables. For example, the estimates quoted in Section 4.3.3 give the cost of a 10 GW
capacity cable from north Africa to central Europe as approximately 3.3 billion Euro
[Häusler 1999]; consequently a rectenna in north Africa would cost less than the offshore
rectenna in Europe described in Section 3.3.2a). If the cost of long-distance cable
transmission fell significantly in future with the development of economical super-
conducting cables (whether based on ceramics or on carbon nanotubes) the minimum
distance over which switching of space-based microwave power beams could be
economically attractive would rise.
Optimistic forecasts for this technology, such as the “GENESIS Project” advocated for
more than a decade by Sanyo Corporation [Kuwano, 1990], foresee all national electricity
grids being inter-connected with super-conducting cables to permit large-scale shifting of
solar-generated electric power around the world on a 24-hour basis. Such a development
could even make cable transmission across the Atlantic feasible, and could in principle
make east-west switching of microwave beams between Europe and America less
attractive. However, it could also open up other opportunities, by reducing the cost of
siting rectennae in remote sites where the cost of land was very low.
b) 
Network synergies
As the numbers of satellites and rectennae increased, opportunities for synergy in their
operations would increase, thereby increasing the overall efficiency of their utilisation.
These are similar to the synergies seen in computer networks and mobile-telephone
networks, of which the value increases with the number of members using the network.
In particular, as the number of rectennae increased, the potential value of decoupled
operation would increase, as both satellites and rectennae would each have more
potential partners.
Some rectenna operators might nevertheless make long-term contracts for delivery of
uninterrupted baseload power. However, the additional flexibility that would arise from
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested