E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Energy payback times (WP4)
Final Report
9-279
Nominal
power level
250 MW
1 GW
5 GW
10 GW
Fuel
na
na
na
na
Capacity factor
25%
99.3%
99.3%
99%
Lifetime
30 a
30 a
30 a
30 a
Remarks
Sun Tower,
in MEO
constellation
Solar Disk
in GEO
Solar Disk
in GEO
Solar Disk
in GEO
No energy
storage
Complemented
by energy
storage
Complemented
by energy
storage
Complemented
by energy
storage
Table 9-3: Power plants used in the different scenarios (0.5 GW, 5 GW, 150 GW,
500 GW)
Here, we characterize the four power stations used in the previous scenarios mainly
through their masses (Table 9-4). The “Fresh Look” report allows but a limited detail in
the formulation of the mass breakdown. We have cross-checked the amount of attitude
an orbit control system (AOCS) propellant, using the characteristics and requirements
indicated by Feingold and colleagues [NASA 1997]; their report also includes the specific
figure for the 5-GW plant. A noteworthy point concerns the propellant load that – for the
geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) plants suffices for the first 30 years of operation,
assumed as lifetime in the present Study. Lacking similar data for the medium-altitude
earth orbit (MEO) plant, we can only assume that their propellant load will be replenished
at least once during their useful lifetime, and the figures in Table 9-4 reflect this
assumption. Also, we attempted to model a split of the “platform” mass between
structure and other items (Command & Data Handling (C&DH), etc – i.e. mostly electronic
components).
Unfortunately, the “Fresh Look” report does not include assumption about the rectenna
mass. Herendeen and co-workers (1979) [Herendeen 1979] ran up a rectenna mass
estimate of 6.36 million t, for an assumed surface of 45 km
2
: this obviously correspond to
141,333 t/km
2
, or 141 kg/m
2
. As this would suffice to cover the surface with 16-mm thick
steel plates or (more accurately reflecting their assumptions) 30 mm of concrete covered
with 8 mm of steel, we re-examined the area-specific figures, and assessed the mass of
the panel structure shown in [Hanley 1980] at some 20 kg per square meter of rectenna
land surface.
Change pdf into jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file to jpg on; pdf to jpg converter
Change pdf into jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to gif or jpg; change pdf to jpg on
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Energy payback times (WP4)
9-280
Plant Type
250 MW
1 GW
5 GW
10 GW
Assumption
Unit Mass Breakdown -
Space
Power transmission
t
1384
8387
41858
83716 Electronics
Solar collection
t
1592
2314
11544
23088 Silicon
AOCS
t
30
63
578
1573 Chromium
Structure
t
355
728
6690
15279 Aluminum
C&DH, misc
t
40
40
100
150 Electronics
AOCS propellant
t
300
670
3683
9200 Argon
Pro-rata launch vehicle
t
166
530
1945
3872 Titanium
Pro-rata propellant
t
55856
173775
914388
1886799 LOX+LH2 6:1
Mass of a space segment
unit
t
3701
12202
64453
133006 --
Unit Mass Breakdown -
Ground
Rectenna surface area
(average)
km
2
2.93
9.86
49.31
50.44
Structural elements
t
2051
6902
34517
35308 Aluminum
t
46880
157760
788960
807040 Concrete
t
5860
19720
98620
100880 Steel
Electronic parts
t
3809
12818
64103
65572
Electronic
parts
Mass of a ground segment
unit
t
58603
197210
986249
1008850
Table 9-4: Mass breakdown of the space and ground segments of the various
plants
The number of launches was obtained from the consideration of the mass to be orbited,
while the number of vehicles derived from the assumption that each could perform 12
flight per year; in addition, fleet attrition (through vehicle loss and retirement of high-time
items) was modeled along the lines of the original discussion by Koelle (1997) [Koelle
997]. Finally, the vehicle mass to be procured (Table 9-5), and the propellant mass used in
operations was pro-rated with the number of plants in the respective scenario.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour. If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in
change file from pdf to jpg on; convert multiple pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
PDF document can be easily loaded into your C# String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF
convert pdf image to jpg online; best pdf to jpg converter
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Energy payback times (WP4)
Final Report
9-281
Plant Type
250 MW
1 GW
5 GW
10 GW
Cumulative missions
number for the scenario
90
175
5525
19001
Deployment time scenario
2
5
15
25
Vehicles produced scenario
4
4
42
92
Pro-rated vehicle mass
332 t
530 t
928 t
1220 t
Pro-rata propellant mass
55856 t
173775 t
914388 t
1886799 t
Table 9-5: Summary of earth to low earth orbit (ETLO) transportation parameters
for the different scenarios
Finally, one needs to assess the energy requirements for space transportation: we used
the 6000-t Neptune heavy lift earth launch vehicle (HLLV), a conservative (three-stage)
reusable ballistic system capable of delivering 100 t to lunar orbit [Koelle 1997]. In the
present analysis, Neptune carries its net indicated payload of 350 t to LEO. The Neptune
launcher has an overall dry mass of 663 t, and carries a 4965-t propellant load.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in from local file or stream and convert it into BMP, GIF Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET
change pdf to jpg image; convert pdf file to jpg file
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp Component for combining multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file in C#
convert .pdf to .jpg online; change pdf file to jpg
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Energy payback times (WP4)
9-282
SSME
38.0 m
33.4 m
21.2 m
41.0 m
LH
2
/LO
2
tanks
Figure 9-5: Neptune heavy lift earth launch vehicle (HLLV) [Koelle 2002]
The first stage employs 40 space shuttle main engines (SSME), the second stage employs
9 SSME, the third stage employs either 1 SSME or up to 12 of smaller engines [Koelle
2002].
b) 
Plant installation investments
· 
Materials-embodied energy
To begin the assessment of the energy investment necessary for the production of the
plants, the specific energy intensities for the materials used are necessary. Table 9-6
summarizes such data, as used in previous work paralleling the aims of the present Study,
and illustrates the order of magnitude and the range of the materials energy intensities.
Material
Energy
Requirement
[GJ/t]
Reference
Primary aluminum
173
(GEMIS, 2002)
Argon
32
(Herendeen & al, 1979)
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
convert pdf to jpg for; convert pdf file to jpg format
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
.pdf to jpg; change format from pdf to jpg
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Energy payback times (WP4)
Final Report
9-283
Material
Energy
Requirement
[GJ/t]
Reference
Chromium
116
(GABIE, 2002)
Concrete
1
(GEMIS, 2002)
Primary copper
53
(GEMIS, 2002)
Electronic parts
250
(Herendeen & al, 1979)
Fiberglass
31 - 34
(GEMIS, 2002; Stiller 1999)
Helium
536
Liquid hydrogen
492
(GHW 2001; Air Liquide 2002)
Iron
24
(Meier, 2002)
Primary lead
27
(GEMIS, 2002)
Molybdenum
378
(Meier, 2002)
Liquid oxygen
6
(GEMIS, 2002)
Plastics
54
(Meier, 2002)
Metallurgical silicon
141
(GEMIS, 2002), (KfA, 1992)
Silver
16800
Steel
20
(GEMIS, 2002)
Stainless steel
56
(GEMIS, 2002), (ESU, 1996), (GABIE
2002)
Titanium
920
(Smil, 1999)
Vanadium
3711
(Meier, 2002)
Table 9-6: Materials energy intensity
Following the lead by White & Kulcinski (1998) [White 1998], we computed the embodied
energy in the transportation vehicles based on the energy intensity of titanium: this ought
to result in a very conservative estimate. Further, one should note that the propellant
mixture ratio amounts to 6:1 (liquid oxygen to liquid hydrogen), as the Neptune
configuration used here incorporates Space Shuttle main engines (SSME) engines in the
first two stages.
The number of plants installed per year followed the assumptions quoted in the “Fresh
Look” Study (i.e. up to four Sun Towers, and to two Solar Disks).
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff Turn multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file.
change pdf file to jpg online; convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
XDoc.Tiff for .NET, which can be stably integrated into C#.NET string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List
.pdf to .jpg online; changing pdf to jpg on
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Energy payback times (WP4)
9-284
The updated mass breakdowns for the space and ground segment's units in the different
scenarios are given in Table 9-4, where we have also indicated the materials assumed to
represent the energy intensity of the various components. Clearly, even with the relatively
light rectenna panel, those elements' mass predominate, being actually comparable to the
mass of the propellants needed for orbiting the SPS items.
Using the energy intensities listed in Table 9-6, we then obtain the estimates for the
energy embodied in the materials shown in Table 9-7. The space transportation
propellants do indeed constitute the largest fraction of the materials energy requirements,
followed by the wireless power transmission (WPT) components. Notice that a
significance difference in the relative mass of the power transmission appears between
the Concept Development and Evaluation Program (CDEP) and the Fresh Look Study. The
latter does not give enough detail to explain it fully, especially as the working frequency
moved up to 5.8 GHz; it may be related to a higher power density over the aperture (and
the associated waste-heat rejection issues), to lower mass efficiency of the automatic
orbit installation, or to some other factor. In any case, as the spaceborne transmit antenna
dominates the space plant's mass, it appears as a logical focus for further development
work.
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Energy payback times (WP4)
Final Report
9-285
Space Segment
Power transmission
TJ
346
2097
10465
20929
Solar collection
TJ
224
326
1628
3255
AOCS
TJ
3
7
67
182
Structure
TJ
50
103
950
2170
C&DH, misc
TJ
10
10
25
38
AOCS propellant
TJ
10
21
118
294
Pro-rata launch vehicle
TJ
152
488
1789
3562
Pro-rata LOX
TJ
239
745
3919
8086
Pro-rata LH2
TJ
3926
12214
64268
132615
Energy per unit
TJ
4962
16012
83228
171132
Ground Segment
Aluminum
TJ
291
980
4901
5014
Concrete
TJ
47
158
789
807
Steel
TJ
117
394
1972
2018
Electronic parts
TJ
952
3205
16026
16393
Energy per unit
TJ
1408
4737
23689
48463
Total materials energy  E_mat
TJ
6369
20749
106917
219595
Table 9-7: Energy embodied in the SPS plants' materials
· 
Solar array manufacture
In order to calculate the energy requirements for the PV array the data for the Uni-Solar
UPM-880 module, neglecting both the aluminum frame and the steel backplate has been
used. The resulting blanket, however still builds on a 5-mil (0.127 mm) thick steel foil and
includes an encapsulation of Tefzel
13
/EVA
14
most probably of 6 mil (0.152 mm).
15
In
economic terms, such elements would not represent an optimum for use within a space
system. In energy terms (Table 9-8), the encapsulation is by far the most significant
component, actually followed by the conductive oxide layer; the massive (> 1 kg/m
2
)
substrate contributes only about a tenth of the overall embodied energy. The last two
13
Tefzel is a trademark of DuPont and consists of a modified copolymer of tetrafluoroethylene and ethylene
14
Ethylene vinyl acetate
15 Reference is made here to the thinner blankets produced by Iowa Solar, using a 2-mil polymer backing, and for
which an overall thickness of 8 mils is quoted. Note that UPM-880 no longer appears in the current Uni-Solar
catalog.
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Energy payback times (WP4)
9-286
columns in Table 9-8 document a first linear attempt at scaling those data in the direction
of a blanket for space use: an additional inorganic layer is assumed for the encapsulation,
the substrate is represented by a one-third of the previous encapsulation values, the other
numbers are left unchanged. By consequence, the energy value drops by one-third.
Future technology improvements are subsumed by applying a higher PV module
efficiency. The efficiency of the Uni-Solar UPM-880 module is indicated with 5.7% [Meier
2002] whereas the efficiency of the PV modules assumed for the space system is a
assumed to be 9.2% as indicated in [NASA 1997]. It is possible that the higher efficiency
is achieved by adding more layers which leads to a higher energy requirement for the
manufacturing process. Therefore the reduction of required energy for the production of
space addatped PV modules as done above might be an optimistic approach and might
lead to an underestimate of the required energy for the production.
Item
Material
Fabrication
Scaled -- Material l Scaled -- Fabrication
[MJ/module] [MJ/m²] ] [MJ/module] [MJ/m
2
]
[MJ/m
2
]
[MJ/m
2
]
Encapsulation
90
210
56
137
75
Substrate
10
26
23
56
70
46
PV layer
38
92
92
TCO
40
97
97
Back reflector
7
19
30
74
20
74
Passivation & gridding
14
33
33
Total
255
489
90
417
744
507
Table 9-8: Energy embodied in UPM-880 (approximated, after Keoleian, 2003) &
scaled towards a space blanket
The results from the considerations summarized in Table 9-8, combined with the
parameters from the Solar Disk description, yield the manufacture estimate shown in
Table 9-9.
Plant Type
250 MW
1 GW
5 GW
10 GW
Solar array extension
2844000
11376000
56900000
113760000
Materials consideration
kg/m²
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Energy payback times (WP4)
Final Report
9-287
MJ/m²
28.6
28.6
28.6
28.6
Nominal materials & fabrication (Table 9-8) ) MJ/m²
2
507
507
507
507
Energy intensity increment
MJ/m²
478
478
478
478
Solar array embodied energy
TJ
1361
5442
27210
54420
Table 9-9: Estimate of the energy for the space solar arrays
The energy requirement including the energy intensity of the used materials is 507 MJ per
m
2
. Subtraction of the energy intensity of the materials (28.6 MJ/m
2
) leads to about 478
MJ/m
2
which is needed for the manufacturing process alone. The 28.6 MJ/m
are derived
by multiplying the 0.2 kg/m
2
with the energy intensity of metallurgical silicon.
· 
Launch facilities
Analog to the calculation of the energy requirements for the manufacture of the plants, a
calculation of energy requirements for the erection of the launch facilities has been carried
out. The assessment of the necessary plant's investments has been done by referring to
the Saturn VAB and crawler data, scaling them up to the Neptune masses. The VAB was
conceived to processes up to four Saturn V launchers: here, the assumption was taken
that only two Neptune vehicles be handled in parallel, with a throughput of 50 launchers
per year. Under Koelle's (1997) assumptions, a launch position has a capacity of 25 cycles
per year: accordingly, each assembly building serves two launch positions. Of course, the
number of necessary launch positions follows from the cumulative number of launches,
the plant's system deployment time, and from the position's launch rate capability.
Plant Type
250 MW
1 GW
5 GW
10 GW
Assembly buildings
1
1
8
16
Concrete
t
187'190
187'190
1'497'521
2'995'042
Steel
t
101'672
101'672
813'376
1'626'752
Concrete
TJ
187
187
1'498
2'995
Steel
TJ
2'033
2'033
16'268
32'535
Subtotal buildings
TJ
2'221
2'221
17'765
35'530
Launch positions
2
2
15
31
Concrete
t
509'628
509'628
3'822'206
7'899'227
Steel
t
29'024
29'024
217'683
449'878
Stainless steel
t
254
254
1'904
3'934
Concrete
TJ
510
510
3'822
7'899
Steel
TJ
580
580
4'354
8'998
Stainless steel
TJ
14
14
107
220
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Energy payback times (WP4)
9-288
Plant Type
250 MW
1 GW
5 GW
10 GW
Crawler energy
TJ
13
25
776
2'669
Subtotal positions
TJ
1'117
1'129
9'058
19'786
Total launch facilities
TJ
3338
3350
26823
55316
Table 9-10: Launch facilities assumptions and required energy
· 
Space infrastructure
The concepts discussed in the “Fresh Look” study rely on robotic assembly and relatively
large transfer vehicles for the erection of the space plants. Accordingly, we used the yearly
productivity of the robot as given by Feingold and colleagues in the “Fresh Look” study
[NASA 1997] to assess the size of the robot fleet (Table 9-11)
Similarly, from the payload capacity of the assumed transfer vehicles, we derived the
number of flights and followed to the fleet size through the proportionality factor showing
up in the “Fresh Look” data. Because of the lower Dv requirement for the MEO orbits of
the 250 MW plants, we reduced that fleet size by half (against the assumptions for the
LEO to GEO case). Further the propellant consumption has been reduced for the 250 MW
plants.
Finally, the embodied energy for the space infrastructure results from the fleets and mass
models, using the materials assumptions and data put derived from “Fresh Look” study
[NASA 1997] (Table 9-11).
Plant Type
250 MW
1 GW
5 GW
10 GW
Assembly robot mass
t
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
Annual robot productivity
t
2365.2
2365.2
2365.2
2365.2
Size of required robots fleet
t
7
6
55
113
Transfer vehicle dry mass
t
128
128
128
128
Transfer vehicle payload
t
437
437
437
437
Transfer vehicle propellant load
t
59
118
118
118
No of transfer vehicle's flight per year
36
28
295
608
Required number of transfer vehicles
7
11
121
250
Robots mass
t
4
3
28
57
Transfer vehicles mass
t
940
1'467
15'498
31'981
Argon Propellant
t
4'225
16'478
522'246
1'796'188
Liquid hydrogen
t
10'475
36'373
1'089'809
3'704'954
Liquid oxygen
t
62'849
218'236
6'538'854
22'229'726
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested