u
NT-Hash
u
SHA-256
u
SHA-512
Note
The built-in System file provider includes services to list, manage, and authenticate
against system accounts such as root, admin, and nobody. It is recommended that you
do not modify the System file provider.
Local provider
The local provider provides authentication and lookup facilities for user accounts that
were added by an administrator.
Local authentication can be useful when Active Directory, LDAP, or NIS directory services
are not used, or when a specific user or application needs to access the cluster. Local
groups can include built-in groups and Active Directory groups as members.
In addition to configuring network-based authentication sources, you can also manage
local users and groups by configuring a local password policy for each node in the
cluster. OneFS settings specify password complexity, password age and re-use, and
password-attempt lockout policies.
Managing access permissions
The internal representation of identities and permissions can contain information from
UNIX sources, Windows sources, or both. Because access protocols can process the
information from only one of these sources, the system may need to make
approximations to present the information in a format the protocol can process.
Configure access management settings
Default access settings include whether to send NTLMv2 responses for SMB connections;
the identity type to store on disk; the Windows workgroup name to use when running in
local mode; and character substitution for spaces encountered in user and group names.
Procedure
1. Click Cluster Management
Access Management
Settings.
2. Configure the following settings as needed.
Send NTLMv2
Configures the type of NTLM response that is sent to an SMB client.
On-Disk Identity
Controls the preferred identity to store on disk. If OneFS is unable to convert an
identity to the preferred format, it is stored as is. This setting does not affect
identities that are currently stored on disk. Select one of the following settings:
l
native: Let OneFS determine the identity to store on disk. This is the
recommended setting.
l
unix: Always store incoming UNIX identifiers (UIDs and GIDs) on disk.
l
sid: Store incoming Windows security identifiers (SIDs) on disk, unless the
SID was generated from a UNIX identifier; in that case, convert it back to the
UNIX identifier and store it on disk.
Authentication and access control
Local provider
91
.Pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
bulk pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg online
.Pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
bulk pdf to jpg converter online; convert pdf into jpg
Workgroup
Specifies the NetBIOS workgroup. The default value is WORKGROUP.
Space Replacement
For clients that have difficulty parsing spaces in user and group names, specifies
a substitute character.
3. Click Save.
After you finish
If you changed the on-disk identity selection, it is recommended that you run the Repair
Permissions job with the 'Convert permissions' repair task to prevent potential
permissions errors.
Modify ACL policy settings
You can modify ACL policy settings but the default ACL policy settings are sufficient for
most cluster deployments.
CAUTION
Because ACL policies change the behavior of permissions throughout the system, they
should be modified only as necessary by experienced administrators with advanced
knowledge of Windows ACLs. This is especially true for the advanced settings, which are
applied regardless of the cluster's environment.
For UNIX, Windows, or balanced environments, the optimal permission policy settings are
selected and cannot be modified. However, you can choose to manually configure the
cluster's default permission settings if necessary to support your particular environment.
Note
You must be logged in to the web administration interface to perform this task.
For a description of each setting option, see ACL policy settings options.
Procedure
1. Click Protocols
ACLs
ACL Policies.
2. In the Standard Settings section, under Environment, click to select the setting that
best describes your environment, or select Configure permission policies manually to
configure individual permission policies.
3. If you selected the Configure permission policies manually option, configure the
settings as needed.
For more information about these settings, see ACL policy settings options.
4. In the Advanced Settings section, configure the settings as needed.
ACL policy settings options
You can configure an ACL policy by choosing from these settings options.
Setting
Description
-
-
UNIX only
Causes cluster permissions to operate with UNIX semantics, as opposed to
Windows semantics. Enabling this option prevents ACL creation on the system.
Authentication and access control
92
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour.
change pdf to jpg file; convert pdf file to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Web Security. Your PDF and JPG files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
advanced pdf to jpg converter; reader pdf to jpeg
Setting
Description
-
-
Balanced
Causes cluster permissions to operate in a mixed UNIX and Windows
environment. This setting is recommended for most cluster deployments.
Windows only Causes cluster permissions to operate with Windows semantics, as opposed to
UNIX semantics. Enabling this option causes the system to return an error on
UNIX chmod requests.
Configure
permission
policies
manually
Allows you to configure the individual permissions policy settings available
under 
Permission Policies
.
ACL creation
over SMB
Specifies whether to allow or deny creation of ACLs over SMB. Select one of the
following options.
l
Do not allow the creation of ACLs over Windows File Sharing
(SMB)
: Prevents ACL creation on the cluster.
l
Allow the creation of ACLs over SMB
: Allows ACL creation on the
cluster.
Note
Inheritable ACLs on the system take precedence over this setting: If inheritable
ACLs are set on a folder, any new files and folders created in that folder will
inherit the folder's ACL. Disabling this setting does not remove ACLs currently
set on files. If you want to clear an existing ACL, run the chmod -b 
<mode>
<file>
command to remove the ACL and set the correct permissions.
chmod on files
with existing
ACLs
Controls what happens when a chmod operation is initiated on a file with an
ACL, either locally or over NFS. This setting controls any elements that set UNIX
permissions, including File System Explorer. Enabling this policy setting does
not change how chmod operations affect files that do not have ACLs. Select
one of the following options.
l
Remove the existing ACL and set UNIX permissions instead
: For
chmod operations, removes any existing ACL and instead sets the chmod
permissions. Select this option only if you do not need permissions to be
set from Windows.
l
Remove the existing ACL and create an ACL equivalent to the UNIX
permissions
: Stores the UNIX permissions in a Windows ACL. Select this
option only if you want to remove Windows permissions but do not want
files to have synthetic ACLs.
l
Remove the existing ACL and create an ACL equivalent to the UNIX
permissions, for all users/groups referenced in old ACL
: Stores the
UNIX permissions in a Windows ACL. Select this option only if you want to
remove Windows permissions but do not want files to have synthetic ACLs.
l
Merge the new permissions with the existing ACL
: Causes Windows
and UNIX permissions to operate smoothly in a balanced environment by
merging permissions that are applied by chmod with existing ACLs. An
ACE for each identity (owner, group, and everyone) is either modified or
created, but all other ACEs are unmodified. Inheritable ACEs are also left
unmodified to enable Windows users to continue to inherit appropriate
Authentication and access control
ACL policy settings options
93
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
convert pdf file into jpg; convert pdf to jpeg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
convert pdf to jpg c#; to jpeg
Setting
Description
-
-
permissions. However, UNIX users can set specific permissions for each of
those three standard identities.
l
Deny permission to modify the ACL
: Prevents users from making NFS
and local chmod operations. Enable this setting if you do not want to allow
permission sets over NFS. This setting returns an error when an NFS client
attempts to modify the ACL.
l
Ignore operation if file has an existing ACL
: Prevents an NFS client
from making changes to the ACL. This setting does not return an error
when a NFS client attempts to modify the ACL. Select this option if you
defined an inheritable ACL on a directory and want to use that ACL for
permissions.
CAUTION
If you try to run the chmod command on the same permissions that are
currently set on a file with an ACL, you may cause the operation to silently fail
—The operation appears to be successful, but if you were to examine the
permissions on the cluster, you would notice that the chmod command had
no effect. As a workaround, you can run the chmod command away from the
current permissions and then perform a second chmod command to revert to
the original permissions. For example, if your file shows 755 UNIX
permissions and you want to confirm this number, you could run chmod 700
file; chmod 755 file
ACLs created
on directories
by UNIX
chmod
On Windows systems, the access control entries for directories can define fine-
grained rules for inheritance; on UNIX, the mode bits are not inherited. Making
ACLs that are created on directories by the chmod command inheritable is
more secure for tightly controlled environments but may deny access to some
Windows users who would otherwise expect access.
Select one of the following options.
l
Make them inheritable
l
Do not make them inheritable
chown on files
with existing
ACLs
Changes a file or folder's owning user or group. Select one of the following
options.
l
Modify the owner and/or group permissions
: Causes the chown
operation to perform as it does in UNIX. Enabling this setting modifies any
ACEs in the ACL associated with the old and new owner or group.
l
Do not modify the ACL
: Cause the NFS chown operation to function as it
does in Windows. When a file owner is changed over Windows, no
permissions in the ACL are changed.
Authentication and access control
94
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
similar software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
convert pdf file to jpg on; batch pdf to jpg online
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Image Converter Pro - JPEG to JBIG2 Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from JBIG2 Images on Windows.
convert pdf images to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter for
Setting
Description
-
-
Note
Over NFS, the chown operation changes the permissions and the owner or
owning group. For example, consider a file owned by user Joe with "rwx------"
(700) permissions, signifying "rwx" permissions for the owner, but no
permissions for anyone else. If you run the chown command to change
ownership of the file to user Bob, the owner permissions are still "rwx" but they
now represent the permissions for Bob, rather than for Joe. In fact, Joe will have
lost all of his permissions. This setting does not affect UNIX chown operations
performed on files with UNIX permissions, and it does not affect Windows
chown operations, which do not change any permissions.
Access checks
(chmod,
chown)
In UNIX environments, only the file owner or superuser has the right to run a
chmod or chown operation on a file. In Windows environments, you can
implement this policy setting to give users the right to perform chmod
operations, called the "change permissions" right, or the right to perform
chown operations, called the "take ownership" right.
Note
The "take ownership" right only gives users the ability to take file ownership,
not to give ownership away.
Select one of the following options.
l
Allow only owners to chmod or chown
: Causes chmod and chown
access checks to operate with UNIX-like behavior.
l
Allow owner and users with 'take ownership' right to chown, and
owner and users with 'change permissions' right to chmod
: Causes
chmod and chown access checks to operate with Windows-like behavior.
Treatment of
"rwx"
permissions
In UNIX environments, "rwx" permissions signify two things: A user or group
has read, write, and execute permissions; and a user or group has the
maximum possible level of permissions.
When you assign UNIX permissions to a file, no ACLs are stored for that file.
However, a Windows system processes only ACLs; Windows does not process
UNIX permissions. Therefore, when you view a file's permissions on a Windows
system, the cluster must translate the UNIX permissions into an ACL. This type
of ACL is called a synthetic ACL. Synthetic ACLs are not stored anywhere;
instead, they are dynamically generated as needed and then they are
discarded. If a file has UNIX permissions, you may notice synthetic ACLs when
you run the ls file command on the cluster in order to view a file’s ACLs.
When you generate a synthetic ACL, the cluster maps UNIX permissions to
Windows rights. Windows supports a more granular permissions model than
UNIX does, and it specifies rights that cannot easily be mapped from UNIX
permissions. If the cluster maps "rwx" permissions to Windows rights, you
must enable one of the following options. The main difference between "rwx"
and "Full Control" is the broader set of permissions with "Full Control".
Select one of the following options.
l
Retain 'rwx' permissions
: Generates an ACE that provides only read,
write, and execute permissions.
Authentication and access control
ACL policy settings options
95
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from GIF Images on Windows. JPEG to GIF Converter can directly convert GIF files to JPG files.
convert pdf to jpg; change file from pdf to jpg
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Image Converter Pro - JPEG to DICOM Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from DICOM Images on Windows.
best program to convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg on
Setting
Description
-
-
l
Treat 'rwx' permissions as Full Control
: Generates an ACE that
provides the maximum Windows permissions for a user or a group by
adding the "change permissions" right, the "take ownership" right, and the
"delete" right.
Group owner
inheritance
Operating systems tend to work with group ownership and permissions in two
different ways: BSD inherits the group owner from the file's parent folder;
Windows and Linux inherit the group owner from the file creator's primary
group. If you enable a setting that causes the group owner to be inherited from
the creator's primary group, it can be overridden on a per-folder basis by
running the chmod command to set the set-gid bit. This inheritance applies
only when the file is created. For more information, see the manual page for
the chmod command.
Select one of the following options.
l
When an ACL exists, use Linux and Windows semantics, otherwise
use BSD semantics
: Controls file behavior based on whether the new file
inherits ACLs from its parent folder. If it does, the file uses the creator's
primary group. If it does not, the file inherits from its parent folder.
l
BSD semantics - Inherit group owner from the parent folder
: Causes
the group owner to be inherited from the file's parent folder.
l
Linux and Windows semantics - Inherit group owner from the
creator's primary group
: Causes the group owner to be inherited from
the file creator's primary group.
chmod (007)
on files with
existing ACLs
Specifies whether to remove ACLs when running the chmod (007) command.
Select one of the following options.
l
chmod(007) does not remove existing ACL
: Sets 007 UNIX
permissions without removing an existing ACL.
l
chmod(007) removes existing ACL and sets 007 UNIX permissions
:
Removes ACLs from files over UNIX file sharing (NFS) and locally on the
cluster through the chmod (007) command. If you enable this setting,
be sure to run the chmod command on the file immediately after using
chmod (007) to clear an ACL. In most cases, you do not want to leave
007 permissions on the file.
Owner
permissions
It is impossible to represent the breadth of a Windows ACL's access rules using
a set of UNIX permissions. Therefore, when a UNIX client requests UNIX
permissions for a file with an ACL over NFS (an action known as a "stat"), it
receives an imperfect approximation of the file's true permissions. By default,
executing an ls -lcommand from a UNIX client returns a more open set of
permissions than the user expects. This permissiveness compensates for
applications that incorrectly inspect the UNIX permissions themselves when
determining whether to attempt a file-system operation. The purpose of this
policy setting is to ensure that these applications proceed with the operation
to allow the file system to properly determine user access through the ACL.
Select one of the following options.
l
Approximate owner mode bits using all possible owner ACEs
:
Makes the owner permissions appear more permissive than the actual
permissions on the file.
Authentication and access control
96
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
Setting
Description
-
-
l
Approximate owner mode bits using only the ACE with the owner
ID
: Makes the owner permissions appear more accurate, in that you see
only the permissions for a particular owner and not the more permissive
set. However, this may cause access-denied problems for UNIX clients.
group
permissions
Select one of the following options for group permissions:
l
Approximate group mode bits using all possible group ACEs
: Makes
the group permissions appear more permissive than the actual
permissions on the file.
l
Approximate group mode bits using only the ACE with the group
ID
: Makes the group permissions appear more accurate, in that you see
only the permissions for a particular group and not the more permissive
set. However, this may cause access-denied problems for UNIX clients.
No "deny"
ACEs
The Windows ACL user interface cannot display an ACL if any "deny" ACEs are
out of canonical ACL order. However, in order to correctly represent UNIX
permissions, deny ACEs may be required to be out of canonical ACL order.
Select one of the following options.
l
Remove “deny” ACEs from synthetic ACLs
: Does not include "deny"
ACEs when generating synthetic ACLs. This setting can cause ACLs to be
more permissive than the equivalent mode bits.
l
Do not modify synthetic ACLs and mode bit approximations
:
Specifies to not modify synthetic ACL generation; “deny” ACEs will be
generated when necessary.
CAUTION
This option can lead to permissions being reordered, permanently
denying access if a Windows user or an application performs an ACL get,
an ACL modification, and an ACL set (known as a "roundtrip") to and from
Windows.
Access check
(utimes)
You can control who can change utimes, which are the access and
modification times of a file, by selecting one of the following options.
l
Allow only owners to change utimes to client-specific times (POSIX
compliant)
: Allows only owners to change utimes, which complies with
the POSIX standard—an approach that is probably familiar to
administrators of UNIX systems.
l
Allow owners and users with ‘write’ access to change utimes to
client-specific times
: Allows owners as well as users with write access to
modify utimes—a less restrictive approach that is probably familiar to
administrators of Windows systems.
Update cluster permissions
You can update file permissions or ownership by running the Repair Permissions job. To
prevent permissions issues that can occur after changing the on-disk identity, run this
Authentication and access control
Update cluster permissions
97
job with the 'convert permissions' task to ensure that the changes are fully propagated
throughout the cluster.
Procedure
1. Click Protocols
ACLs
Repair Permissions Job.
2. Optional: From the Priority list, select the priority level at which to run the job in
relation to other jobs.
3. Optional: From the Impact policy list, select an impact policy for the job to follow.
4. From the Repair task list, select one of the following methods for updating
permissions:
Options
Description
Convert
permissions
For each file and directory in the specified Path to repair
directory, converts the owner, group, and access control list
(ACL) to the target on-disk identity.
Clone
permissions
Applies the permissions settings for the directory specified
by the Template Directory setting to the Path to repair
directory.
Inherit
permissions
Recursively applies the ACL of the directory that is specified
by the Template Directory setting to each file and
subdirectory in the specified Path to repair directory,
according to standard inheritance rules.
The remaining settings differ depending on the selected repair task.
5. In the Path to repair field, type or browse to the directory in 
/ifs
whose permissions
you want to repair.
6. Optional: In the Template Directory field, type or browse to the directory in 
/ifs
that
you want to copy permissions from. This setting applies to only the Clone
permissions and Inherit permissions repair tasks.
7. Optional: From the Target list, select the preferred on-disk identity type to apply. This
setting applies to only the Convert permissions repair task.
Options
Description
Use default system
type
Applies the system's default identity type.
Use native type
If a user or group does not have an authoritative
UNIX identifier (UID or GID), applies the Windows
identity type (SID).
Use UNIX type
Applies the UNIX identity type.
Use SID (Windows)
type
Applies the Windows identity type.
8. Optional: From the Access Zone list, select an access zone to use for ID mapping. This
setting applies to only the Convert permissions repair task.
Authentication and access control
98
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
Managing roles
You can view, add, or remove members of any role. Except for built-in roles, whose
privileges you cannot modify, you can add or remove OneFS privileges on a role-by-role
basis.
Note
Roles take both users and groups as members. If a group is added to a role, all users who
are members of that group are assigned the privileges associated with the role. Similarly,
members of multiple roles are assigned the combined privileges of each role.
View roles
You can view information about built-in and custom roles.
This procedure must be performed through the command-line interface (CLI).
Procedure
1. Establish an SSH connection to any node in the cluster.
2. At the command prompt, run one of the following commands.
l
To view a basic list of all roles on the cluster, run:
isi auth roles list
l
To view detailed information about each role on the cluster, including member and
privilege lists, run:
isi auth roles list --verbose
l
To view detailed information about a single role, run the following command,
where 
<role>
is the name of the role:
isi auth roles view <role>
View privileges
You can view user privileges.
This procedure must be performed through the command-line interface (CLI). You can
view a list of your privileges or the privileges of another user using the following
commands:
Procedure
1. At the command prompt, run one of the following commands.
l
To view a list of all privileges:
isi auth privileges --verbose
l
To view a list of your privileges:
isi auth id
l
To view a list of privileges for another user, where 
<user>
specifies the user by
name:
isi auth mapping token <user>
Authentication and access control
Managing roles
99
Create a custom role
To create a custom role, you must first create an empty role and then add privileges and
members to the role.
This procedure must be performed through the command-line interface (CLI).
Procedure
1. Establish an SSH connection to any node in the cluster.
2. At the command prompt, run the following command, where 
<name>
is the name that
you want to assign to the role and --description 
<string>
specifies an optional
description:
isi auth roles create <name> [--description <string>]
After you finish
Add privileges and members to the role by running the isi auth roles modify
command.
Modify a role
You can modify the description and the user or group membership of any role, including
built-in roles. However, you cannot modify the name or privileges that are assigned to
built-in roles.
This procedure must be performed through the command-line interface (CLI).
Procedure
1. Establish an SSH connection to any node in the cluster.
2. At the command prompt, run the following command, where 
<role>
is the role name
and 
<options>
are optional parameters:
isi auth roles modify <role> [<options>]
Delete a custom role
Deleting a role does not affect the privileges or users that are assigned to it. Built-in roles
cannot be deleted.
This procedure must be performed through the command-line interface (CLI).
Procedure
1. Establish an SSH connection to any node in the cluster.
2. At the command prompt, run the following command, where 
<role>
is the name of the
role that you want to delete:
isi auth roles delete <role>
3. At the confirmation prompt, type 
y
.
Managing authentication providers
You can configure one or more LDAP, Active Directory, NIS, and file providers. A local
provider is created automatically when you create an access zone, which allows you to
create a configuration for each access zone so it has its own list of local users that can
Authentication and access control
100
OneFS
7.1 
Web Administration Guide
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested