E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Energy payback times (WP4)
Final Report
9-329
1
1
1
max
-
÷
ø
ö
ç
è
æ
× +
<
j
I
E
j
q
Any growth rate larger than q
max
leads to a negative energy balance, any growth rate
smaller q
max
results in a positive energy balance.
Finally, the growth rate can be optimized to achieve the largest net energy supply even
during the period of construction.
This results in the optimal growth rate as:
1
1
1
1
1
-
ú
û
ù
ê
ë
é
÷
ø
ö
ç
è
æ
× × × +
-
- -
=
j
opt
I
E
j
j
i j
q
However, such a scenario has only a meaning over a well defined time period. Therefore
over the introduction period of m years the optimum growth rate is given by:
(
)
0
, , , ,
=
=
opt
q q
m
dq
q E I I j
dP
This results in:
1
1
1
-
ú
û
ù
ê
ë
é
÷
ø
ö
ç
è
æ
× × × +
-
=
j
opt
I
E
j
m
j
m
q
A growth rate larger than zero gives a second (self explaining) condition on the scenario:
0>
opt
q
and therefore
j
m
m
I
E
j
-
× + + >
1
or
E
I
j
m
+ >
,
Batch pdf to jpg converter online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf picture to jpg; convert .pdf to .jpg
Batch pdf to jpg converter online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
pdf to jpg converter; .pdf to .jpg online
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Energy payback times (WP4)
9-330
which translates into the trivial result that the addition of new power plants must
continue at least as long as the construction of the first power plant is finished plus the
energy pay back time of an individual installation. Otherwise the energy balance remains
negative.
9.4.2 Energy payback and scenario calculations
Using these formulas helps to calculate net energy balances and growth rates very fast.
This is done in the following by using somewhat simplifying assumptions, which mainly
depend in constant energy investment over the whole scenario and equal distribution of
the energy requirement during the construction. The reference system (European
electricity mix 2020) is not considered i.e. it is not considered that the electricity
generated by the solar systems replaces primary energy required for conventional
electricity generation. Therefore this concept is equivalent to a “solar breeding” concept
where the energy for the construction of new power plants has to be taken from the
energy output of already completed installations.
a) 
Solar power satellites (SPS)
Results for solar power satellites are provided in this chapter. Table 9-52summarizes the
input data used in the calculation.
SPS plant
Symbol
Value
Size of unit
Construction period
Energy requirement during construction
Energy production
Scenario timeline
j
I
E
m
5 GW
2 years
43 TWh
43 TWh
25 years
Table 9-52: SPS plant assumptions for energy payback calculation
Table 9-53 shows the resulting maximum and optimum growth rates. as can be seen from
the table the required installations of up to 500 GW are easily met without stressing the
limits.
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
change pdf to jpg on; convert pdf document to jpg
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Features and Benefits. High speed JPEG to GIF Converter, faster than other JPG Converters; file name when you convert the files in batch; Storing conversion
convert pdf into jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Energy payback times (WP4)
Final Report
9-331
Results SPS
Symbol
Value
Max growth rate
Optimum growth rate
Installed capacity after 25 years (q
opt
)
q
max
q
opt
73%
66%
1,590 TW
Table 9-53: Optimum SPS growth rate for various energy payback times
To illustrate the use of the above derived formulae, the example of the SPS-scenario was
investigated a bit further. In Figure 9-15 a positive energy balance during the scenario
period is only achieved if the annual growth rate remains below 73 %. By far the largest
gain is achieved at an optimal growth rate of 66 %. However, these figures strongly
depend on the annual energy investment (which in turn depends on the construction
time). For instance, if the construction time of a 5 GW unit exceeds 5 years, the maximum
and optimum growth rates are strongly reduced to 43% and 37 %, respectively.
0
100,000
200,000
300,000
400,000
500,000
600,000
700,000
800,000
900,000
1,000,000
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
T
j
=2 years
3 year
4 year
[TWh] cumulative net energy gain
Growth rate
SPS-scenario
Period 25 years
E
0
=43 TWh/yr
I
0
=1* E
0
5 year
Figure 9-15: Cumulative net energy gain over 25 years time period within a SPS-
growth scenario in dependence of the annual growth rate. The construction time
of the individual units is changed between 2 years and 5 years.
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Open JPEG to DICOM Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "DICOM" in
best pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf to jpg converter
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Open JPEG to JBIG2 Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JBIG2" in
convert pdf image to jpg online; changing pdf to jpg on
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Energy payback times (WP4)
9-332
Apart from the cumulative energy balance over the full scenario period, the energy
balance of the final year might be of interest. In Figure 9-16, this is detailed even further
for the scenarios with an assumed construction time of 2 years for a single unit.
0
1,000,000
2,000,000
3,000,000
4,000,000
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0
100,000
200,000
300,000
400,000
Net energy in final year [TWh/yr] 
[TWh/yr] gross energy production
Invested energy
SPS-scenario
Period 25 years
E
0
=43 TWh/yr
I
0
=1 E
0
T
j
=2 years
Growth rate
Net Energy
Gross energy production
Invested 
energy
Figure 9-16: Annual energy balance for the final 25
th
year of the scenarios,
exhibiting the net energy production as difference between the gross energy
production and the energy investment for power plants which are still under
construction.
Finally, Figure 9-17 details the annual energy balance over the full scenario time horizon
for a scenario with the optimum growth rate of 66% per year. Gross energy production,
energy investment and net energy production for the final 25
th
year are the same as in
Figure 9-16 at a growth rate of 66%.
JPG to JPEG2000 Converter | Convert JPEG to JPEG2000, Convert
Open JPEG to JPEG2000 Converter first; ad JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JPEG2000" in
change format from pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg for
JPG to Word Converter | Convert JPEG to Word, Convert Word to JPG
Open JPEG to Word Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "Word" in
best way to convert pdf to jpg; advanced pdf to jpg converter
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Energy payback times (WP4)
Final Report
9-333
0
100,000
200,000
300,000
400,000
500,000
600,000
700,000
800,000
900,000
1,000,000
1
6
11
16
21
SPS-scenario
Period 25 years
E
0
=43 TWh/yr
I
0
=1 E
0
T
j
=2 year
q
opt
=66% p.yr.
[TWh/yr] annual gross energy production
Invested energy
Annual net energy [TWh/yr] 
Year after construction start
Net Energy
Annual gross energy 
production
Annual energy
investment
Figure 9-17: Annual energy balance of the SPS growth scenario at annual growth
rate of 66 %. Shown is the annual energy consumption for power plants still
under construction (red line) and the energy output of already completed power
plants (blue). The thick yellow line gives the annual net energy gain as difference
of these two lines.
A realistic growth scenario, of course, follows a bell shaped growth instead of exponential
growth as assumed here. However, the first half of the growth might be simulated with
an exponential growth scenario to check its feasibility. As soon as the growth decelerates,
the net energy balance is assured anyhow, as the completion of new power plants starts
to rise faster than the energy investment for further power stations which are still under
construction.
b) 
Solar thermal (SOT)
Results for solar power satellites are provided in this chapter. Table 9-54summarizes the
input data used in the calculation. Table 9-55 shows the resulting maximum and optimum
growth rates.
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "PNG" in "Output
.pdf to jpg converter online; best pdf to jpg converter online
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
RasterEdge .NET Imaging PDF Converter makes it non-professional end users to convert PDF and PDF/A documents commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap
batch convert pdf to jpg online; convert pdf pictures to jpg
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Energy payback times (WP4)
9-334
SOT plant
Symbol
Value
Size of unit (Net power output)
Construction period
Energy requirement during construction
Energy production per year
Scenario timeline
j
I
E
m
108 MW
1 year
1.5 TWh
0.907 TWh/yr
25 years
Table 9-54: Assumed energy figures for SOT plant for energy payback calculation
With the data of Table 9-54 the following results are achieved (Table 9-55):
Results SOT
Symbol
Value
Maximum growth rate
Optimum growth rate
Installed capacity after 25 years (q
opt
)
q
max
q
opt
60%
54%
5.3 TW
Table 9-55: Optimum SOT growth rate for various energy payback times
The scenario dependent goals of up to 500 GW are easily met without touching the
restrictions of a positive energy balance.
In Figure 9-18 a positive energy balance during the scenario period is only achieved if the
annual growth rate remains below 60 %. By far the largest gain is achieved at an optimal
growth rate of 54 %. However, these figures strongly depend on the annual energy
investment (which in turn depends on the construction time). For instance, if the
construction time of a 108 MW unit exceeds 2 years, the maximum and optimum growth
rates are strongly reduced to 48% and 42 %, respectively.
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Energy payback times (WP4)
Final Report
9-335
0
2,000
4,000
6,000
8,000
10,000
12,000
14,000
16,000
18,000
20,000
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
T
j
=0.5 years
1 year
2 year
[TWh] cumulative net energy gain
Growth rate
SOT-scenario
Period 25 years
E
0
=0.907 TWh/yr
I
0
=1.66 E
0
Figure 9-18: Cumulative net energy gain over 25 years time period within a SOT-
growth scenario in dependence of the annual growth rate. The construction time
of the individual units is changed between 0.5 years and 2 years.
Apart from the cumulative energy balance over the full scenario period, the energy
balance of the final year might be of interest. In Figure 9-19, this is detailed even further
for the scenarios with an assumed construction time of 1 year for a single unit.
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Energy payback times (WP4)
9-336
0
20,000
40,000
60,000
80,000
100,000
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0
800
1,600
2,400
3,200
4,000
Net energy in final year [TWh/yr] 
[TWh/yr] gross energy production
Invested energy
SOT-scenario
Period 25 years
E
0
=0.907 TWh/yr
I
0
=1.66 E
0
T
j
=1 year
Growth rate
Net Energy
Gross
energy
production
Investigated 
energy
Figure 9-19: Annual energy balance for the final 25
th
year of the scenarios,
exhibiting the net energy production as difference between the gross energy
production (blue line) and the energy investment for power plants which are still
under construction (red line).
Finally, Figure 9-20 details the annual energy balance over the full scenario time frame for
a growth scenario with the optimum growth rate of 54% per year. Gross energy
production, energy investment and net energy production for the final 25
th
year are the
same as in Figure 9-19 at a growth rate of 54 %.
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Energy payback times (WP4)
Final Report
9-337
0
2,000
4,000
6,000
8,000
10,000
5
10
15
20
25
SOT-scenario
Period 25 years
E
0
=0.907 TWh/yr
I
0
=1.66 E
0
T
j
=1 year
q
opt
=0.54
[TWh/yr] annual gross energy production
Invested energy
Annual net energy [TWh/yr] 
Year after construction start
Net Energy
Annual gross energy 
production
Annual energy
investment
Figure 9-20: Annual energy balance of the SOT growth scenario at annual growth
rate of 54 %. Shown is the annual energy consumption for power plants still
under construction (red line) and the energy output of already connected power
plants (blue). The thick yellow line gives the annual net energy gain as difference
of these two lines.
With the help of the above derived formulae fast surveys on energy balances may be
achieved to check various growth scenarios, and to test if a set power target for the final
year x may be achieved with a positive energy balance over the scenario period.
A realistic growth scenario, of course, follows a bell shaped growth factor instead of
constant growth as assumed here. However, the first half of the growth might be
simulated with an exponential growth scenario to check its feasibility. As soon as the
growth rate decelerates, the net energy balance is assured anyhow, as the completion of
new power plants starts to rise faster than the energy investment for further power
stations which are still under construction.
c) 
Photovoltaic (PV)
In 2002 the installed capacity of PV installation has already exceeded 2,200 MW [JRC
2003]. In 2003 the annual PV production has reached 750 MW [Schmela 2004]. For the
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Energy payback times (WP4)
9-338
calculation no hydrogen storage has taken into account because the electricity grid easily
can absorb PV electricity added within the next years. Further PV plants employing “Edge-
defined Film-fed Growth” (EFG) silicon photovoltaic cells employing solar grade silicon
are used in order to compensate for the assumption of a constant energy effort per
installation over the whole time horizon.
The production of photovoltaic modules is rather electricity intensive. Therefore a rather
large share of the primary energy demand is derived from electricity generation. On the
other hand PV plants generate electricity. Therefore for the calculation of the maximum
growth rate and the optimum growth rate it has been assumed that all electricity required
for the PV plants is generated by the PV plants itself (“PV breeder”). The efficiency of
electricity generation from renewable electricity sources such as hydro power, wind power
and solar power is defined to be 100%:
Table 9-56 summjarizes the input parameters for the calculation. Since photovoltaics is
highly modular, any quantity could be taken as starting value (unit size). However, for
small scale installations a realistic construction time is not available. Therefore the world
wide annual installations of the year 2003 are chosen, since their construction time
obviously is in the order of 1 year.
PV plant
Symbol
Value
Size of unit (Net power output)
Construction period
Energy requirement during construction
Energy production per year
Scenario timeline
j
I
E
m
750 MW
1 year
2.15 TWh
0.975 TWh/yr
25 years
Table 9-56: Assumed energy figures for PV plant for energy payback calculation
The production of the PV plants itself requires less than three month including the
production of the raw materials. The construction period indicated in Table 9-56 (1 year)
includes the construction of photovoltaic manufacturing plants which have to be added
during growth of the production capacity. With the data of Table 9-56 the following
results are achieved (Table 9-57):
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested