E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Reliability and risk discussion
Final Report
10-359
The concept of risk thus tries to give an answer to the question "How often will a certain
incident probably occur and what are the consequences?".
Several types of risks are commonly stated:
– Economic risks (e.g. power demand does not develop as projected, currency risk)
– Environmental risks (damage to the environment due to the manufacturing,
installation, operation and decommissioning of the energy system, both accidentally
and as a result of polluting emissions)
– Political risks (e.g. nationalization of private property, terror attack and legal aspects
such as who is the owner of the space respectively who has the rights to harness
space energy?)
– Social risks (e.g. technology is not accepted by the public)
– Technological risks (e.g. major development targets are not reached, such as
efficiency, resource or cost targets or – worst-case – a basic technology turns out to
be not feasible)
Risks may be system immanent; risks may stem from intended or unintended operation
outside of the system's operating parameters; risks may be given depending on the
consequences of terror attacks; and risks may arise from so-called higher forces
depending on the systems' response.
In the framework of this pre-feasibility study qualitative statements are made to describe
major risks and points of discussion with regard to the power system's architectures
applied for scenario building throughout this report. In the following, focus is put on
major potential risks which are perceived and discussed in the public awareness referring
to terrestrial and space-based solar power systems respectively.
10.2.1 Safety
Safety issues are primarily a matter of threats to human health and environment.
a) 
Accidents during system built-up
For the installation of space based power systems an overall great number of space flights
(compared to today) are required. For base load and non-base load scenarios respectively
up to 19,000 launches using an advanced space transports vehicle with a payload
capacity of 350 tons (as assumed for space concepts in chapter 9 ‘Energy payback times
(WP4)’) or even up to more than 600,000 space flights using launch vehicles with 11 tons
of payload capacity as assumed in the Fresh Look Study [NASA 1997]. Highest impact
Convert pdf file to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf pages to jpg online; change file from pdf to jpg
Convert pdf file to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
best program to convert pdf to jpg; .pdf to .jpg converter online
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Reliability and risk discussion
10-360
from space accidents may be assumed during the launching phase. Each Neptune rocket
is initially carrying a propellant mass equivalent to approximately 17 tons TNT. For the
closer neighboring vicinity, this poses no risks – except for the space ground personnel –
provided that safety distances to neighboring buildings are given as usually is. The critical
moment is the period shortly after lift-off. An exploding space vehicle of the Neptune size
certainly poses a risk. Careful selection of appropriate launching sites may ease this
problem, providing the required availability of such sites in Europe. If going outside of
Europe the question of security of energy supply arises.
Depending on the extend of automated construction of space based solar power systems
risks are also given in particular regarding the exposure of space workers to ionizing
radiation [OTA 1981].
b) 
Accidents during system operation
For scenario calculation, microwave was selected as the technology of choice for power
transmission from space to earth. Very high potential safety risks are prevalent in the
event of a failure in beam traction. Especially for systems which transmit large amounts of
power via microwave to earth – like 5 or 10 GW solar power satellites – high safety
impacts on the environment are possible as discussed below in chapter 10.2.2c). A
discussion of potential technical safety measures are given in chapter 10.2.4. To reduce
the impacts of such an accident caused by failure of the microwave beam a highly reliable
emergency shut down of the power transmission via microwave must be proven and
guaranteed for the SPS systems. Since the 1970ies, concepts such as the retro-directive
control system have been discussed and tested on small scale.
10.2.2 Environment and health
a) 
Waste disposal
For the decommissioning of solar power plants no specific assumptions for costs as well
as energy payback calculations are considered and excluded for both space and terrestrial
based scenarios. In contrary to terrestrial based solar power technologies, for the chosen
SPS concepts taken from [NASA 1997] the decommissioning / recycling procedure remains
unclear and are not discussed in the Fresh Look study report.
As the launch parameter discussion for base load and non-base load scenarios has shown
in chapter 7, space transportation is one of the major cost issues for space power systems.
Compared to terrestrial based solar power plants, for systems installed in space orbits the
decommissioning may be more complicated and could cause additional problems. The
development of space recycling options was not considered yet would have to be in the
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the
c# convert pdf to jpg; convert multiple page pdf to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg online
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Reliability and risk discussion
Final Report
10-361
scope of SPS development. Otherwise, there is the risk to rely on parallel space
developments beyond the sphere of influence of SPS development.
On the one hand waste disposal in higher orbits may cause major safety problems and
risks for other satellites or space craft vehicles as well as could promote resource
constraints (loss of secondary resources). On the other hand a recycling of SPS systems in
space requires additional space flights which cause additional costs and environmental
impacts.
For example, [Hazelrigg 1980] assumes that material would not be brought back from
GEO but states that it would be far more valuable when recycled in space or disposed to a
higher ‘disposal orbit’.
b) 
Environmental impacts due to change of heat balance
Aspects of potential environmental impacts on the earth heat balance are already
discussed in the course of energy payback calculation in chapter 9.5. The development
and installation of large-scale power plants, terrestrial as well as space-based, may cause
environmental risks due to change of heat balance. For example [OTA 1981, p. 12]
describes that tropospheric heating may cause minor weather modifications. More
detailed analysis of space and terrestrial concepts are suggested yet depend on further
findings in the field of climatology.
c) 
Impacts of microwave exposure
Due to the fact that very limited experiences are available on power transmission via
microwave in general and no power transmission from space to earth as assumed for the
SPS scenarios exist in particular, several potential risks may be given for vegetation,
animals and human health. To gain satisfactory answers and results as well as to have the
option to exclude those potential risks, a technology analysis with focus on the risk
imposed by microwave radiation is seen critical. Such a detailed analysis was not in the
scope of this study. It was thus not possible to discuss and evaluate these issues in a
satisfactory way. However, the most relevant issues are briefly described only for the sake
of completeness of this report. Public perception on this topic could be a serious hurdle if
not appropriately dealt with.
There is no scientific doubt that high frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) cause
biological effects, i.e. physiological reaction of biological systems. A matter of on-going
scientific effort is to determine the consequences of these effects.
According to [TAB 2003], 20,000 scientific publications (primary studies) have been
published by now plus additional several hundred meta-reports. Nevertheless, the public,
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C# Create PDF from Raster Images, .NET Graphics and REImage File with XDoc Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
change from pdf to jpg; convert multipage pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
best pdf to jpg converter for; batch pdf to jpg converter online
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Reliability and risk discussion
10-362
scientific community and decision makers perceives the current state of knowledge as
unsatisfactory due to the sometimes contradictory scientific results and conclusions on
this topic from the experts’ side.
Generally, it is distinguished between thermal and so-called non-thermal effects of
continuous and pulsed microwave radiation respectively. Compared to an equivalent rate
of energy deposition from a continuous-wave and a pulsed microwave field, the latter
seem to be generally more effective in producing biological response ([ICNIRP 1997], p
506). Yet, scientific evidence is low on this topic. Whereas scientific evidence is prevalent
on thermal effects from microwave radiation, non-thermal effects are still in scientific
discussion. At exposure levels below significant and measurable heating, the evidence of
harmful biological effects is "ambiguous and unproven" according to [OET 1999].
Early 2004, [Sernelius 2004] presented a theoretical model representing the force
interactions of two blood cells in blood. When exposed to microwave fields in the
frequency range of typical cellular phones and radiation densities equal to in-room
temperature thermal radiation, he found that the attractive inter-molecular force was
enhanced by surprising 10 orders of magnitude. The magnitude of the effect can be
subject to personal health condition. Possible health effects remain speculative at this
research stage, yet may result in e.g. contraction of thin blood vessels and growth of
precipitates in tissues and organs (such as eyes). Though the model applied represents a
"crude" first estimation, further research on this topic is advised considering the
magnitude of the effect.
More recently studies from scientific laboratories in (among others) North America and
Europe reported biological effects in animals and animal tissue under relatively low
microwave exposure conditions, such as certain changes in the immune system,
neurological and behavioral effects as well as effects on DNA [OET 1999]. If at all, under
which conditions these effects pose a health hazard remains unclear.
So far, the most decisive scientific parameter for the exposition to high frequency
electromagnetic fields is the so-called SAR value (specific absorption rate).
Exposure of a resting human to electromagnetic fields (EMF) with SAR values between 1
and 4 W/kg results in an increase of body temperature of less than 1°C. Exposure to EMF
producing SAR values greater than 4 W/kg – i.e. 1°C – can “overwhelm the
thermoregulatory capacity of the body and produce harmful levels of tissue heating”
([ICNIRP 1997], p 507). These observations seem to apply to humans and animals alike. In
the discussion on the consequences from EMF exposure in the course of mobile
communication, experts suggest to keep the temperature rise below 0.1°C which would
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
convert multiple pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg for online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. Turn multipage PDF file into image
convert multi page pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Reliability and risk discussion
Final Report
10-363
be a safety factor of 10 below today's scientific evidence. Scientific evidence on adverse
effects from microwave exposure is given in Table 10-3.
Impact/Effect
Method
S [W/m²]
/SAR [W/kg]
Classification
weak indications
indications
strong indications
consistent indications
evidence
Cancer
Cancer, all
Epidemiology
n
Experiment, animal
0,5/
n
Leukaemia
Epidemiology
n
Lymph gland cancer
Epidemiology
n
Experiment, animal
3/0,01
n
Cerebral tumor
Epidemiology
n
Experiment, animal
0,01/
n
Lung cancer
Epidemiology
n
Breast cancer
Epidemiology, women
n
Experiment, animal
10/0,3
n
Eye cancer
Epidemiology
n
Testicular cancer
Epidemiology
n
Skin cancer
Experiment, animal
10/1,2
n
other types of cancer
Epidemiology
n
Experiment, animal
/0,5
n
Central nervous system
Neuroendocrine system m Experiment, animal
/0,6
n
Blood-brain-barrier
Experiment, animal, cell
/1
n
brain functions
Experiment, human
0,01/
n
Experiment, animal
1/
n
Cognitive functions,
Experiment, human
/0,9
n
(learning) behavior
Experiment, animal
/0,07
n
Neuromuscular functionsEpidemiology, children
n
Immune system
Lymphocyte
Experiment, cell
15/1,5
n
Cardiovascular system
Circulation diseases
Epidemiology
n
Variability of heartbeat
frequency
Epidemiology
n
Blood count
Epidemiology
n
Hormone system
Melatonin
Experiment, human
0,5/
n
Experiment, animal
/0,6
n
Stress hormones
Experiment, human
0,2/
n
Experiment, animal
/0,6
n
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif Append one PDF file to the end of another one in NET framework library download and VB.NET online source code
change pdf to jpg online; convert pdf images to jpg
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer: Convert and Export PDF.
batch convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg file
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Reliability and risk discussion
10-364
Impact/Effect
Method
S [W/m²]
/SAR [W/kg]
Classification
weak indications
indications
strong indications
consistent indications
evidence
Reproduction
Infertility
Epidemiology
n
Experiment, animal
0,01/
n
Teratogenicity
Epidemiology
n
Experiment, animal
/2,3
n
Genes
Chromosome aberration,Experiment, human
0,1/
n
Micro cores
Experiment, animal
/0,05
n
Experiment, cell
/0,3
n
DNA fractures
Experiment, animal
10/0,6
n
Experiment, cell
8/2,4
n
DNA syntheses & repair r Experiment, cell
0,9/0,00015
n
Genotoxic effects
Experiment, Mikroorganismen
10/
n
Cell-mediated processes
Experiment, animal
/0,3
n
Gene expression,
transcription, translation
Experiment, cell
0,9/0,0001
n
Cell proliferation,
conversion
Experiment, cell
/1
n
Cell cycle
Experiment, cell
5/
n
Cell communication
Experiment, cell
1/0,001
n
Ca2+ homeostasis
Experiment, cell
/0,03
n
Enzyme activity, ODC
16
Experiment, cell
10/
n
Enzyme activity, others s Experiment, cell
/0,05
n
Table 10-3: Classification of scientific evidence concerning health implications
and biological effects from high-frequency electromagnetic fields [Ecolog 2001]
(LBST translation)
Based on the suggestions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation
Protection (50 W/m² for occupational exposure and 10 W/m² for public exposure regarding
equivalent plane-wave power densities for frequencies between 2 and 300 GHz) ([ICNIRP
1997], p 511) the European Commission proposed common EU exposure limits to its
member countries in 1999. These limits reflect a safety factor of fifty below the lowest
level which was found to trigger acute thermal effects [TAB 2003]. Critics state, that this
exposure limit does not reflect any additional safety factor considering possibly existing
and yet to prove non-thermal effects of high frequency electromagnetic fields.
16
Ornithine Decarboxylase: Important enzyme for the biosynthesis of proteins.
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Reliability and risk discussion
Final Report
10-365
Italy is the only European country which set forth in 1999 exposure limits other than the
EC suggestion. For microwave frequencies in the range of 3 MHz up to 3 GHz, EMF
exposure limits of 1 W/m² (in general) and 0.1 W/m² (maximum indoor exposition in
buildings where people stay longer than 4 hours) were laid down [BMWA 2004]. Italy’s
motivation for more stringent exposure limits than any of the other European countries
based on the ground of the precautionary principle.
In principle, Switzerland adopted the ICNIRP/EC limits, too, with the exemption of so-
called "places with sensitive utilization" where people tend to stay for a longer period of
time. These are places such as living rooms, schools, hospitals or kindergartens. There,
exposure limits are ten times below ICNIRP/EC suggestions (1 W/m²). Analogue to Italy,
Switzerland based its decision on the precautionary principle [BMWA 2004].
In the Former Soviet Union, exposure limits were set to 0.01 W/m² ([OTA 1988], p 259)
which is a factor of 1,000 below the ICNIRP/EC proposition. Since then harmonization
work is underway. Other Eastern European countries [Gajšek 2002] and China [Foster
2002] have exposure limits rather reflecting rigorous Russian standards. Figure 10-4 gives
an overview over Eastern European countries' exposure standards.
Up to date no evidence of health implications and biological effects from high frequency
electromagnetic fields have been found, as seen in Table 10-3.
"Behind these differences [in standards for exposure limits worldwide] are large
differences in perception of science and health protection" [Foster 2002].
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Reliability and risk discussion
10-366
Figure 10-4: Limit values for unlimited public exposure in the frequency range
0.3–300 GHz for several East European countries (1 mW/cm² = 10 W/m²) [Gajšek
2002]
d) 
Reduction of terrestrial solar irradiation
· 
Global dimming
An economic risk for terrestrial based solar power systems could be what is publicly called
'global dimming'. [Stanhill 2001], [Roderick 2002], [Liebert 2002] reported the
phenomenon of continuously reduced terrestrial solar irradiation by an average of 2-
4%/decade since the 1950ies. As the power output of terrestrial solar power plants is
directly linked with the solar irradiation, this would result in lower power productions. It is
assumed that the phenomenon stems from an increasing cloud coverage and aerosol
freight. Both are connected with air pollution and climate change effects. This
phenomenon is scientifically still poorly understood. Further scientific verification is critical
to estimate the degree of implication. In principle, an energy supply from a broad range of
terrestrial and space-based renewable energies can ease this risk by mean of
diversification.
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Reliability and risk discussion
Final Report
10-367
· 
Cloud cover due to climate change
One of the expected effects of global warming is increased evaporation from the oceans.
This in turn would have a range of effects, one of which may be increased cloud cover.
Climate researchers currently do not have adequate data, either historical data on trends
in cloud cover, nor accurate computer simulation models of what is a very complex
atmospheric phenomenon influenced by many factors.  Thus, for example, analysis of the
potential effects of increased cloud cover has led different researchers to predict either
accelerated warming due to a positive feedback mechanism, or decelerated warming
through negative feedback. That is, the water vapour comprising clouds is itself a
greenhouse gas which traps outgoing heat, but clouds also reflect incoming solar
radiation, thus acting to offset solar warming. Hence the overall effects of increased cloud
feedback mechanisms are difficult to estimate, and require better understanding of ocean-
atmosphere coupling.
However, whether it increased or decreased global warming, increased cloud cover would
have a direct effect on terrestrial solar energy production. Specifically, increased cloud
cover would reduce the output per area of solar collectors in proportion to the reduction
in intensity of sunlight at the Earth's surface, leading to the need to use larger areas of
solar collectors for a particular power output. Increased cloud cover could also make
terrestrial solar power systems less dependable as a power source, requiring
proportionately larger areas of solar collectors and larger quantities of energy storage.
By contrast, increased cloud cover would in general have no effect on space-based solar
power systems using microwave power transmission, since clouds are transparent to
microwaves at the wavelengths being studied.
Although laser power transmission is not considered in this report, it may be noted that
increased cloud cover could adversely affect space-based systems using laser power
transmission, since laser light at many wavelengths is strongly absorbed by clouds.
The phenomenon of "global dimming" whereby the intensity of solar energy at the
Earth's surface is measured to have been declining by a few percent/decade for the past
few decades, is said to be due mainly to increased contrails from aircraft and increased air
pollution. However, it may also be partly due to increased cloud cover.
e) 
Possible environmental impacts of effluents from space transportation
The release of water vapor at high altitudes and their possible impacts are discussed for
space scenarios. As a result up to 3.6 million tons of H
2
O would be released into the
tropopause, the stratosphere and in the atmospheric layers above. This is significantly
lower than the natural flow of water vapor from the troposphere (~1,210 million t per
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Reliability and risk discussion
10-368
year) and with the water vapor release of today’s aviation (~40 million t per year). Thus,
this might be acceptable if the world-wide installed SPS capacity remained at 500 GW.
Further details as well as the discussion of NO
x
emissions are given in Annex A6.
f) 
Pumped hydro storage
Pumped hydro storage was assumed as one storage option for terrestrial and space solar
power scenarios. This technology is subject to topographical limitations. Huge land areas
would be required to apply this technology especially with the 500 GW scenarios. Beside
environmental aspects, public acceptance of very large-scale application of pumped hydro
is likely. Large pumped hydro storage facilities are vulnerable towards military/sabotage
actions.
10.2.3 Social
[OTA 1981, p. 10] describes the “discussion of SPS has been limited to a small number of
public interest groups and professional societies. [...] Key issues that may enter into public
thinking include environmental and health risks, land-use, military implications and costs.
Centralization in the decision making process and in the ownership and control of SPS
may also be important.”
Risks, risk perception and public acceptance are usually different sides of the same coin.
Even if assuming that all risks can be measured, risk perception and even more the public
acceptance of risks generally tend to be a matter of personal experiences and values.
Thus, any informed discussions about science and risks easily meet discussions about
society and values [Duncan 2004] [Bouder 2004]. A discussion on risk perception and
acceptance is beyond the scope of this study but has to be seen critical for a successful
broad-scale introduction of any (especially large-scale / high impact) energy system.
A discussion of land-use issues are relevant for both space and terrestrial scenarios. There,
two aspects seem to be mostly relevant. Firstly, the area requirement of plant facilities:
Largely distributed, small-sized plants (such as PV) may acquire higher acceptance
compared to large areas with restricted public access (such as SPS and SOT) even if the
overall area requirements are larger. An overview over land area requirements is given in
Table 10-4.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested