CHAPTER 6
Identity management
This section includes the following topics:
u
Identity management..........................................................................................122
u
Identity types......................................................................................................122
u
Access tokens.....................................................................................................123
u
Access token generation.....................................................................................124
Identity management
121
Convert pdf file to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file into jpg format; .net convert pdf to jpg
Convert pdf file to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
c# convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg online
Identity management
In environments with several different types of directory services, OneFS maps the users
and groups from the separate services to provide a single unified identity on the EMC
Isilon cluster and uniform access control to files and directories, regardless of the
incoming protocol. This process is called identity mapping.
Isilon clusters are frequently deployed in multiprotocol environments with multiple types
of directory services, such as Active Directory and LDAP. When a user with accounts in
multiple directory services logs in to an Isilon cluster, OneFS combines the user’s
identities and privileges from all the directory services into a native access token. You
can configure OneFS settings to include a list of rules for token manipulation to control
user identity and privileges. For example, you can set a user mapping rule to merge an
Active Directory identity and an LDAP identity into a single token that works for access to
files stored over both SMB and NFS. The token can include groups from Active Directory
and LDAP. The mapping rules that you create can solve identity problems by
manipulating access tokens in many ways, including the following examples:
u
Authenticate a user with Active Directory but give the user a UNIX identity.
u
Select a primary group from competing choices in Active Directory or LDAP.
u
Disallow login of users that do not exist in both Active Directory and LDAP.
For more information about identity management, see the white paper 
Managing
identities with the Isilon OneFS user mapping service
(white paper) at EMC Online
Support (https://support.emc.com).
Identity types
OneFS supports three primary identity types, each of which can be stored directly on the
file system. These types are user identifier and group identifier for UNIX, and security
identifier for Windows.
When you log on to an Isilon cluster, the user mapper expands your identity to include
your other identities from all the directory services, including Active Directory, LDAP, and
NIS. After OneFS maps your identities across the directory services, it generates an
access token that includes the identity information associated with your accounts. A
token includes the following identifiers:
u
A UNIX user identifier (UID) and a group identifier (GID). A UID or GID is a 32-bit
number with a maximum value of 4,294,967,295.
u
A security identifier (SID) for a Windows user account. A SID is a series of authorities
and sub-authorities ending with a 32-bit relative identifier (RID). Most SIDs have the
form S-1-5-21-A-B-C-<RID> , where A, B, and C are specific to a domain or
computer and 
<RID>
denotes the object in the domain.
u
A primary group SID for a Windows group account.
u
A list of supplemental identities, including all groups in which the user is a member.
The token also contains privileges that stem from administrative role-based access
control.
On an Isilon cluster, a file contains permissions, which appear as an access control list
(ACL). The ACL controls access to directories, files, and other securable system objects.
When a user tries to access a file, OneFS compares the identities in the user’s access
token with the file’s ACL. OneFS grants access when the file’s ACL includes an access
control entry (ACE) that allows the identity in the token to access the file and that does
Identity management
122
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the
convert pdf picture to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter for
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
change pdf to jpg format; convert multipage pdf to jpg
not include an ACE that denies the identity access. OneFS compares the access token of
a user with the ACL of a file.
Note
For more information about access control lists, including a description of the
permissions and how they correspond to POSIX mode bits, see the white paper titled
EMC Isilon multiprotocol data access with a unified security model
on the EMC Online
Support web site (https://support.emc.com).
When a name is provided as an identifier, it is converted into the corresponding user or
group object and the correct identity type. There are various ways that a name can be
entered or displayed:
u
UNIX assumes unique case-sensitive namespaces for users and groups. For example,
"Name" and "name" represent different objects.
u
Windows provides a single, case-insensitive namespace for all objects and also
specifies a prefix to target an Active Directory domain (for example, domain\name).
u
Kerberos and NFSv4 define principals, which require names to be formatted the same
way as email addresses (for example, name@domain.com).
Multiple names can reference the same object. For example, given the name "support"
and the domain "example.com", support, EXAMPLE\support, and support@example.com
are all names for a single object in Active Directory.
Access tokens
An access token is created when the user first makes a request for access.
Access tokens represent who a user is when performing actions on the cluster and supply
the primary owner and group identities to use during file creation. Access tokens are also
compared against the ACL or mode bits during authorization checks.
During user authorization, OneFS compares the access token, which is generated during
the initial connection, with the authorization data on the file. All user and identity
mapping occurs during token generation; no mapping takes place during permissions
evaluation.
An access token includes all UIDs, GIDs, and SIDs for an identity, in addition to all OneFS
privileges. OneFS exclusively uses the information in the token to determine whether a
user has access to a resource. It is important that the token contains the correct list of
UIDs, GIDs, and SIDs.
An access token is created from one of the following sources:
Source
Authorization method
-
-
Username
SMB impersonate user
Kerberized NFSv3
Kerberized NFSv4
mountd root mapping
HTTP
FTP
Privilege Attribute Certificate (PAC) ) SMB NTLM
Active Directory Kerberos
Identity management
Access tokens
123
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
convert pdf file into jpg; convert pdf to jpg file
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg
Source
Authorization method
-
-
User identifier (UID)
NFS AUTH_SYS mapping
Access token generation
For most protocols, the access token is generated from the username or from the
authorization data retrieved during authentication.
The process of token generation and user mapping is described below:
1. Using the initial identity, the user is looked up in all configured authentication
providers in the access zone, in the order in which they are listed, until a match is
found. An exception to this behavior occurs if the AD provider is configured to call
other providers, such as LDAP or NIS. The user identity and group list are retrieved
from the authenticating provider. Any SIDs, UIDs, or GIDs are added to the initial
token.
2. All identities in the token are queried in the ID mapper. All SIDs are converted to their
equivalent UID/GID and vice versa. These ID mappings are also added to the access
token.
3. If the username matches any user mapping rules, the rules are processed in order
and the token is updated accordingly. (For details about user mapping rules, see
"User mapping.")
The default on-disk identity is calculated using the final token and the global setting.
These identities are used for newly created files.
ID mapping
The ID mapping service maps Windows SIDs to UNIX UIDs and, conversely, to control
access consistently across protocols. Administrators with advanced knowledge of UNIX
and Windows identities can modify the default settings that determine how identities are
mapped in the system.
Note
Identity (ID) mapping and user mapping are different services, despite the similarity in
names.
During authentication, the ID mapping service associates Windows identifiers with UNIX
identifiers. When a user connects to a cluster over NFS, the ID mapping service maps the
user’s UID and GID to a SID for access to files that another user stored over SMB. In the
same way, when a user connects to the cluster over SMB with a SID, the service maps it
to a UID and GID for access to files stored over NFS by a UNIX client. By default, the ID
mapping service matches accounts with the same name.
Mappings are stored in a cluster-distributed database called the ID mapper. When
retrieving a mapping from the database, the ID mapper takes a source and target identity
type as input. If a mapping already exists between the specified source and the
requested type, that mapping is returned; otherwise, a new mapping is created. Each
mapping is stored in the ID mapper database as a one-way relationship from the source
to the target identity type. Two-way mappings are stored as complementary one-way
mappings.
Identity management
124
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C# Create PDF from Raster Images, .NET Graphics and REImage File with XDoc Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
.net pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. Turn multipage PDF file into image
bulk pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf to jpg for
Mapping Windows IDs to UNIX IDs
If a caller requests a SID-to-UID or SID-to-GID mapping, OneFS must first locate the Active
Directory user or group that is associated with the SID.
After locating the Active Directory user or group, OneFS applies the following rules in the
order listed to create two mappings, one in each direction:
1. If the object has an associated UID or GID through an external mapping, create a
mapping from the SID.
2. If a mapping for the SID already exists in the ID mapper database, use that mapping.
3. Determine whether a lookup of the user or group is necessary in an external source,
according to the following conditions:
l
The user or group is in the primary domain or one of the listed lookup domains.
l
Lookup is enabled for users or groups.
4. If a lookup is necessary, perform these steps:
a. By default, normalize the user or group name to lowercase.
b. Search all authentication providers except Active Directory for a matching user or
group object by name.
c. If an object is found, use the associated UID or GID to create an external mapping.
5. Allocate an automatic mapping from the configured range.
Mapping UNIX IDs to Windows IDs
OneFS creates temporary UID-to-SID and GID-to-SID mappings only if the caller requests a
mapping that does not already exist. The “UNIX SIDs” that result from these mappings
are never stored on disk.
UIDs and GIDs have a set of pre-defined mappings to and from SIDs.
If a UID-to-SID or GID-to-SID mapping is requested, a temporary UNIX SID is generated in
the format S-1-22-1-<UID> or S-1-22-2-<GID> by applying the following rules:
u
For UIDs, generate a UNIX SID with a domain of S-1-22-1 and a resource ID (RID)
matching the UID. For example, the UNIX SID for UID 600 is S-1-22-1-600.
u
For GIDs, generate a UNIX SID with a domain of S-1-22-2 and a RID matching the
GID. For example, the UNIX SID for GID 800 is S-1-22-2-800.
User mapping across systems and identities
User mapping provides a way to control permissions by specifying a user's security
identifiers, user identifiers, and group identifiers. OneFS uses the identifiers to check file
or group ownership.
With the user mapping service, you can apply rules to modify which user identity OneFS
uses, add supplemental user identities, and modify a user's group membership. The
OneFS user mapper provides a way to control the permissions given to users by
specifying user and group identifiers (SIDs, UIDs, and GIDs) for a user. The user mapping
service combines a user’s identities from different directory services into a single access
token and then modifies it according to the rules that you set.
Identity management
User mapping across systems and identities
125
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. C#.NET WPF PDF Viewer Tool: Convert and Export PDF.
convert from pdf to jpg; conversion of pdf to jpg
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List in imagePaths) { Bitmap tmpBmp = new Bitmap(file); if (null Use C# Code to Convert Png to Tiff.
change pdf to jpg file; conversion pdf to jpg
Note
You can configure mapping rules when you create an access zone. OneFS maps users
only during login or protocol access.
If you do not configure rules, a user who authenticates with one directory service receives
full access to the identity information in other directory services when the account names
are the same. For example, a user who authenticates with an Active Directory domain as
Desktop\jane automatically receives permissions for the corresponding UNIX user
account for jane from LDAP or NIS.
In the most common scenario, OneFS is connected to two directory services, Active
Directory and LDAP. In such a case, the default mapping provides a user with a UID from
LDAP and a SID from the default group in Active Directory. The user's groups come from
Active Directory and LDAP, with the LDAP groups added to the list. To pull groups from
LDAP, the mapping service queries the memberUid. The user’s home directory, gecos,
and shell come from Active Directory.
User mapping guidelines
You can create and configure user mapping rules in each access zone, following these
guidelines.
By default, every mapping rule is processed. This behavior allows multiple rules to be
applied, but can present problems when applying a “deny all" rule such as "deny all
unknown users." Additionally, replacement rules may interact with rules that contain
wildcard characters.
To minimize complexity when configuring multiple mapping rules, it is recommended that
you group rules by type and organize them in the following order:
1. Replacements: Any user renaming should be processed first to ensure that all
instances of the name are replaced.
2. Joins: After the names are set by any replacement operations, use join, add, and
insert rules to add extra identifiers.
3. Allow/deny: All processing must be stopped before a default deny rule can be
applied. To do this, create a rule that matches allowed users but does nothing (such
as an add operator with no field options) and has the break option. After enumerating
the allowed users, a catchall deny may be placed at the end to replace anybody
unmatched with an empty user.
Within each group of rules, put explicit rules before rules involving wildcard characters;
otherwise, the explicit rules might be skipped.
Elements of user-mapping rules
You combine operators with user names to create a user-mapping rule.
The following elements affect how the user mapper applies a rule:
u
The operator, which determines the operation that a rule performs
u
Fields for usernames
u
Options
u
A parameter
u
Wildcards
Identity management
126
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
Mapping rule operators
The operator determines what a mapping rule does.
You can create user-mapping rules through either the web-administration interface,
where the operators are spelled out in a list, or from the command-line interface.
When you create a mapping rule with the OneFS command-line interface (CLI), you must
specify an operator with a symbol. The operator affects the direction in which the
mapping service processes a rule. For more information about creating a mapping rule,
see the white paper 
Managing identities with the Isilon OneFS user mapping service
. The
following table describes the operators that you can use in a mapping rule.
A rule can contain only one operator.
Operator
Web interface
CLI
Direction
Description
-
-
-
-
-
append
Append fields
from a user
++ Left-to-right t Modifies an access token by adding fields to
it. The mapping service appends the fields
that are specified in the list of options (user,
group, groups) to the first identity in the
rule. The fields are copied from the second
identity in the rule. All appended identifiers
become members of the additional groups
list. An append rule without an option
performs only a lookup operation; you must
include an option to alter a token.
insert
Insert fields
from a user
+= Left-to-right t Modifies an existing access token by adding
fields to it. Fields specified in the options
list (user, group, groups) are copied from
the new identity and inserted into the
identity in the token. When the rule inserts a
primary user or primary group, it become the
new primary user and primary group in the
token. The previous primary user and
primary group move to the additional
identifiers list. Modifying the primary user
leaves the token’s username unchanged.
When inserting the additional groups from
an identity, the service adds the new groups
to the existing groups.
replace
Replace one
user with a
different user
=> Left-to-right t Removes the token and replaces it with the
new token that is identified by the second
username. If the second username is empty,
the mapping service removes the first
username in the token, leaving no
username. If a token contains no username,
OneFS denies access with a 
no such
user error
.
remove
groups
Remove
supplemental
groups from a
user
--
Unary
Modifies a token by removing the
supplemental groups.
Identity management
User mapping across systems and identities
127
Operator
Web interface
CLI
Direction
Description
-
-
-
-
-
join
Join two users
together
&= Bidirectional l Inserts the new identity into the token. If the
new identity is the second user, the
mapping service inserts it after the existing
identity; otherwise, the service inserts it
before the existing identity. The location of
the insertion point is relevant when the
existing identity is already the first in the list
because OneFS uses the first identity to
determine the ownership of new file system
objects.
Mapping rule options
Mapping rules can contain options that target the fields of an access token.
A field represents an aspect of a cross-domain access token, such as the primary UID and
primary user SID from a user that you select. You can see some of the fields in the OneFS
web adminstration interface. User in the web administration interface is the same as
username. You can also see fields in an access token by running the command isi
auth mapping token. For more information about running this command, see View
on-disk identity.
When you create a rule, you can add an option to manipulate how OneFS combines
aspects of two identities into a single token. For example, an option can force OneFS to
append the supplement groups to a token.
A token includes the following fields that you can manipulate with user mapping rules:
u
username
u
unix_name
u
primary_uid
u
primary_user_sid
u
primary_gid
u
primary_group_sid
u
additional_ids (includes supplemental groups)
Options control how a rule combines identity information in a token. The break option is
the exception: It stops OneFS from processing additional rules.
Although several options can apply to a rule, not all options apply to all operators. The
following table describes the effect of each option and the operators that they work with.
Option
Operator
Description
-
-
-
user
insert, append
Copies the primary UID
and primary user SID, if
they exist, to the token.
groups
insert, append
Copies the primary GID
and primary group SID, if
they exist, to the token.
groups
insert, append
Copies all the additional
identifiers to the token.
(The additional identifiers
Identity management
128
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
Option
Operator
Description
-
-
-
exclude the primary UID,
the primary GID, the
primary user SID, and the
primary group SID.)
default_user
all operators except remove groups
If the mapping service
fails to find the second
user in a rule, the service
tries to find the username
of the default user. The
name of the default user
cannot include wildcards.
When you set the option
for the default user in a
rule with the command-
line interface, you must
set it with an underscore:
default_user.
break
all operators
Stops the mapping service
from applying rules that
follow the insertion point
of the break option. The
mapping service
generates the final token
at the point of the break.
User-mapping best practices
You can follow best practices to simplify user mapping.
Best practice
Comments
-
-
Use Active Directory with
RFC 2307 and Windows
Services for UNIX
Use Microsoft Active Directory with Windows Services for UNIX and
RFC 2307 attributes to manage Linux, UNIX, and Windows systems.
Integrating UNIX and Linux systems with Active Directory centralizes
identity management and eases interoperability, reducing the need
for user mapping rules. Make sure your domain controllers are
running Windows Server 2003 or later.
Employ a consistent
username strategy
The simplest configurations name users consistently, so that each
UNIX user corresponds to a similarly named Windows user. Such a
convention allows rules with wildcards to match names and map
them without explicitly specifying each pair of accounts.
Do not use overlapping ID
ranges
In networks with multiple identity sources, such as LDAP and Active
Directory with RFC 2307 attributes, you should ensure that UID and
GID ranges do not overlap. It is also important that the range from
which OneFS automatically allocates UIDs and GIDs does not overlap
with any other ID range. The range from which OneFS automatically
allocates a UID and GID is 1,000,000 to 2,000,000. If UIDs and GIDs
overlap across two or more directory services, some users might gain
access to other users’ directories and files.
Identity management
User mapping across systems and identities
129
Best practice
Comments
-
-
Avoid common UIDs and
GIDs
You should not use well-known UIDs and GIDs in your ID ranges
because they are reserved for system accounts. UIDs and GIDs below
1000 are reserved for system accounts; do not assign them to users
or groups.
Do not use user principal
names in mapping rules
You cannot use a user principal name(UPN) in a user mapping rule. A
user principal name is an Active Directory domain and username that
are combined into an Internet-style name with an @ symbol, like an
email address: jane@example.com. If you include a UPN in a rule,
the mapping service ignores it and may return an error.
Group rules by type and
order them
The system processes every mapping rule by default, which can
present problems when you apply a rule to deny all unknown users
access. In addition, replacement rules may interact with rules that
contain wildcard characters. To minimize complexity, it is
recommended that you group rules by type and organize them in the
following order:
1. Place the rules that replace an identity first to ensure that OneFS
replaces all instances of the identity.
2. Set join, add, and insert rules second.
3. Set rules that allow or deny access last.
4. Within each group of rules, put explicit rules before rules with
wildcards; otherwise, the explicit rules might be skipped.
Add the LDAP or NIS
primary group to the
supplemental groups
When an Isilon cluster is connected to Active Directory and LDAP, a
best practice is to add the LDAP primary group to the list of
supplemental groups. This lets OneFS honor group permissions on
files created over NFS or migrated from other UNIX storage systems.
The same practice is advised when an Isilon cluster is connected to
both Active Directory and NIS.
On-disk identity
After the user mapper resolves a user's identities, OneFS determines an authoritative
identifier for it, which is the preferred on-disk identity.
OnesFS stores either UNIX or Windows identities in file metadata on disk. On-disk identity
types are UNIX, SID, and native. Identities are set when a file is created or a file's access
control data is modified. Almost all protocols require some level of mapping to operate
correctly, so choosing the preferred identity to store on disk is important. You can
configure OneFS to store either the UNIX or the Windows identity, or you can allow OneFS
to determine the optimal identity to store.
On-disk identity types are UNIX, SID, and native. Although you can change the type of on-
disk identity, the native identity is best for a network with UNIX and Windows systems. In
native mode, setting the UID as the on-disk identity improves NFS performance.
Note
When you upgrade from a version of OneFS that is older than 7.0, the on-disk identity is
set to UNIX. The SID on-disk identity is for a homogeneous network of Windows systems
managed only with Active Directory. On new installations, the on-disk identity is set to
native.
Identity management
130
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested