how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc using c# : Convert .pdf to .jpg online application control cloud windows web page html class GSP-RPT-SPS-0503%20LBST%20Final%20Report%20Space%20Earth%20Solar%20Comparison%20Study%20050318%20s4-part1994

E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
General
Final Report
1-29
SPS
SOT
PV
Wind
Fossils
Nuclear
Geothermal
Biomass
Hydro
Demand side energy
management
Political factors:
·liberalized energy market
·emission trade
·energy security
Transportation fuel 
Gas and oil depletion 
Non renewable
renewable
Energy saving/efficiency
EXTERNAL FACTORS
DEMAND
SUPPLY
Figure 1-5: Parameters which are marked by a red circle have been considered
explicitly in the framework of this study (whether nuclear breeding belongs to
the renewable category or not is controversial)
Regarding the scenario design, work package 1 (base load scenarios) and work package 2
(remaining load scenarios) represent the two extremes of possible earth and space based
applications of solar power production. These basic scenarios are far from the reality of a
divers energy economy. They should not be considered apart from the scenarios assessed
in work package 3 (combination of terrestrial and space based power systems) and
additional alternative scenarios (mix of renewable energies and hydrogen as
transportation fuel). Nevertheless, both work package 1 and work package 2 scenarios
may give an impression on the different advantages and disadvantages when applying
earth and space solar power systems.
The terrestrial part concentrates on direct solar electricity production only. Due to the
fluctuating nature of renewable energy production, the isolation of just one segment is
somewhat artificial and does not reflect a development which can be expected to happen
over the next decades. Almost any renewable energy technology has its fluctuating
primary energy flux pattern. Since these fluctuations are independent between different
Convert .pdf to .jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file to jpg file; convert pdf pages to jpg online
Convert .pdf to .jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
bulk pdf to jpg converter; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
General
1-30
sources (e.g. wind or hydropower fluctuations are not correlated to the solar flux), any
realistic scenario should apply a mix of several renewable technologies, where the share
of the individual technologies might be adapted to the regional context. In such a
complex scenario the individual fluctuations will interfere and partly compensate each
others deficits. This results in a smoothed supply pattern.
Isolating a single technology for such a comparison however requires large efforts to
compensate the deficits by storing the supplied electricity for times of preponderant
demand.
A fundamental difference between terrestrial PV and space-based solar power systems
(SPS) are their different target markets. Whereas terrestrial PV supplies energy to the local
power grid (i.e. private consumer market), SPS supplies the high-voltage grid (i.e. bulk
power market). Thus, target costs to meet market competitiveness are less stringent for
terrestrial PV than for SPS. Yet, in this study for non-base load power supply economic
competitiveness with PV are assumed.
Non-base load scenario design implies extremely pessimistic cost figures for space-based
solar power due to the very low system utilization and geographic limitation on Europe
solely. This also applies to terrestrial solar power plants, yet to a lower magnitude.
These model restrictions should be kept in mind when analyzing the results of the
comparison on a single technology level. Nevertheless, such a technological comparison is
a first step towards an integrated systems approach and has to be done before more
complex models and interactions are studied.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert multiple page pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
change from pdf to jpg; convert pdf file into jpg
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Solar technology
Final Report
2-31
2 
S
OLAR TECHNOLOGY
2.1 
Photovoltaics (PV)
In 2003, about 750 MW
p
of PV modules are produced worldwide. The production capacity
grew from 560 MW
p
(2002) to 750 MW
p
in 2003 [Schmela 2004]. Almost 50% thereof
came from Japan alone (Europe: 27%, USA: 12.8%).
A broad range of PV technologies coexist at various development stages. Each technology
has its specific technological and economic advantages respectively disadvantages. In the
subsequent chapters, these technologies are further described in brief. Their potential for
today and a possible future (2030) broad scale application is examined as well as critical
factors which may hinder their market penetration.
In the course of the first project workshop at ESTEC in Noordwijk/The Netherlands, it was
jointly agreed to apply the following key assumptions for terrestrial as well as space PV
applications throughout the two consortia:
T O D A Y
2 0 3 0
14%
Monocrystalline
module
21%Monocrystalline module
8%
Thin film module
15%Thin film module
Efficiency
-
GaAs technology
not applied in
short-term
20%GaAs module
Learning
curve start
4,500EUR/kW
p
Poly and mono
crystalline system
Learning
curve
factor
20%
Poly and mono
crystalline system
cost decrease when
doubling installed
capacities
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
convert pdf to jpg c#; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
convert multi page pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg format
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Solar technology
2-32
T O D A Y
2 0 3 0
Learning
curve start
4,500EUR/kW
p
Terrestrial thin film
system
Learning
curve
factor
20%
Terrestrial thin film
system cost
decrease when
doubling installed
capacities
Cost space
modules
25% Cost decrease compared to
terrestrial thin film modules
Table 2-1: Basic assumptions agreed upon by both consortia
2.1.1 Technologies
A number of different types of commercial solar cells exist so far: solar cells made with
silicon (Si), GaAs (Gallium Arsenid), CdTe (Cadmium Telluride) or CIS
(Copper/Indium/Selenium). The market share and the historical development of different
PV cell technologies is depicted in Figure 2-1.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
conversion pdf to jpg; change file from pdf to jpg on
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
.pdf to .jpg converter online; changing pdf to jpg
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Solar technology
Final Report
2-33
Figure 2-1: Share of PV cell technologies applied worldwide in % [Schmela 2004]
In 2003, more than 90% of the solar cell market production were solar cells fabricated
with silicon. Among silicon solar cells, more and more cells are fabricated with multi-
crystalline silicon (mc-Si) (57.2%) compared to mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si) with 32.2%.
Thin film solar cells are mainly made in amorphous silicon (a-Si) (4.5%).
CIS solar cells which have a share below 1% are by far more successful than CdTe solar
cells. This is due to the fact that cadmium was partially banned by Europe, and CdTe solar
cells don’t have advantages compared to CIS solar cells. CIS solar module production is
less mature than a-Si solar module production. However, experts point out that CIS solar
modules have a high potential compared to other thin film cell technologies because of
their proven high solar cell efficiency with a record breaking 18.8%.
Crystalline silicon cells show a proven record efficiency above 27%.The highest efficiency
above 30% has bee achieved with a GaInP/GaAs/Ge tandem-cell. Still higher efficiencies
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Jpeg, VB.NET compress PDF, VB.NET print PDF, VB.NET merge PDF files, VB.NET view PDF online, VB.NET Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
change pdf file to jpg file; convert pdf file into jpg format
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
change pdf to jpg format; convert pdf to jpg for online
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Solar technology
2-34
above 35% are achieved with concentrating systems. This topic is also briefly sketched
below.
a) 
Cell and Module
The production of solar cells is akin to the manufacturing of semiconductors. Similar
production processes are applied, especially with the production of thin film solar cells
(sputter, gas deposition etc.). However, in contrary to semiconductor industry the
requirements on material quality are by far less restrictive. Semiconductor manufacturing
is based on highly sophisticated production technologies enabling complicated electronic
processes at smallest scale. PV cell manufacturing has the opposite goal of producing
largest scale with moderate material requirements. By now, the manufacturing
technology of solar cells is not yet optimized to reach that goal with the highest
efficiency. The potential for further cost reductions is still large. Future cost reductions are
expected from enlarged production volumes.
A solar module consists of a number of solar cells which are connected in series/parallel
and finally encapsulated. The performance decreases from solar cells to module
production because current and fill factor are loosen in solar cell connections and often
after encapsulation (less light). Therefore, efficiencies differ depending on whether a solar
cell, mini-module or module production is considered.
The ambient conditions, under which a module will be operated, also determine the
connections and encapsulation type, which will be different whether solar modules are
operated in space (e.g. GEO or LEO orbit) or on earth (e.g. on a boat or on a Swiss or
Saharan roof).
· 
Theoretical limits of solar cell efficiency
Figure 2-2 shows the solar spectral irradiation with respect to the wavelength of the
emitted photons. This spectrum is very close to the theoretical thermal radiation spectrum
of an ideal black radiator with a temperature of 5,762 K. Therefore that temperature
defines the suns radiation spectrum. The overall efficiency of a solar cell is the higher the
better its specific band gap matches with the spectrum of radiation.
These introductory considerations explain major factors influencing the efficiency of a
solar cell. However, a detailed discussion has to consider additional effects, e.g. the solar
spectrum which is distorted by the atmosphere which has an influence on the efficiency
curve.
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Solar technology
Final Report
2-35
Linear Plot ETR ASTM E-490 vs. Wehrli WMO
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
1800
2000
2200
0
0,5
1
1,5
2
2,5
3
3,5
4
Wavelength micrometers
-Spectral Irradiance W*m*micron
Figure 2-2: Solar spectrum measured in space at AMO [Smith 1974]
Only those photons from the solar spectrum can initiate electric currents within a
semiconductor whose energy exceeds the band gap of the semiconductor under
investigation as explained in Figure 2-3. If an electron receives the energy E>E
gap
it can
escape from its fixed location and move around (in technical terms: the electron is shifted
from the valence band to the conduction band).
valence band
conduction band
Energy
Energy gap, E
gap
-
incident light with
energy E>E
gap
Figure 2-3: Energy gap of a semiconductor and energy transfer from incident
photon to electrons
It can return to its initial location either by spontaneous recombination – which usually is
the case in pure semiconductors – or via a conductive wire and produce electricity. A solar
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Solar technology
2-36
cell is optimized in a way that the excited electrons move away before spontaneous
recombination may occur. This movement is forced by the intrinsic electric field in the
transition regime of a p/n-diode as sketched in Figure 2-4.
n – doped
p-doped
incident light with
energy E>E
gap
+
Figure 2-4: Schematic cross section through a solar cell. The light penetrates the
solar cell. Photons with a higher energy than the band gap may excite electrons
in a way that a pair of electron/hole is generated. The intrinsic field pushes the
electron away from the transition zone between the p- and n-doped layers. A
recombination is thus avoided. The electron then makes its way through the
external circuit where it may be measured as an electrical current.
The band gap E
gap
of any semiconductor corresponds to a certain wavelength of the
photons. For instance, for silicon, any photon with wavelength below 1 micrometer can
excite an electron into the valence band. Consequently, each photon with wave length
larger than 1 µm heats up the semiconductor or passes the semiconductor without
collisions, but cannot contribute to electricity production. Therefore, the lower the band
gap, the more electrons can be excited to produce electricity. But on the other hand, each
electron in the valence band can contribute to electricity production only with the fixed
energy amount of the band gap, E
gap
. The Energy amount of the photon with E>E
gap
,
again, is converted into heat not contributing to electricity production. These two
parameters determine that only a certain amount of solar radiation can be converted into
electricity: Just because only part of solar photons contributes to electricity production,
and from these photons only a certain energetic fraction is converted into electricity.
Beyond these basic principles, additional restrictions limit the efficiency even further:
1. Not every photon which hits the semiconductor, transfers its energy to the electron.
2. Inside the semiconductor, an electrical field builds up. A certain fraction of electrons
tends to recombine before it can be removed from the remaining ion. Once too many
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Solar technology
Final Report
2-37
electrons are excited into the valence band, spontaneous recombination starts which
again reduces the amount of electrons, which take the bypass through the conducting
wire.
3. The ambient temperature of the semiconductor has an additional influence on the
ability of spontaneous recombination or excitation.
Putting all aspects together results in a (slightly simplified) theoretical maximal conversion
efficiency depending on the band gap of the solar cell as shown in Figure 2-5. At best
30% of the incident light energy can be converted into electricity with a semiconductor
with band gap of 1.25 eV. Any deviation from this figure further reduces the efficiency.
E
gap 
(eV)
1
2
3
0
h
theoretical
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
T
ambient
=300 K
Ge
Si
GaAs
CdTe
CdSe
Figure 2-5: Theoretical maximum efficiency of a solar cell depending on its band
gap energy. This efficiency curve is adapted to 300 K cell temperature and AM0
spectrum (solar spectrum in space). Only multi-junction cell can exceed this
figure.
These theoretical figures are further diminished by geometrical constraints. Only a certain
fraction of light is absorbed within a fixed distance. The thicker the material, the more
photons are absorbed, and vice versa, the thinner the cell, the less photons are absorbed
and the efficiency reduces corresponding to the absorbed fraction.  This is the major
reason behind the low efficiencies of thin film cells. By light reflection at the back side the
light absorption and consequently the efficiency can still be enhanced.
The efficiency can still be increased by several measures, e.g. by means of double junction
and multi junction thin film solar cells. An increase of the solar flux density by
E
ARTH AND 
S
PACE
-B
ASED 
P
OWER 
G
ENERATION 
S
YSTEMS 
– A C
OMPARISON 
S
TUDY
Final Report
Solar technology
2-38
concentration also raises the efficiency. The best results are achieved when different cells
with different band gaps are used and the incident solar spectrum is split directing each
segment of wavelengths towards the appropriate cell, e.g. one cell which absorbs high
energetic photons and another cell which absorbs low energetic photons. Since the not
absorbed photons penetrate through the cell without interaction, these two cells can be
build above each other (sandwich concept). The more the solar spectrum is split and
directed to its corresponding cell the higher is the conversion efficiency, partly
compensating for the low absorption of thin films.
· 
Thick Film: Single-crystal (mono-Si) and poly-crystal (poly-Si) silicon cells
Thick film solar cells are by far the best investigated solar material where most experience
and best knowledge exists. 92% of the production volumes are silicon based solar cells,
with the majority being crystalline thick film cells. This, of course, is due to the broad
experience which was already gained within the conventional semiconductor industry.
Another fact is that these cells may be produced from semiconductor material of lower
quality. The semiconductor industry is thus the major supplier of today's silicon feedstock
for PV cells. This synergy facilitated the introduction of silicon PV technology in terrestrial
markets. At the other hand, the application of semiconductor byproduct as feedstock is a
constraint towards cheaper cells. These will be based once the crude material, the
crystalline silicon, is produced exclusively for the solar market, since the requirements are
considerably lower than on silicon used by the semiconductor industry. In recent years,
more and more the silicon cell was reduced to smaller thickness. Starting with some 250-
300 µm, researchers reduced the size to 150 µm with improved saws. The increasing
market of the last years has helped to address the problem of reducing material
requirements further. Smaller silicon amounts are consumed by different growth concepts,
where the silicon is not grown from large single crystals with several inches in diameter –
as appropriate for semiconductor industry – but with different flow techniques allowing
for less material requirement already from the beginning.
The progress in terms of efficiency for silicon thick film cells and the whole module are
given in the following Figure 2-6.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested