mvc pdf viewer free : Convert multiple pdf to jpg online SDK software API .net wpf windows sharepoint docu502202-part261

Internal and external networks
A cluster includes two networks: an internal network to exchange data between nodes
and an external network to handle client connections.
Nodes exchange data through the internal network with a proprietary, unicast protocol
over InfiniBand. Each node includes redundant InfiniBand ports so you can add a second
internal network in case the first one fails.
Clients reach the cluster with 1 GigE or 10 GigE Ethernet. Since every node includes
Ethernet ports, the cluster's bandwidth scales with performance and capacity as you add
nodes.
Isilon cluster
An Isilon cluster consists of three or more hardware nodes, up to 144. Each node runs the
Isilon OneFS operating system, the distributed file-system software that unites the nodes
into a cluster. A cluster’s storage capacity ranges from a minimum of 18 TB to a maximum
of 15.5 PB.
Cluster administration
OneFS centralizes cluster management through a web administration interface and a
command-line interface. Both interfaces provide methods to activate licenses, check the
status of nodes, configure the cluster, upgrade the system, generate alerts, view client
connections, track performance, and change various settings.
In addition, OneFS simplifies administration by automating maintenance with a job
engine. You can schedule jobs that scan for viruses, inspect disks for errors, reclaim disk
space, and check the integrity of the file system. The engine manages the jobs to
minimize impact on the cluster's performance.
With SNMP versions 1, 2c, and 3, you can remotely monitor hardware components, CPU
usage, switches, and network interfaces. EMC Isilon supplies management information
bases (MIBs) and traps for the OneFS operating system.
OneFS also includes a RESTful application programming interface—known as the Platform
API—to automate access, configuration, and monitoring. For example, you can retrieve
performance statistics, provision users, and tap the file system. The Platform API
integrates with OneFS role-based access control to increase security. See the Isilon
Platform API Reference.
Quorum
An Isilon cluster must have a quorum to work properly. A quorum prevents data conflicts
—for example, conflicting versions of the same file—in case two groups of nodes become
unsynchronized. If a cluster loses its quorum for read and write requests, you cannot
access the OneFS file system.
For a quorum, more than half the nodes must be available over the internal network. A
seven-node cluster, for example, requires a four-node quorum. A 10-node cluster requires
a six-node quorum. If a node is unreachable over the internal network, OneFS separates
the node from the cluster, an action referred to as splitting. After a cluster is split, cluster
operations continue as long as enough nodes remain connected to have a quorum.
In a split cluster, the nodes that remain in the cluster are referred to as the majority
group. Nodes that are split from the cluster are referred to as the minority group.
Isilon scale-out NAS
Internal and external networks
21
Convert multiple pdf to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; convert pdf to jpg for
Convert multiple pdf to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
batch pdf to jpg converter; convert multipage pdf to jpg
When split nodes can reconnect with the cluster and resynchronize with the other nodes,
the nodes rejoin the cluster's majority group, an action referred to as merging.
A OneFS cluster contains two quorum properties:
u
read quorum (efs.gmp.has_quorum)
u
write quorum (efs.gmp.has_super_block_quorum)
By connecting to a node with SSH and running the sysctl command-line tool as root,
you can view the status of both types of quorum. Here is an example for a cluster that has
a quorum for both read and write operations, as the command's output indicates with a
1, for true:
sysctl efs.gmp.has_quorum
efs.gmp.has_quorum: 1 
sysctl efs.gmp.has_super_block_quorum
efs.gmp.has_super_block_quorum: 1
The degraded states of nodes—such as smartfail, read-only, offline, and so on—affect
quorum in different ways. A node in a smartfail or read-only state affects only write
quorum. A node in an offline state, however, affects both read and write quorum. In a
cluster, the combination of nodes in different degraded states determines whether read
requests, write requests, or both work.
A cluster can lose write quorum but keep read quorum. Consider a four-node cluster in
which nodes 1 and 2 are working normally. Node 3 is in a read-only state, and node 4 is
in a smartfail state. In such a case, read requests to the cluster succeed. Write requests,
however, receive an input-output error because the states of nodes 3 and 4 break the
write quorum.
A cluster can also lose both its read and write quorum. If nodes 3 and 4 in a four-node
cluster are in an offline state, both write requests and read requests receive an input-
output error, and you cannot access the file system. When OneFS can reconnect with the
nodes, OneFS merges them back into the cluster. Unlike a RAID system, an Isilon node
can rejoin the cluster without being rebuilt and reconfigured.
Splitting and merging
Splitting and merging optimize the use of nodes without your intervention.
OneFS monitors every node in a cluster. If a node is unreachable over the internal
network, OneFS separates the node from the cluster, an action referred to as splitting.
When the cluster can reconnect to the node, OneFS adds the node back into the cluster,
an action referred to as merging.
When a node is split from a cluster, it will continue to capture event information locally.
You can connect to a split node with SSH and run the isi events list command to
view the local event log for the node. The local event log can help you troubleshoot the
connection issue that resulted in the split. When the split node rejoins the cluster, local
events gathered during the split are deleted. You can still view events generated by a
split node in the node's event log file located at /var/log/
isi_celog_events.log.
If a cluster splits during a write operation, OneFS might need to re-allocate blocks for the
file on the side with the quorum, which leads allocated blocks on the side without a
quorum to become orphans. When the split nodes reconnect with the cluster, the OneFS
Collect system job reclaims the orphaned blocks.
Meanwhile, as nodes split and merge with the cluster, the OneFS AutoBalance job
redistributes data evenly among the nodes in the cluster, optimizing protection and
conserving space.
Isilon scale-out NAS
22
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
pdf to jpg; best convert pdf to jpg
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
change pdf to jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg
Storage pools
Storage pools segment nodes and files into logical divisions to simplify the management
and storage of data.
A storage pool comprises node pools and tiers. Node pools group equivalent nodes to
protect data and ensure reliability. Tiers combine node pools to optimize storage by
need, such as a frequently used high-speed tier or a rarely accessed archive.
The SmartPools module groups nodes and files into pools. If you do not activate a
SmartPools license, the module provisions node pools and creates one file pool. If you
activate the SmartPools license, you receive more features. You can, for example, create
multiple file pools and govern them with policies. The policies move files, directories, and
file pools among node pools or tiers. You can also define how OneFS handles write
operations when a node pool or tier is full. SmartPools reserves a virtual hot spare to
reprotect data if a drive fails regardless of whether the SmartPools license is activated.
IP address pools
Within a subnet, you can partition a cluster's external network interfaces into pools of IP
address ranges. The pools empower you to customize your storage network to serve
different groups of users. Although you must initially configure the default external IP
subnet in IPv4 format, you can configure additional subnets in IPv4 or IPv6.
You can associate IP address pools with a node, a group of nodes, or NIC ports. For
example, you can set up one subnet for storage nodes and another subnet for accelerator
nodes. Similarly, you can allocate ranges of IP addresses on a subnet to different teams,
such as engineering and sales. Such options help you create a storage topology that
matches the demands of your network.
In addition, network provisioning rules streamline the setup of external connections.
After you configure the rules with network settings, you can apply the settings to new
nodes.
As a standard feature, the OneFS SmartConnect module balances connections among
nodes by using a round-robin policy with static IP addresses and one IP address pool for
each subnet. Activating a SmartConnect Advanced license adds features, such as
defining IP address pools to support multiple DNS zones.
The OneFS operating system
A distributed operating system based on FreeBSD, OneFS presents an Isilon cluster's file
system as a single share or export with a central point of administration.
The OneFS operating system does the following:
u
Supports common data-access protocols, such as SMB and NFS.
u
Connects to multiple identity management systems, such as Active Directory and
LDAP.
u
Authenticates users and groups.
u
Controls access to directories and files.
Isilon scale-out NAS
Storage pools
23
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif Append one PDF file to the end of another one in
convert pdf image to jpg online; convert pdf into jpg
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET framework. Combine scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp
changing pdf to jpg on; convert pdf pages to jpg
Data-access protocols
With the OneFS operating system, you can access data with multiple file-sharing and
transfer protocols. As a result, Microsoft Windows, UNIX, Linux, and Mac OS X clients can
share the same directories and files.
OneFS supports the following protocols.
Protocol
Description
-
-
SMB
Server Message Block gives Windows users access to the cluster. OneFS works with
SMB 1, SMB 2, and SMB 2.1. With SMB 2.1, OneFS supports client opportunity locks
(oplocks) and large (1 MB) MTU sizes. The default file share is /ifs.
NFS
The Network File System enables UNIX, Linux, and Mac OS X systems to remotely
mount any subdirectory, including subdirectories created by Windows users. OneFS
works with versions 2 through 4 of the Network File System protocol (NFSv2, NFSv3,
NFSv4). The default export is /ifs.
FTP
File Transfer Protocol lets systems with an FTP client connect to the cluster to exchange
files.
iSCSI
The Internet Small Computer System Interface protocol provides access to block
storage. iSCSI integration requires you to activate a separate license.
HDFS
The Hadoop Distributed File System protocol makes it possible for a cluster to work
with Apache Hadoop, a framework for data-intensive distributed applications. HDFS
integration requires you to activate a separate license.
HTTP
Hyper Text Transfer protocol gives systems browser-based access to resources. OneFS
includes limited support for WebDAV.
Identity management and access control
OneFS works with multiple identity management systems to authenticate users and
control access to files. In addition, OneFS features access zones that allow users from
different directory services to access different resources based on their IP address. Role-
based access control, meanwhile, segments administrative access by role.
OneFS authenticates users with the following identity management systems:
u
Microsoft Active Directory (AD)
u
Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP)
u
Network Information Service (NIS)
u
Local users and local groups
u
A file provider for accounts in /etc/spwd.db and /etc/group files. With the file
provider, you can add an authoritative third-party source of user and group
information.
You can manage users with different identity management systems; OneFS maps the
accounts so that Windows and UNIX identities can coexist. A Windows user account
managed in Active Directory, for example, is mapped to a corresponding UNIX account in
NIS or LDAP.
To control access, an Isilon cluster works with both the access control lists (ACLs) of
Windows systems and the POSIX mode bits of UNIX systems. When OneFS must
Isilon scale-out NAS
24
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
An advanced .NET control able to batch convert PDF documents to image formats in C#.NET. Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png
convert from pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
convert pdf file to jpg format; batch convert pdf to jpg
transform a file's permissions from ACLs to mode bits or from mode bits to ACLs, OneFS
merges the permissions to maintain consistent security settings.
OneFS presents protocol-specific views of permissions so that NFS exports display mode
bits and SMB shares show ACLs. You can, however, manage not only mode bits but also
ACLs with standard UNIX tools, such as the chmod and chown commands. In addition,
ACL policies enable you to configure how OneFS manages permissions for networks that
mix Windows and UNIX systems.
Access zones
OneFS includes an access zones feature. Access zones allow users from different
authentication providers, such as two untrusted Active Directory domains, to access
different OneFS resources based on an incoming IP address. An access zone can
contain multiple authentication providers and SMB namespaces.
RBAC for administration
OneFS includes role-based access control (RBAC) for administration. In place of a
root or administrator account, RBAC lets you manage administrative access by role.
A role limits privileges to an area of administration. For example, you can create
separate administrator roles for security, auditing, storage, and backup.
Structure of the file system
OneFS presents all the nodes in a cluster as a global namespace—that is, as the default
file share, /ifs.
In the file system, directories are inode number links. An inode contains file metadata
and an inode number, which identifies a file's location. OneFS dynamically allocates
inodes, and there is no limit on the number of inodes.
To distribute data among nodes, OneFS sends messages with a globally routable block
address through the cluster's internal network. The block address identifies the node and
the drive storing the block of data.
Note
It is recommended that you do not save data to the root /ifs file path but in directories
below /ifs. The design of your data storage structure should be planned carefully. A
well-designed directory optimizes cluster performance and cluster administration.
Data layout
OneFS evenly distributes data among a cluster's nodes with layout algorithms that
maximize storage efficiency and performance. The system continuously reallocates data
to conserve space.
OneFS breaks data down into smaller sections called blocks, and then the system places
the blocks in a stripe unit. By referencing either file data or erasure codes, a stripe unit
helps safeguard a file from a hardware failure. The size of a stripe unit depends on the
file size, the number of nodes, and the protection setting. After OneFS divides the data
into stripe units, OneFS allocates, or stripes, the stripe units across nodes in the cluster.
When a client connects to a node, the client's read and write operations take place on
multiple nodes. For example, when a client connects to a node and requests a file, the
node retrieves the data from multiple nodes and rebuilds the file. You can optimize how
OneFS lays out data to match your dominant access pattern—concurrent, streaming, or
random.
Isilon scale-out NAS
Structure of the file system
25
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
control for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif And the PDF document can contain one empty page or multiple empty pages.
change pdf to jpg format; convert pdf to jpg batch
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word control for creating PDF from multiple image formats such Load PDF from stream programmatically in VB.NET.
c# convert pdf to jpg; reader convert pdf to jpg
Writing files
On a node, the input-output operations of the OneFS software stack split into two
functional layers: A top layer, or initiator, and a bottom layer, or participant. In read and
write operations, the initiator and the participant play different roles.
When a client writes a file to a node, the initiator on the node manages the layout of the
file on the cluster. First, the initiator divides the file into blocks of 8 KB each. Second, the
initiator places the blocks in one or more stripe units. At 128 KB, a stripe unit consists of
16 blocks. Third, the initiator spreads the stripe units across the cluster until they span a
width of the cluster, creating a stripe. The width of the stripe depends on the number of
nodes and the protection setting.
After dividing a file into stripe units, the initiator writes the data first to non-volatile
random-access memory (NVRAM) and then to disk. NVRAM retains the information when
the power is off.
During the write transaction, NVRAM guards against failed nodes with journaling. If a
node fails mid-transaction, the transaction restarts without the failed node. When the
node returns, it replays the journal from NVRAM to finish the transaction. The node also
runs the AutoBalance job to check the file's on-disk striping. Meanwhile, uncommitted
writes waiting in the cache are protected with mirroring. As a result, OneFS eliminates
multiple points of failure.
Reading files
In a read operation, a node acts as a manager to gather data from the other nodes and
present it to the requesting client.
Because an Isilon cluster's coherent cache spans all the nodes, OneFS can store different
data in each node's RAM. By using the internal InfiniBand network, a node can retrieve
file data from another node's cache faster than from its own local disk. If a read operation
requests data that is cached on any node, OneFS pulls the cached data to serve it
quickly.
In addition, for files with an access pattern of concurrent or streaming, OneFS pre-fetches
in-demand data into a managing node's local cache to further improve sequential-read
performance.
Metadata layout
OneFS protects metadata by spreading it across nodes and drives.
Metadata—which includes information about where a file is stored, how it is protected,
and who can access it—is stored in inodes and protected with locks in a B+ tree, a
standard structure for organizing data blocks in a file system to provide instant lookups.
OneFS replicates file metadata across the cluster so that there is no single point of
failure.
Working together as peers, all the nodes help manage metadata access and locking. If a
node detects an error in metadata, the node looks up the metadata in an alternate
location and then corrects the error.
Isilon scale-out NAS
26
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
Locks and concurrency
OneFS includes a distributed lock manager that orchestrates locks on data across all the
nodes in a cluster.
The lock manager grants locks for the file system, byte ranges, and protocols, including
SMB share-mode locks and NFS advisory locks. OneFS also supports SMB opportunistic
locks and NFSv4 delegations.
Because OneFS distributes the lock manager across all the nodes, any node can act as a
lock coordinator. When a thread from a node requests a lock, the lock manager's hashing
algorithm typically assigns the coordinator role to a different node. The coordinator
allocates a shared lock or an exclusive lock, depending on the type of request. A shared
lock allows users to share a file simultaneously, typically for read operations. An
exclusive lock allows only one user to access a file, typically for write operations.
Striping
In a process known as striping, OneFS segments files into units of data and then
distributes the units across nodes in a cluster. Striping protects your data and improves
cluster performance.
To distribute a file, OneFS reduces it to blocks of data, arranges the blocks into stripe
units, and then allocates the stripe units to nodes over the internal network.
At the same time, OneFS distributes erasure codes that protect the file. The erasure codes
encode the file's data in a distributed set of symbols, adding space-efficient redundancy.
With only a part of the symbol set, OneFS can recover the original file data.
Taken together, the data and its redundancy form a protection group for a region of file
data. OneFS places the protection groups on different drives on different nodes—creating
data stripes.
Because OneFS stripes data across nodes that work together as peers, a user connecting
to any node can take advantage of the entire cluster's performance.
By default, OneFS optimizes striping for concurrent access. If your dominant access
pattern is streaming--that is, lower concurrency, higher single-stream workloads, such as
with video--you can change how OneFS lays out data to increase sequential-read
performance. To better handle streaming access, OneFS stripes data across more drives.
Streaming is most effective on clusters or subpools serving large files.
Data protection overview
An Isilon cluster is designed to serve data even when components fail. By default, OneFS
protects data with erasure codes, enabling you to retrieve files when a node or disk fails.
As an alternative to erasure codes, you can protect data with two to eight mirrors.
When you create a cluster with five or more nodes, erasure codes deliver as much as 80
percent efficiency. On larger clusters, erasure codes provide as much as four levels of
redundancy.
In addition to erasure codes and mirroring, OneFS includes the following features to help
protect the integrity, availability, and confidentiality of data:
Feature
Description
-
-
Antivirus
OneFS can send files to servers running the Internet Content Adaptation
Protocol (ICAP) to scan for viruses and other threats.
Isilon scale-out NAS
Locks and concurrency
27
Feature
Description
-
-
Clones
OneFS enables you to create clones that share blocks with other files to save
space.
NDMP backup and
restore
OneFS can back up data to tape and other devices through the Network Data
Management Protocol. Although OneFS supports both NDMP 3-way and 2-
way backup, 2-way backup requires an Isilon Backup Accelerator node.
Protection
domains
You can apply protection domains to files and directories to prevent
changes.
The following software modules also help protect data, but they require you to activate a
separate license:
Licensed
Feature
Description
-
-
SyncIQ
SyncIQ replicates data on another Isilon cluster and automates failover and
failback operations between clusters. If a cluster becomes unusable, you can
fail over to another Isilon cluster.
SnapshotIQ
You can protect data with a snapshot—a logical copy of data stored on a
cluster.
SmartLock
The SmartLock tool prevents users from modifying and deleting files. You can
commit files to a write-once, read-many state: The file can never be modified
and cannot be deleted until after a set retention period. SmartLock can help
you comply with Securities and Exchange Commission Rule 17a-4.
N+M data protection
OneFS supports N+M erasure code levels of N+1, N+2, N+3, and N+4.
In the N+M data model, N represents the number of nodes, and M represents the number
of simultaneous failures of nodes or drives that the cluster can handle without losing
data. For example, with N+2 the cluster can lose two drives on different nodes or lose two
nodes.
To protect drives and nodes separately, OneFS also supports N+M:B. In the N+M:B
notation, M is the number of disk failures, and B is the number of node failures. With N
+3:1 protection, for example, the cluster can lose three drives or one node without losing
data.
The default protection level for clusters larger than 18 TB is N+2:1. The default for
clusters smaller than 18 TB is N+1.
The quorum rule dictates the number of nodes required to support a protection level. For
example, N+3 requires at least seven nodes so you can maintain a quorum if three nodes
fail.
You can, however, set a protection level that is higher than the cluster can support. In a
four-node cluster, for example, you can set the protection level at 5x. OneFS protects the
data at 4x until a fifth node is added, after which OneFS automatically reprotects the data
at 5x.
Isilon scale-out NAS
28
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
Data mirroring
You can protect on-disk data with mirroring, which copies data to multiple locations.
OneFS supports two to eight mirrors. You can use mirroring instead of erasure codes, or
you can combine erasure codes with mirroring.
Mirroring, however, consumes more space than erasure codes. Mirroring data three
times, for example, duplicates the data three times, which requires more space than
erasure codes. As a result, mirroring suits transactions that require high performance,
such as with iSCSI LUNs.
You can also mix erasure codes with mirroring. During a write operation, OneFS divides
data into redundant protection groups. For files protected by erasure codes, a protection
group consists of data blocks and their erasure codes. For mirrored files, a protection
group contains all the mirrors of a set of blocks. OneFS can switch the type of protection
group as it writes a file to disk. By changing the protection group dynamically, OneFS can
continue writing data despite a node failure that prevents the cluster from applying
erasure codes. After the node is restored, OneFS automatically converts the mirrored
protection groups to erasure codes.
The file system journal
A journal, which records file-system changes in a battery-backed NVRAM card, recovers
the file system after failures, such as a power loss. When a node restarts, the journal
replays file transactions to restore the file system.
Virtual hot spare
When a drive fails, OneFS uses space reserved in a subpool instead of a hot spare drive.
The reserved space is known as a virtual hot spare.
In contrast to a spare drive, a virtual hot spare automatically resolves drive failures and
continues writing data. If a drive fails, OneFS migrates data to the virtual hot spare to
reprotect it. You can reserve as many as four disk drives as a virtual hot spare.
Balancing protection with storage space
You can set protection levels to balance protection requirements with storage space.
Higher protection levels typically consume more space than lower levels because you
lose an amount of disk space to storing erasure codes. The overhead for the erasure
codes depends on the protection level, the file size, and the number of nodes in the
cluster. Since OneFS stripes both data and erasure codes across nodes, the overhead
declines as you add nodes.
VMware integration
OneFS integrates with several VMware products, including vSphere, vCenter, and ESXi.
For example, OneFS works with the VMware vSphere API for Storage Awareness (VASA) so
that you can view information about an Isilon cluster in vSphere. OneFS also works with
the VMware vSphere API for Array Integration (VAAI) to support the following features for
block storage: hardware-assisted locking, full copy, and block zeroing. VAAI for NFS
requires an ESXi plug-in.
With the Isilon for vCenter plug-in, you can backup and restore virtual machines on an
Isilon cluster. With the Isilon Storage Replication Adapter, OneFS integrates with the
Isilon scale-out NAS
Data mirroring
29
VMware vCenter Site Recovery Manager to recover virtual machines that are replicated
between Isilon clusters.
The iSCSI option
Block-based storage offers flexible storage and access. OneFS enables clients to store
block data on an Isilon cluster by using the Internet Small Computer System Interface
(iSCSI) protocol. With the iSCSI module, you can configure block storage for Windows,
Linux, and VMware systems.
On the network side, the logical network interface (LNI) framework dynamically manages
interfaces for network resilience. You can combine multiple network interfaces with LACP
and LAGG to aggregate bandwidth and to fail over client sessions. The iSCSI module
requires you to activate a separate license.
Software modules
You can access advanced features by activating licenses for EMC Isilon software
modules.
SmartLock
SmartLock protects critical data from malicious, accidental, or premature alteration
or deletion to help you comply with SEC 17a-4 regulations. You can automatically
commit data to a tamper-proof state and then retain it with a compliance clock.
SyncIQ automated failover and failback
SyncIQ replicates data on another Isilon cluster and automates failover and failback
between clusters. If a cluster becomes unusable, you can fail over to another Isilon
cluster. Failback restores the original source data after the primary cluster becomes
available again.
File clones
OneFS provides provisioning of full read/write copies of files, LUNs, and other
clones. OneFS also provides virtual machine linked cloning through VMware API
integration.
SnapshotIQ
SnapshotIQ protects data with a snapshot—a logical copy of data stored on a
cluster. A snapshot can be restored to its top-level directory.
SmartPools
SmartPools enable you to create multiple file pools governed by file-pool policies.
The policies move files and directories among node pools or tiers. You can also
define how OneFS handles write operations when a node pool or tier is full.
SmartConnect
If you activate a SmartConnect Advanced license, you can balance policies to evenly
distribute CPU usage, client connections, or throughput. You can also define IP
address pools to support multiple DNS zones in a subnet. In addition, SmartConnect
supports IP failover, also known as NFS failover.
InsightIQ
The InsightIQ virtual appliance monitors and analyzes the performance of your Isilon
cluster to help you optimize storage resources and forecast capacity.
Isilon scale-out NAS
30
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested