download pdf file in mvc : Convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi SDK software API .net windows winforms sharepoint download-research-koehler-hurt0-part346

The appearance of the cell nucleus marked a central evo­
lutionary transition, but the sequence of events that led 
to this development and the immediate adaptive bene­
fits it provided to primordial eukaryotic cells remain 
mysterious. Regardless of which selective pressure 
forced the nucleus–cytoplasm compartmentalization, 
it seems clear that by departing from the prokaryotic 
mechanism of co­transcriptional translation several 
immediate problems emerged. Following the physical 
separation of the transcription and translation pro­
cesses, a strong selective pressure must have triggered 
the co­evolution of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) 
and nucleocytoplasmic transport machineries to allow 
the transport of a myriad of molecules (proteins, RNAs 
and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles) between the 
nucleus and cytoplasm. Studies over the past 2 decades 
have revealed that nucleocytoplasmic transport occurs 
by various mechanisms that have in common the use 
of mobile transport receptors, which bind and move 
diverse cargoes. These transporters can pass through the 
highly specialized channels in the nuclear membrane  
that are formed by NPCs
1–3
(BOX1)
.
A general paradigm for nucleocytoplasmic trans­
port was established through the analysis of protein 
import into and export from the nucleus. These studies 
revealed that transport through NPCs requires a family 
of conserved nuclear transport receptors (also known as 
karyopherins or importin­β family members), which rec­
ognize a short peptide signal on a cargo protein — either 
a nuclear localization signal (NLS) or a nuclear export 
signal (NES)
2–4
. Moreover, karyopherins can recognize 
nucleotide motifs in RNA cargoes, which also enables  
them to export RNAs. Typically, karyopherins that 
import cargo are called importins and karyopherins  
that export cargo are called exportins.
A feature of karyopherins is their regulation by the 
small GTPase Ran
5
. Ran exists in a GTP­bound state in 
the nucleus and a GDP­bound state in the cytoplasm. 
The RanGTP–RanGDP gradient across the nuclear 
membrane is generated by the action of two regulators, 
RanGEF (Ran­GDP­exchange factor) in the nucleus 
and RanGAP (Ran­GTPase­activating protein) in the 
cytoplasm, and creates a driving force for directional 
nucleocytoplasmic transport processes
3
. Importins bind 
cargo in the cytoplasm and release it after transport into 
the nucleus upon binding of RanGTP. On the other 
hand, exportins bind nuclear cargo only together with 
RanGTP, and this ternary complex is translocated to 
the cytoplasm, where it dissociates upon hydrolysis of 
RanGTP by RanGAP.
Export of tRNA, microRNA (miRNA), small nuclear 
(sn)RNA and ribosomal (r)RNA follows this general 
paradigm that involves exportins of the karyopherin 
family and the Ran cycle
6
. However, general mRNA 
export is mechanistically different as it uses a transport 
receptor that is unrelated to karyopherins and does not 
directly depend on the RanGTP–RanGDP gradient
7,8
Moreover, numerous additional export factors (for 
example, adaptors and release factors) cooperate with 
the mRNA export receptor
6,9–11
.
In this review, we provide an overview of the major 
RNA export pathways 
(FIG.1)
starting with the simpler 
export routes of small RNAs and then discussing the 
sophisticated biogenesis and export mechanisms of 
*Biochemie-Zentrum der 
Universität Heidelberg,  
Im Neuenheimer Feld 328, 
69120 Heidelberg, Germany. 
Universitätskinderklinik 
Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer 
Feld 151, 69120 Heidelberg, 
Germany. 
Correspondence to E.H. 
e-mail:  
ed.hurt@bzh.uni-heidelberg.de
doi:10.1038/nrm2255
Publishedonline
5September2007
Exporting RNA from the nucleus  
to the cytoplasm
Alwin Köhler*
and Ed Hurt*
Abstract | The transport of RNA molecules from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is fundamental 
for gene expression. The different RNA species that are produced in the nucleus are 
exported through the nuclear pore complexes via mobile export receptors. Small RNAs  
(such as tRNAs and microRNAs) follow relatively simple export routes by binding directly  
to export receptors. Large RNAs (such as ribosomal RNAs and mRNAs) assemble into 
complicated ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles and recruit their exporters via class-specific 
adaptor proteins. Export of mRNAs is unique as it is extensively coupled to transcription  
(in yeast) and splicing (in metazoa). Understanding the mechanisms that connect RNP 
formation with export is a major challenge in the field.
REVIEWS
NATuRE REvIEwS 
|
molecular cell biology 
ADvANCE ONLINE PubLICATION 
|
Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 
|
AOP, published online 5 September 2007; doi:10.1038/nrm2255
©
2007
Nature Publishing Group 
Convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi; convert pdf file to jpg on
Convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change file from pdf to jpg; convert pdf document to jpg
FG
FG
FG
FG
FG
FG
FG
FG
FG
Metazoa
Yeast
Nup57
NUP107
complex
Nup84
complex
Nup84
complex
Nsp1
Nup49
NUP98
NUP153
Nup1
Nup60
Mlp1–Mlp2
TPR
Nup116
Gle2
RAE1
NUP62
NUP88
NUP214
Nsp1
Nup82
Nup159
Dbp5
DBP5
Gle1
GLE1
Nup42
CG1
NUP358
NUP107
complex
Nucleus
Cytoplasm
mRNA
60S, 40S
ribosomal
subunits
mRNA, 60S
ribosomal
subunits
mRNA
60S
ribosomal
subunit
mRNA
60S, 40S
ribosomal
subunits
mRNA
60S, 40S
ribosomal
subunits
mRNA
snRNA
mRNA
rRNA
snRNA
mRNA
rRNA
mRNA
tRNA
rRNA
mRNA
mRNA
mRNA
mRNA
mRNA
mRNA
mRNA
mRNA
mRNA
much larger RNP particles. Minor export pathways of 
individual RNAs like the 
signalrecognitionparticle7SRNA
will not be covered. we do not discuss the nuclear export 
of viral RNAs in depth (the reader is referred to 
ReF.12
), 
but refer to them whenever they illuminate the function 
of a host system that has been exploited.
Export of tRNAs
Aminoacylated tRNAs are needed in the cytoplasm for 
ribosomal translation. About 40 different tRNAs exist 
in eukaryotic cells, and these tRNAs are short in length 
and contain single­stranded loops and double­stranded 
minihelix regions that fold into uniform cloverleaf 
structures. tRNAs are synthesized as larger precursors 
in the nucleus by RNA polymerase III (Pol III) 
(FIG.2)
Subsequent RNA­processing steps include removal of 
the 5′ and 3′ trailer sequences, CCA­nucleotide addi­
tion to the 3′ end to form the amino­acid acceptor stem, 
removal of introns (when present) by a specific tRNA­
splicing endonuclease and numerous base modifications 
by tRNA­modifying enzymes
13
. After RNA processing 
and maturation, tRNAs are exported to the cytoplasm. 
Studies in several organisms established that fully pro­
cessed, mature tRNAs are preferentially selected by 
the tRNA export machinery
14,15
. However, although it 
was initially suspected that tRNA splicing occurs in the 
nucleus before export, a recent study showed that the 
yeast tRNA­splicing endonuclease is associated with  
the outer mitochondrial membrane
16
. unexpectedly, two 
other studies reported that mature, cytoplasmic tRNAs 
can be re­imported into the nucleus
17,18
. The implica­
tions of these findings are currently unclear, although a  
function in tRNA quality control has been suggested.
The classical tRNA export route. Export of tRNA follows 
the general paradigm of exportin­mediated protein export. 
The class­specific tRNA export receptor exportin­t,  
a member of the karyopherin superfamily, binds directly 
to tRNAs in a RanGTP­dependent manner
19,20
(
FIG.2
Supplementary information S1 (table)). The NESs in the 
tRNAs that are decoded by exportin­t are not linear motifs, 
but rather are coded in secondary and tertiary structural 
elements (such as minihelices) and properly processed 
5′ and 3′ termini, which suggests that exportin­t can 
monitor the correct structural integrity of tRNAs before 
export
15,21
. However, exportin­t does not discriminate 
between intron­containing and spliced tRNAs
15,21
. After 
transport of the tRNA–exportin­t–RanGTP complex to 
the cytoplasm, RanGAP stimulates GTP hydrolysis on 
Ran, which induces release of the tRNA cargo from its 
receptor. Exportin­t is the principal tRNA exporter in 
vertebrate cells, but exportin­5, another member of the 
karyopherin family, is thought to be an auxiliary recep­
tor
22,23
. The main role of exportin­5, however, is to export 
miRNAs (see below).
Additional tRNA export routes. Notably, the yeast tRNA 
export receptor Los1, an orthologue of exportin­t
24
, is 
not essential for viability. This finding supported the idea 
that Los1­independent tRNA nuclear export pathways 
could exist. One of these alternative tRNA export routes 
Box 1 | NPC organization and nucleoporins with a role in RNA export
Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large assemblies (~125 nm in diameter, with a mass 
of 125 MDa in metazoa and 60 MDa in yeast) that are embedded in the nuclear 
envelope. NPCs have an eightfold symmetrical core structure (called the spoke 
complex) that is sandwiched between a cytoplasmic and a nuclear ring158. The 8 spoke 
units surround the centre of the NPC through which active transport takes place. A 
structure called the nuclear basket and 8 short cytoplasmic fibrils (only 4 are shown) are 
attached, respectively, to the nuclear and cytoplasmic ring of the NPC (see figure).
The NPC is formed by ~30 different nuclear pore proteins (nucleoporins) that exist in  
8  or 16 (or sometimes 32) copies per NPC
159,160
. Nucleoporins are grouped into three 
major classes. The first class are the FG nucleoporins, which contain Phe-Gly-rich repeat 
domains that fill up the active transport channel and function directly in 
nucleocytoplasmic transport by mediating the passage of the soluble transport 
receptors161,162. The second class are nucleoporins that are devoid of FG-repeat 
sequences; these are the predominant structural constituents of the NPC. The third 
class are Nups, which are integral membrane proteins and are thought to anchor the 
NPC in the nuclear membrane. FG nucleoporins can interact directly with the shuttling 
transport receptors161. Hydrophobic patches on the surface of these transporters bind 
transiently to the Phe residues that are part of the FG nucleoporin network in the active 
transport channel161,163.
Most of the nucleoporins are located symmetrically on both sides of the NPC, but a 
few nucleoporins are found asymmetrically either on the cytoplasmic or nuclear side of 
the NPC. The asymmetrically located nucleoporins are thought to be involved in 
directional transport processes (initial receptor targeting or termination of transport) or 
to fulfil compartment-specific functions at the NPC (for example, interacting with 
chromatin or the transcription machinery, or as checkpoint proteins for quality-control 
steps during cargo export). Nucleoporins, which have been implicated in RNA export, 
are indicated (see main text for details). snRNA, small nuclear RNA; rRNA, ribosomal 
RNA. Orthologous proteins or complexes between yeast and metazoa are shown in the 
same colour.
REVIEWS
 
|
ADvANCE ONLINE PubLICATION 
www.nature.com/reviews/molcellbio
©
2007
Nature Publishing Group 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(0) ' Convert the first New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get the first page of PDF.
convert pdf to jpg c#; convert pdf photo to jpg
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and Description: Convert all the PDF pages to
convert pdf to jpeg; convert pdf page to jpg
5′
5′
3′
3′
3′
Ran
GTP
Exp-t
Ran
GTP
Exp-5
Ran
GTP
CRM1
AAAA
AAAA
AAAA
Cap
Cap
Cap
ALY/Yra1
TAP/Mex67
p15/
Mtr2
Mex67
Mtr2
Arx1
Intron
Processing, maturation and assembly with export factors
tRNA
miRNA
snRNA
mRNA
rRNA
Nucleus
Cytoplasm
Ran
GTP
CRM1
Signal recognition particle 
7S RNA
Thesignalrecognitionparticle
isanevolutionarilyconserved
RNA–proteincomplexthat
containsa7SRNAspeciesand
targetsintegralmembraneand
secretoryproteinstothe
translocationmachineryofthe
endoplasmicreticulum.
5 cap
Astructureatthe5endof
eukaryoticmRNAsthat
consistsofthem7GpppNcap
(inwhichm7Grepresents
7‑methylguanylateandppp
representsanunusual5′→5
triphosphatelinkagefromm7G
toN,whichisthefirstregular
nucleotideofthemRNA).
is linked to the aminoacylation machinery 
(FIG.2)
. 
study in yeast showed that the function of the Los1 tRNA 
export receptor became essential when the activity of an  
aminoacyl­tRNA synthetase cofactor (Arc1) was 
impaired
25
. Additional studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes 
and yeast demonstrated that aminoacylation of tRNAs 
can occur in the nucleus and, accordingly, aminoacylated 
tRNAs are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm
26–28
 
Moreover, factors of the translational machinery were 
shown to be required for efficient tRNA export in vivo
13
Taken together, these different findings point to the 
existence of another tRNA export pathway that overlaps 
with the Los1­dependent route. However, no clear export 
receptor candidate has as yet been identified
27,29
. Recently, 
novel auxiliary export factors that function upstream and 
downstream of the tRNA­transport step through the 
NPC were described. One of them, Cex1, was suggested 
to deliver the aminoacylated tRNAs from the nuclear 
export receptor at the cytoplasmic side of the NPC to the 
ribosomal elongation factor eEF1α
30
.
Export of miRNAs
miRNAs, a class of non­coding RNAs that participate 
in gene regulation, are exported by the karyopherin 
exportin­5. miRNAs are produced as larger precursors 
in the nucleus and eventually mature in the cytoplasm 
to single­stranded RNA species that induce post­ 
transcriptional gene silencing through base­pairing 
with their target mRNAs in the cytoplasm. miRNAs 
regulate a wide range of biological processes, including 
developmental timing, cell differentiation, apoptosis and 
immunity against viruses
31,32
. miRNA genes comprise an 
abundant class of regulatory molecules in higher eukary­
otes, accounting for ~1% of the genome
31
, and have been  
estimated to target a third of all human genes
33
.
Biogenesis of miRNAs. The genes that encode miRNAs 
can be transcribed by either Pol II or Pol III
34–36
(FIG.2)
The primary transcript derived from Pol II (pri­miRNA) 
transiently receives a 
5cap
and a poly(A) tail similar to 
that of mRNAs. During subsequent miRNA processing, 
however, the cap and poly(A) tail are removed, whereas 
mRNAs keep these modifications. Some miRNAs can 
also be excised co­transcriptionally from the introns 
of coding genes. A characteristic metazoan miRNA 
primary transcript (pri­miRNA) contains a stem with 
a terminal loop and flanking segments. The stem–loop 
harbours a ~22­nucleotide miRNA motif that has to be 
excised, exported and finally assembled into the RNA 
interference (RNAi) effector complex 
(FIG.2)
. The stem–
loop is cut out (this is called cropping) in the nucleus 
by a type III RNase called Drosha
37
, which cooperates 
Figure 1 | The different rNa export pathways. The major RNA export routes are shown (tRNA, microRNA (miRNA), 
small nuclear (sn)RNA, mRNA, ribosomal (r)RNA). In each case, the primary RNA transcript is shown, as well as the 
transport-competent RNA after it has undergone processing, maturation and assembly with export factors (export 
adaptors are shown in blue, export receptors are shown in yellow). Prominent structural motifs in pre-RNAs are indicated 
(single/double-stranded RNA, loops, exons and introns, 5′ cap and 3′ poly(A) tail). For the mRNA export route, the names  
of both metazoan and yeast proteins are indicated, and mRNAs are shown with additional adaptor proteins and RNA-
binding factors (orange ovals). In the case of rRNA, the general exporter in eukaryotes, CRM1, and two auxiliary exporters, 
Mex67–Mtr2 and Arx1, that have only been studied in yeast are depicted. CBC, cap-binding complex; Exp, exportin.
REVIEWS
NATuRE REvIEwS 
|
molecular cell biology 
ADvANCE ONLINE PubLICATION 
|
©
2007
Nature Publishing Group 
RNA Pol II
Intron
Intron
5′
3′
Intron
5′
3′
Primary transcript
Primary transcript
miRNA in intron
of gene
tRNA
Pre-miRNA
miRNA duplex
RISC
5′ and 3′ processing,
base modifications,
CCA addition
C
C
A
C
C
A
C
C
A
Intron-containing
pre-tRNA
tRNA
Aminoacylated
tRNA
Exportin-t/Los1
(exportin-5/Msn5,
other pathways?)
Cex1
eEF1α
Nucleus
Cytoplasm
Nucleus
Cytoplasm
Aminoacylation
Translation
Splicing
Splicing
aa
tRNA-splicing
endonuclease
AAAA
AAAA
Cap
Cap
AAAA
Cap
Exon
Exon
Drosha
DGCR8
Dicer
Ran
GTP
Exportin-5
Exportin-5
Spliced mRNA
a
tRNA export
b
miRNA export
aa
Ran
GTP
Ran
GDP
Mitochondrion
Exportin-t
Ran
GDP
Figure 2 | Nuclear export of trNa and microrNa. a | Transcription of a tRNA gene by RNA polymerase III (Pol III) 
generates a primary transcript, which in some cases contains an intron, with 5′ and 3′ extensions. After 5′ and 3′ 
processing, base modifications (red circles) and CCA-nucleotide addition at the 3′ end, the resulting tRNAs can follow 
different export routes. Intron-containing and intron-free tRNAs (aminoacylated or not) are exported either by the 
exportin-t/Los1-dependent pathway, or by other less well characterized routes. After export to the cytoplasm and 
dissociation of the tRNA cargo from its receptor, intron-containing tRNA is spliced by the tRNA-splicing machinery, which 
is bound to the outer mitochondrial membrane in yeast. Mature tRNA is then channelled to the translational machinery by 
release factors such as Cex1 and eEF1α. b | For microRNA (miRNA), only the Pol II-dependent generation of the primary 
mRNA (pri-mRNAs) is depicted. miRNAs can be encoded by an miRNA gene situated in the intron of a coding gene (left 
branch) or from a separate miRNA gene (right branch). In both cases, the primary transcript is cleaved by the Drosha–
DGCR8 complex to generate a pre-miRNA with a stem–loop structure. Moreover, a spliced mRNA can be generated 
concomitantly with the excision of an intronic miRNA. The pre-miRNA with its typical ~2-nucleotide overhang at its 3′  
end is specifically recognized by exportin-5 and is transported to the cytoplasm, where it dissociates from its receptor 
after RanGTP hydrolysis. Following release from exportin-5, Dicer further cleaves the pre-miRNA to finally generate a 
single-stranded miRNA species, which assembles into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Highlighted in blue is 
the RNA region that corresponds to the mature effector miRNA.
REVIEWS
 
|
ADvANCE ONLINE PubLICATION 
www.nature.com/reviews/molcellbio
©
2007
Nature Publishing Group 
P bodies
(Processingbodies).Discrete
cytoplasmicfocithataresites
ofdegradationandsurveillance
ofmRNAsandRNA‑mediated
genesilencing.
Short hairpin RNA 
Artificiallygenerated,usually
vector‑encoded,RNAthat
resemblespre‑miRNAin
structureandisusedto
experimentallyinduceRNA
interference.
Small interfering RNA
(siRNA).Shortdouble‑stranded
RNAfragmentof~22
nucleotidesthatisderived
fromlongerdouble‑stranded
shorthairpinRNA.siRNAs
guidesilencingcomplexesto
theirtargetsbybasepairing
withspecificmRNAsequences.
Survival of motor neurons 
(SMN) complex
Alargemultiproteincomplex
thatbringstogethertheSm
proteinsandsmallnuclear
RNAs,therebyfacilitatingsmall
nuclearribonucleoprotein
assembly.
Sm proteins
Asetofsevenproteinsthatare
arrangedasaringstructureon
aspecificsmallnuclearRNA‑
bindingsitetobecomepartof
spliceosomalsmallnuclear
ribonucleoproteins.
with the RNA­binding protein DGCR8
38
. DGCR8 is 
thought to function as a molecular ruler that measures 
the distance from the base of the stem and thus positions 
Drosha precisely for cleavage
38
.
The released ~65­nucleotide stem–loop intermedi­
ate (now called pre­miRNA) is subsequently exported 
to the cytoplasm in a RanGTP­dependent manner by 
exportin­5, a member of the karyopherin family
39–41
(FIG.2)
. After release in the cytoplasm upon GTP hydrol­
ysis on Ran, the pre­miRNA hairpin is further cleaved 
by Dicer, another type III RNase that produces a ~22­
nucleotide miRNA duplex
42
that contains imperfect base 
pairings. These mismatches cause one duplex strand  
to be less stably base paired at its 5′ end, which leads to 
its degradation, while the other strand is incorporated 
into an effector complex known as the RNA­induced 
silencing complex (RISC)
42–44
. RISC finally binds to its 
target mRNA through base pairing of the miRNA to 
the 3′ untranslated region (3′ uTR), thereby inducing 
mRNA cleavage, translational inhibition by sequester­
ing the translational apparatus in 
Pbodies
or cleavage­ 
independent mRNA degradation
45,46
.
Coupling of miRNA processing with export. biogenesis and 
nuclear export of miRNAs are coupled at several levels
32
 
The key enzyme involved in this coupling is Drosha, 
which generates a double­stranded RNA minihelix with a 
~2­nucleotide 3′ overhang, the unique structure of which 
is recognized both by exportin­5 and the downstream­
acting processing enzyme Dicer. Thus, a strict linkage of 
all processing and export steps ensures the high specificity  
of miRNA production and function 
(FIG.2)
.
Notably, many human miRNA genes are embedded 
in the intronic regions of coding genes and thus use an 
unusual biogenesis pathway, as their production is coupled  
to mRNA splicing
47–49
(FIG.2)
. It seems that Drosha 
releases the pre­miRNA from the intron shortly before 
splicing, allowing the generation of both RNA species at 
the same time
49
Nuclear export of miRNA has important implications for 
applied aspects of RNAi technology
50
, as 
shorthairpinRNAs
use the same export pathway to produce 
smallinterfering
(si)RNAs
51
. The expression of exportin­5 is low in most cell 
types, which suggests that the miRNA export receptor 
could limit the desired expression of siRNAs when used 
as a therapeutic tool in molecular medicine
51
.
Export of snRNAs
The minimalist nuclear export device for RNA requires 
‘naked’ RNA as cargo, an exportin and RanGTP. 
Although this model is sufficient to explain export of 
tRNAs and miRNAs, it does not account for the nuclear 
export of other cellular RNAs, which require more 
elaborate transport mechanisms. In terms of complexity, 
spliceosomal snRNAs lie between tRNAs/miRNAs and 
mRNAs/rRNAs. Their export requires adaptor proteins 
that recruit the export receptor (a mechanism that is 
extensively used in the case of mRNA and rRNA export). 
However, assembly into an RNP, another hallmark of 
mRNA and rRNA transport, is not needed for the nuclear 
export of snRNAs.
Spliceosomal snRNP biogenesis. The spliceosomal snRNAs 
participate in the removal of introns from pre­mRNAs. 
with the exception of u6 snRNA, which is produced by 
Pol III and does not exit from the nucleus, all the other 
spliceosomal snRNAs (u1, u2, u4 and u5) are synthe­
sized as precursors (pre­snRNAs) by Pol II and acquire 
a 5′ cap that constitutes the signal for nuclear export 
(FIG.1)
. However, pre­snRNAs do not become polyadenyl­
ated, although they exhibit specific 3′­end processing 
that requires factors related, but not identical, to the 
3′­end processing machinery that acts on pre­mRNAs
52
why snRNA is exported from the nucleus before being 
imported again to function in splicing is still unknown, 
but it was proposed that the cytoplasmic phase of snRNA 
biogenesis might provide a proofreading step to prevent 
nuclear accumulation of non­functional snRNAs
53
.
Phosphorylation-dependent snRNA export. The export 
receptor for snRNA is CRM1 (also known as exportin­1), 
the general protein exporter that recognizes the Leu­
rich­type NES on proteins
54,55
. Consistently, CRM1 does 
not directly interact with the snRNA cargo, but requires 
the cap­binding complex (CbC) and a NES­containing  
adaptor protein called PHAX to be targeted to the 
5′ cap of the snRNA
56–58
. Phosphorylation of PHAX in 
the nucleus is required for recruitment of CRM1 and 
RanGTP to the CbC­bound snRNA complex 
(FIG.1)
After export to the cytoplasm, GTP hydrolysis of Ran and 
dephosphorylation of PHAX are necessary to efficiently 
dissociate the export complex and release the snRNA
58
Once in the cytoplasm, the 
survivalofmotorneurons(SMN)
complex
facilitates the assembly of the exported snRNA 
with a heteroheptameric ring of 
Smproteins
, which bind 
to a conserved Sm­binding site that is present on each 
snRNA
53
. binding of Sm proteins induces trimethylation 
of the cap and exonucleolytic removal of the 3′ trailer 
sequences. The trimethylated cap and the associated Sm 
proteins provide a composite nuclear targeting signal for 
subsequent nuclear import of the mature snRNPs
59
. After 
re­import into the nucleus, snRNPs together with numer­
ous other splicing factors assemble into the functional 
spliceosome
53
.
Export of mRNAs
RNA classes with highly related structures (tRNAs and 
miRNAs) exhibit common identity elements that can 
be decoded by class­specific export receptors. mRNAs, 
however, differ substantially in length, sequence and 
structure, and so use other strategies to find their class­
specific export receptors. mRNAs are channelled into  
the specific export pathway coordinately with their 
processing and assembly into messenger (m)RNPs. 
Typically, eukaryotic mRNAs are synthesized by Pol II 
as precursors (pre­mRNAs) that become capped at the 
5′ end, spliced, cleaved at the 3′ end and polyadenylated 
(FIG.1)
. During the successive steps of mRNP formation, 
many RNA­binding and ­modifying proteins (for exam­
ple, capping, splicing and processing factors) are recruited 
to the transcripts. Genome­wide analyses revealed a pref­
erential association of certain RNA­binding proteins with 
distinct functional classes of mRNAs, which suggests 
REVIEWS
NATuRE REvIEwS 
|
molecular cell biology 
ADvANCE ONLINE PubLICATION 
|
©
2007
Nature Publishing Group 
AU-rich element
Amotifthatislocatedinthe
3‑untranslatedregionofsome
mRNAsandthatcaninduce
rapidmRNAdecay.
SR (Ser/Arg-rich) proteins
Anabundantclassofproteins
thatareinvolvedinvarious
aspectsofmRNAmetabolism.
TheycontainoneortwoRNA‑
recognitionmotifsandan
Arg/Ser‑richdomainthatcan
bephosphorylatedatmultiple
positions.
that biogenesis, export and translation of mRNA subpop­
ulations may be coordinated differently
60,61
. Among the 
factors bound to the pre­mRNAs are also export adap­
tors that serve to establish a physical bridge between the 
mRNA molecule and its export receptor. Studies carried 
out in a number of different model organisms revealed 
that the mRNA export pathway is conserved from yeast 
to humans, although every model organism has its own 
peculiarities
7,9,12,62
.
Practically every step of mRNA biogenesis involves 
rigorous quality control to detect possible errors in trans­
cription, mRNA processing or export
63
. Nuclear mRNA 
surveillance has been studied mostly in Saccharomyces
cerevisiae. In analogy to the cytoplasmic machineries, 
nuclear pre­mRNAs can be degraded from either the 5′ or 
3′ end. The actual pathway seems to depend on intrinsic  
features of the substrate (for example, the stage of bio­
genesis, intron­containing or not, and so on). mRNA 
decay in the 3′→5′ direction (for example, mRNAs with 
defective poly(A) tails) is mediated by the exosome, a 
complex of exonucleases that is functionally connected to 
various activating cofactors
63–66
. Apart from pre­mRNA 
turnover, the exosome is also responsible for degrading 
aberrant tRNAs, snRNAs, small nucleolar RNAs and 
rRNAs
67
. Another quality checkpoint is provided by the 
Mlp1Mlp2 system, which consists of two filamentous 
proteins that are attached to the nuclear face of NPCs and 
prevent the exit of unspliced transcripts
63,68–70
.
A general and a specific mRNA receptor. The yeast 
Mex67Mtr2 complex and the homologous metazoan 
TAP–p15 complex (also known as NXF1–NXT1) func­
tion as general mRNA export receptors to transport 
mRNPs through the NPCs
71,72
. Although the mRNA 
exporter can bind directly to RNA, it operates together 
with adaptor RNA­binding proteins 
(FIG.3)
. The con­
served mRNA exporter is structurally unrelated to the 
karyopherins and is RanGTP independent; therefore, 
directionality of transport would have to be established by 
other mechanisms. Nevertheless, like karyopherins, the 
mRNA exporter can physically interact with the Phe­Gly­
rich repeats of FG nucleoporins, which allows it to over­
come the permeability barrier of the NPC that is formed 
by the FG­nucleoporin meshwork
7,10,62
(BOX1)
. besides 
its physiological role in cellular mRNA export, human 
TAP transports a set of viral pre­mRNAs to the cyto­
plasm by binding directly to specific viral RNA elements  
called constitutive transport elements (CTEs)
72
.
The general RanGTP­dependent protein export 
receptor CRM1 does not have a major role in mRNA 
export
73,74
. However, CRM1 can be involved in the nuclear 
export of a subset of transcripts, such as mRNAs of sev­
eral protooncogenes and cytokines, that contain 
AU‑rich
elements
(AREs) in their 3′ uTRs
75
. These AREs can target 
NES­containing adaptor proteins and hence become con­
nected to the CRM1­dependent export pathway. In yeast, 
Crm1 was recently reported to be required for export of 
the unspliced YRA1 pre­mRNA (Yra1 is itself an mRNA 
export adaptor; see below)
76
. However, the mechanistic 
details of how Crm1 in conjunction with Mex67–Mtr2 can 
export an unspliced pre­mRNA are currently not clear.
Finally, it is well established that CRM1 acts in the 
nuclear export of a number of unspliced and partially 
spliced viral mRNAs. These viral mRNAs can bind adap­
tor proteins that contain NESs (for example, HIv Rev, 
adenovirus E1b 55 kDa), thereby targeting the transport 
receptor CRM1 
(ReF.12)
. In fact, it was the identification 
of the NES in HIv Rev that led to the discovery of the 
CRM1­dependent nuclear protein export pathway
54
.
The Yra1/ALY/REF adaptor. The mRNA export recep­
tor is targeted to different transcripts by export adaptors 
that are typically mRNA­binding proteins. So far, only 
a few of these adaptor proteins have been identified, 
but it is likely that more will be uncovered among the 
huge number of predicted RNA­binding proteins in 
eukaryotic cells.
The Yra1 or ALY/REF adaptor (Yra1 in yeast and 
ALY or REF in metazoa) can associate directly with the 
general mRNA exporter
7,62
(FIG.3)
. Moreover, Yra1 and 
ALY/REF physically interact with another conserved 
export factor — Sub2 in yeast and uAP56 in metazoa
77,78
Sub2 and uAP56 are RNA helicases that can associate 
with several complexes involved in mRNP biogenesis 
(for example, the TREX (transcription­coupled export) 
complex and the spliceosome; see below). Thus, Yra1 
and ALY/REF form a bridge between an upstream­acting 
RNA­binding protein and a downstream­acting mRNA 
export receptor. Consistent with this model, Yra1 is  
co­transcriptionally recruited to nascent transcripts and 
is therefore present at different steps during pre­mRNA 
formation and processing
79,80
.
In addition to its role in export of cellular mRNAs, 
ALY/REF can function as an adaptor for the export of 
viral intronless mRNAs. For example, the herpes sim­
plex virus protein ICP27 targets ALY/REF to access the 
TAP–p15­mediated export pathway of the host cell
81
SR proteins can function as adaptors. The 
SR(Ser/Arg‑rich)
proteins
have essential roles in splicing but also function 
as adaptors and regulators of multiple steps of mRNA 
metabolism including mRNA export, stability and 
translation
11
. SR proteins are abundant, evolutionarily 
conserved phosphoproteins. After splicing, several SR 
proteins remain bound to the spliced transcript and are 
exported to the cytoplasm, where they dissociate from 
the transcript and are re­imported
82
. Shuttling SR pro­
teins (for example, SRP20 or 9G8) can recruit the general 
mRNA export receptor TAP–p15. TAP–p15 can bind 
directly to the SR motifs, which are sites of reversible  
phosphorylation
83,84
. SR proteins are recruited in a hyper­
phosphorylated form to the splicing machinery, but after 
splicing become hypophosphorylated, which favours the 
binding of TAP–p15 
(ReF.83)
. Thus, the phosphorylation 
status of SR proteins could act as a switch to signal the 
export competence of the spliced mRNP.
A cycle of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation 
of an SR protein (Npl3) has also been implicated in a 
termination step during mRNA export in yeast
85
. Npl3 is 
first phosphorylated by the Sky1 kinase in the cytoplasm, 
which stimulates nuclear import of Npl3 
(ReF.86)
. In the 
nucleus, Npl3 can associate with the nascent transcript in 
REVIEWS
 
|
ADvANCE ONLINE PubLICATION 
www.nature.com/reviews/molcellbio
©
2007
Nature Publishing Group 
Cytoplasm
Cytoplasm
CBC
Sub2
Transcription
Transcription
Recruitment
and export
Recruitment
and export
Translocation
and termination
Release and
re-import
Release and
re-import
Translation
initiation
Translation
initiation
Pol II
Pol II
THO
Yra1
Yra1
Yra1
TREX
Sub2
THO
THO
TREX
UAP56
THO
UAP56
Mex67
Mtr2
Mex67
Mtr2
Gle1
InsP
6
Npl3
Npl3
Dbp5
Gle1
Mex67
Mtr2
AAAA
AAAA
AAAA
AAAA
Yra1
Mex67
Mtr2
CBC
CBC
eIF4A
CBC
AAAA
Npl3
eIF4A
AAAA
SR
E I
I
I
E
E
E
AAAA
CBC
ALY
ALY
ALY
Splicing
TAP
TAP
p15
p15
TAP
p15
TAP
p15
a
Yeast
b
Metazoa
CBC
ALY
EJC
SR
SR
Dbp5
Cap
Cap
EJC
a transcription­dependent manner
87
. Subsequently, Npl3 
becomes dephosphorylated by the nuclear phosphatase 
Glc7, allowing interaction with the Mex67–Mtr2 export 
receptor. After transport of the mRNP to the cytoplasm, 
Npl3 is rephosphorylated by Sky1, which destabilizes  
the interaction of Npl3 with the mRNA and Mex67–
Mtr2 
(ReF.86)
. Thus, successive phosphorylation and 
dephosphorylation of Npl3 could be a means to impose 
directionality on the mRNA export pathway
85
.
TREX in transcription-coupled export. The conserved 
TREX complex integrates steps in mRNA biogenesis with 
nuclear export. TREX is found in yeast and higher eukary­
otes including Drosophila melanogaster and humans
88–90
Four of the yeast TREX subunits (Tho2, Hpr1, Mft1 and 
Thp2) form a robust subcomplex (THO)
91
that functions 
in various aspects of co­transcriptional mRNP formation 
and transcription­dependent recombination
92
. Two of the 
TREX subunits, Yra1 and Sub2, are export factors that 
Figure 3 | Transcription-coupled or splicing-coupled mrNa export. a | In yeast, the nascent transcript generated  
by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is co-transcriptionally folded and assembled into a pre-messenger ribonucleoprotein  
(pre-mRNP) by the THO/TREX complex (Yra1 and Sub2 are subunits of TREX, and THO is a subcomplex) that accompanies 
the elongating Pol II. After co-transcriptional association with additional pre-mRNA factors (for example, the cap-binding 
complex (CBC) and RNA-binding proteins, shown in orange), the Mex67–Mtr2 mRNA export receptor is recruited to the 
mRNP via adaptor proteins such as Yra1. When emerging at the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore complex (NPC),  
the mRNP encounters a remodelling machinery on the NPC fibrils that consists of the ATP-dependent RNA helicase  
Dbp5 and its activators Gle1 and the signalling molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP
6
). After dissociation of Mex67–
Mtr2 and other export factors from the RNA cargo, the mRNA may still contain a few shuttling RNA-binding proteins,  
such as Npl3, that influence translation. mRNA is recruited to the translation-initiation machinery via its 5′ cap that is 
recognized by the initiation factor eIF4A and by additional initiation factors. Transport factors are re-imported, which in 
some cases requires phosphorylation. b | For metazoa, several mRNA export models have been described. Depicted are 
the splicing- and cap-dependent modes of human TREX recruitment to the mRNP. The downstream events in mRNA 
export, including the recruitment of the TAP–p15 mRNA export receptor, are similar for metazoa and yeast. Export 
receptors are indicated in yellow and adaptors in blue. For simplicity, the exon-junction complex (EJC) on the 
translocating and cytoplasmic mRNP is not shown. E, exon; I, intron; TREX, transcription-coupled export complex.
REVIEWS
NATuRE REvIEwS 
|
molecular cell biology 
ADvANCE ONLINE PubLICATION 
|
©
2007
Nature Publishing Group 
Exon-junction complex
(eJC).Acomplexofproteins
thatisdepositedontomRNA
duringpre‑mRNAsplicing
(~20–24nucleotides
upstreamofexon–exon
junctions).TheeJCremains
boundtothemRNAduring
nuclearexportandinfluences
surveillance,translationand
localizationofmaturemRNAs
inthecytoplasm.
Nonsense-mediated mRNA 
decay
(NMD).Aprocessbywhicha
celldestroysmRNAsforwhich
translationhasbeen
prematurelyterminatedowing
tothepresenceofanonsense
codoninthecodingregion.
generate a physical link with the mRNA export receptor 
(FIG.3)
. In yeast, TREX is continuously loaded onto emerg­
ing transcripts during transcription elongation, which 
facilitates folding of nascent transcripts into mRNPs and 
helps to recruit additional RNA­binding proteins
78,88,93–95
.
when yeast TREX follows the elongating RNA 
polymerase along the activated gene, members of the 
THO subcomplex (for example, Hpr1) bind to chromatin, 
whereas Sub2 and Yra1 associate with nascent mRNA
93
(FIG.3)
. RNAi studies in D. melanogaster and transcrip­
tion profiling have led to the suggestion that the majority  
of mRNAs are transcribed and exported independently of  
TREX
89
. However, TREX mutants show nuclear accumu­
lation of bulk mRNA and are synthetically lethal when 
combined with mutants of the mRNA export machinery, 
which suggests a broad role for TREX in transcription­
coupled mRNA export. In the absence of a functional 
THO subcomplex, the formation of an RNA–DNA hybrid 
between a nascent unfolded transcript and the DNA tem­
plate was observed, and this resulted in the inhibition of 
transcription and the generation of malformed transcripts 
that could not be exported
94
. However, by experimentally 
slowing down transcription, these defects can be partly 
compensated, which suggests that only a limited time win­
dow exists for co­transcriptional loading of RNA­binding 
proteins and export factors onto the nascent transcript
96
.
Despite its conservation, the TREX complex is asso­
ciated with the transcription apparatus in yeast and  
the splicing machinery in humans, possibly reflecting the 
higher prevalence of spliced mRNA in mammals than 
in yeast
9
. Initially, studies carried out in the Reed labora­
tory suggested a close link between splicing and mRNA 
export in higher eukaryotes with a key role for ALY/REF 
and uAP56 in this coupling
97,98
. Subsequent work from 
several laboratories reported that ALY/REF, uAP56 and 
TAP–p15 can associate with the 
exon‑junctioncomplex
(EJC), which is deposited as a consequence of splicing 
~20–24 nucleotides upstream of every exon–exon junc­
tion in the spliced mRNA
99,100
. The EJC operates in the 
nonsense‑mediateddecay
(NMD) pathway. Additionally, 
due to its association with export factors, the EJC was sug­
gested to recruit the mRNA export machinery and link 
splicing with export in metazoa. However, a recent study 
showed that the human TREX complex is recruited in a 
splicing­ and cap­dependent manner only to the 5′ end  
of the mRNA, and this recruitment requires the cap­ 
binding subunit CbP80, which interacts directly with the 
ALY/REF subunit of human TREX
101
(FIG.3)
. This obser­
vation could explain why mRNA transcripts are exported 
in a 5′→3′ direction
102
. Notably, a function for the 5′ cap 
and the CbC in metazoan mRNA export was already 
proposed more than 15 years ago
56
.
In addition, the metazoan mRNA export machinery 
can be loaded onto nascent transcripts by a splicing­
independent mechanism similar to the one in yeast. In 
human cells, the transcription­elongation factor SPT6 
recruits IwS1 to the nascent mRNA, thereby allowing 
IwS1 to act as a bridging protein for ALY/REF
103
. Thus, 
eukaryotic cells can exploit different mechanisms to load 
mRNA­processing and export factors onto newly forming 
mRNPs.
The TREX-2 mRNA export complex. Sac3 was identified 
as an additional mRNA export adaptor in yeast owing 
to its genetic interaction with the TREX complex and 
its ability to physically recruit the Mex67–Mtr2 export 
receptor
104,105
. Sac3, together with Thp1, Sus1 and Cdc31, 
constitute a complex (previously called the Sac3–Thp1–
Sus1–Cdc31 complex)
104,106–108
that we henceforth call 
TREX­2 
(FIG.4)
. TREX­2 is tethered to the inner side of 
the NPC via the nucleoporins Nup1 and Nup60 
(ReF.104)
 
Interestingly, one TREX­2 component, the small protein 
Sus1, also interacts with SAGA, a large transcription­
initiation complex that catalyses histone acetylation 
and deubiquitylation. In SAGA, Sus1 is part of a hetero­
trimeric deubiquitylation module together with Sgf11 and 
the protease ubp8 
(ReFS109,110)
. TREX­2 has therefore 
been proposed to functionally couple SAGA­dependent 
gene expression to mRNA export at the inner side of the 
NPC
106
. This model is supported by recent experiments 
that demonstrated a requirement for both SAGA and 
TREX­2 in the dynamic repositioning of gene loci from 
the nuclear interior to the nuclear periphery
111
.
Gene gating and mRNA export. More than 20 years 
ago, Günter blobel proposed in his provocative gene­
gating hypothesis that every gene in the nucleus is 
physically connected (or gated) to a particular NPC 
in the nuclear membrane
112
. Several recent studies in 
yeast, D. melanogaster and mice indicated that gene 
gating indeed exists, although not in the strict sense as 
originally proposed
113
. In yeast and higher eukaryotes,  
the nuclear periphery was classically considered as 
a zone of transcriptional repression owing to the pre­
sence of silencing factors
113
. However, a number of 
genes are dynamically targeted to the nuclear enve­
lope upon activation, and this positioning appears to 
facilitate transcription and subsequent nuclear mRNA 
export
111,114–119
.
The precise molecular basis for the initial targeting 
and subsequent tethering of genes to the nuclear periph­
ery is currently unclear, but can apparently involve multi­
ple factors 
(FIG.4)
. In support of the idea that gene gating 
and mRNA export are functionally coupled, the SAGA 
transcription­initiation complex was found to generate 
a physical contact with the NPC­associated TREX­2 
mRNA export complex
106,111,120
. Additional gene–NPC 
interactions are mediated between Mex67 and the 
Mlp proteins, between the histone variant Htz1 and  
the nucleoporin Nup2 and through the Nup84 
complex
119,121,122
. These factors might either operate  
synergistically or in a gene­specific manner.
Two general mechanisms of gene gating have 
emerged: either genes can interact directly with the NPC 
via adaptor proteins independently of mRNA produc­
tion (including post­transcriptional tethering)
119,122–124
or transcript formation is necessary for gene gating to 
occur
111,115–118,125
. Taken together, gene gating could be 
a means to create a favourable environment for the 
recruitment of mRNA export factors and mRNA qual­
ity surveillance by the Mlp1–Mlp2 network, which in 
turn could increase the efficiency of mRNP entry into 
the transport channel of the NPC
106,117,120,126
.
REVIEWS
 
|
ADvANCE ONLINE PubLICATION 
www.nature.com/reviews/molcellbio
©
2007
Nature Publishing Group 
Yra1
Cytoplasm
Mex67
Cdc31
Thp1
Sub2
Hpr1
Mft1
Thp2
Sac3
Mtr2
Sus1
Sgf11
Ubp8
SAGA
Sus1
Tho2
Pol II
TREX-2
THO/TREX
Htz1-
containing
nucleosome
Htz1-containing
nucleosome
Nup1
Nup60
Nup2
Mlp1–Mlp2
Cap
Inositol hexakisphosphate
(InsP
6
).Oneofmanysmall
messengerphosphoinositides
thatisfoundincells.InsP
6
is
synthesizedbyIPK1from
inositol1,4,5‑trisphosphate
(InsP
3
),aprecursorthatalso
regulatesthereleaseof
intracellularcalcium.
Directionality and termination of mRNA export. 
unidirectional movement of mRNPs from the 
nucleus into the cytoplasm requires a termination 
step to release the mRNA from its receptor. In prin­
ciple, remodelling of the mRNP upon its arrival in 
the cytoplasm could be a driving force for vectorial 
translocation. ATP­dependent RNA helicases such 
as Dbp5, which are involved in mRNA export, could 
trigger an irreversible ATP­driven mRNP rearrange­
ment at the cytoplasmic side of the NPC
127,128
. Dbp5 
is advantageously located to perform such a role as 
it is associated with the nucleoporin Nup159, which 
is asymmetrically positioned at the cytoplasmic side 
of the NPC
129,130
. However, Dbp5 shuttles between the 
nucleus and the cytoplasm and is already recruited to 
nascent mRNPs during transcription
128,129,131
.
New evidence provides an explanation for how Dbp5 
could dismantle the mRNP and release Mex67–Mtr2 only 
in the cytoplasmic compartment
132–134
. According to these 
studies, Dbp5 exhibits a very low ATP­dependent RNA­
helicase activity, which can be stimulated by Gle1, an 
essential mRNA export factor that is also asymmetrically 
located at the cytoplasmic nuclear pore filaments
133,134
(FIG.3)
. Maximal stimulation of the ATPase activity of 
Dbp5 requires the signalling molecule 
inositolhexakisphos‑
phate
(InsP
6
), which is thought to regulate the interaction 
between Gle1 and Dbp5. Previously, it was also shown 
that the signalling pathway leading to the production of 
cytoplasmic InsP
6
is necessary for Gle1­dependent mRNA 
export in yeast
135
. Taken together, these data have rein­
forced a model of local mRNP remodelling by an RNA 
helicase that becomes activated at the cytoplasmic pore 
filaments. This local activation could generate directional­
ity either by preventing backsliding of the mRNP (like a 
molecular ratchet) from the cytoplasm to the nucleus or 
by exerting a pulling force on the protruding 5′ end of the 
mRNA while in transit
10,136
.
Export of rRNA
Ribosomes are the protein­synthesizing machines of 
the cell. They predominantly translate mRNAs in the 
cytoplasm, but mitochondria and chloroplasts have their 
own set of ribosomes. Ribosomes are composed of a large 
(60S) and a small (40S) subunit, which together contain 
4 rRNA species (28S/25S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA, 5S rRNA 
and 18S rRNA) and more than 70 ribosomal proteins. 
The ribosomal subunits are assembled in the nucleolus 
and are transported to the cytoplasm by multiple export 
receptors.
Ribosome biogenesis. Ribosome biogenesis in eukaryotic 
cells is a highly regulated multistep process. It requires the 
transcription of precursor rRNAs (pre­rRNAs) from the 
ribosomal genes in the nucleolus as well as the synthesis of 
ribosomal proteins in the cytoplasm and the subsequent 
import of these ribosomal proteins into the nucleolus. In 
the nucleolus, the ribosomal proteins are then assembled 
with the nascent pre­rRNA. Ribosome biogenesis and 
export has mainly been analysed in S. cerevisiae. These 
studies revealed that more than 150 non­ribosomal 
factors associate transiently with the evolving pre­ribos­
omal particles on their way from the nucleolus through 
the nucleoplasm into the cytoplasm
137–139
. Notably, the 
nuclear export machinery is not recruited at early stages 
of pre­ribosome assembly (that is, during pre­rRNA 
synthesis, processing and modification), but only at a 
late stage, in the nucleoplasm, when the pre­ribosomal 
particles have already undergone a complicated cascade 
of processing, maturation and quality control.
Export of the ribosomal subunits. During the early stage 
of ribosome biogenesis, pre­60S and pre­40S particles 
are generated in the nucleolus, and these subsequently 
follow separate export routes. Currently, the mechanism 
of 40S subunit export is poorly understood. So far, it is 
only known that the Ran cycle and Crm1 play a role
140
Several pre­40S assembly factors and ribosomal small 
Figure 4 | gene gating and mrNa export. Model of transcription-coupled mRNA export 
in yeast, which involves gating of the activated gene to the nuclear periphery via 
interaction with the nuclear pore complex (NPC). During transcription initiation, SAGA is 
recruited as part of a large transcription pre-initiation complex to the promoter of a gene, 
which at this point is located in the interior of the nucleus. Subsequently, the activated 
gene becomes tethered to the nuclear periphery via an interaction between SAGA and 
the nuclear pore-bound TREX-2 complex (which consists of the subunits Sac3, Thp1,  
Sus1 and Cdc31). Transcription of the tethered gene generates a nascent transcript that 
becomes assembled, with the aid of the THO/TREX complex, into an export-competent 
messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP). Thus, the mRNP is brought into the vicinity of the 
NPC-associated Mex67–Mtr2 mRNA export machinery. Mex67 can also directly contact 
the promoter region independently of the mRNA (not shown). Sus1 is a functional 
component of both TREX-2 and SAGA. Within SAGA, Sus1 is part of a heterotrimeric 
subcomplex together with the histone H2B deubiquitylating enzyme Ubp8 and Sgf11,  
a protein of unknown function. The nucleoporin Nup1 is part of the TREX-2 docking site 
at the nuclear basket. Nup2 was shown to associate with active promoters and might 
tether genes through the histone variant Htz1 in yeast. The Mlp1 and Mlp2 proteins 
contribute to RNA surveillance by retention of unspliced mRNA. Dotted lines represent 
predicted interactions between the complexes. TREX, transcription-coupled export 
complex. Proteins in the same complex have the same colour.
REVIEWS
NATuRE REvIEwS 
|
molecular cell biology 
ADvANCE ONLINE PubLICATION 
|
©
2007
Nature Publishing Group 
Crm1
Nature Reviews | Molecular Cell Biology
Nucleus
Cytoplasm
pre-60S
pre-60S
Nmd3
Nmd3
Arx1
Rpl10
Arx1
Mex67
Mtr2
Mex67
Mtr2
pre-60S
Arx1
pre-60S
Nmd3
Arx1
pre-60S
pre-60S
Nmd3
Nmd3
Arx1
Arx1
Rei1
Rpl10
60S
Rpl10
Lsg1
GTP
Ran
GTP
Ran
GTP
Crm1
Ran
GDP
Crm1
Crm1
Nmd3
Ran
GTP
Arx1
Mex67
Mtr2
Mex67
Mex67
Mtr2
Mtr2
Lsg1
GDP
FG
FG
FG
FG
pre-60S
Arx1
Nucleus
Cytoplasm
Mex67
Mtr2
Crm1
Nmd3
Ran
GTP
subunit proteins have been implicated in 40S export,  
but it is not clear whether they are bona fide export 
adaptors
141–143
.
The mechanism of nuclear exit of 60S subunits has 
been elucidated in yeast and metazoa. These studies  
revealed that 60S subunit export is conserved and 
depends on the Ran system and the Crm1 export recep­
tor
144–149
(FIG.5)
Nmd3, a conserved NES­containing  
protein that is recruited to a late export­competent 
pre­60S particle in the nucleoplasm, serves as the adaptor 
protein
146–151
. Following export to the cytoplasm, Crm1 
is dissociated from the Nmd3 adaptor by RanGTP hydro­
lysis. Subsequently, Nmd3 is released from the 60S export 
cargo by a cytoplasmic GTPase (Lsg1), an event that is 
coupled to the loading of the ribosomal protein Rpl10 
onto the 60S subunit
151,152
.
Genetic studies in yeast recently indicated that 
Crm1 is not the sole export receptor that escorts the 
pre­60S particle through the NPC. Surprisingly, one of 
the additional export receptors for the pre­60S particle 
is Mex67–Mtr2, which uses a distinct interaction sur­
face to bind to the pre­60S subunit
153
(FIG.5)
. Thus, the 
Mex67–Mtr2 heterodimer provides a versatile molecu­
lar surface to bind to cargoes as diverse as mRNPs and  
pre­ribosomal particles.
Arx1 is another auxiliary shuttling export factor that 
is recruited to the late pre­60S particle concomitantly 
with Nmd3 and Mex67–Mtr2 
(ReFS150,154–156)
(FIG.5)
After nuclear export, Arx1 and its interacting partner 
Alb1 are released from the 60S subunit by Rei1, a cyto­
plasmic factor that operates at a terminal step during 
pre­60S biogenesis
154,155
. A recent study demonstrated 
that Arx1 has properties of shuttling transport recep­
tors, which can directly interact with FG nucleoporins
157
However, Arx1 is not related to typical nucleocytoplas­
mic transport receptors, but instead is homologous to 
Met aminopeptidases (MetAPs). It is speculated that 
Arx1, which does not have a MetAP activity, nevertheless 
uses its MetAP fold to bind to the Phe­Gly repeats of FG 
nucleoporins
157
.
Thus, pre­60S subunits, in contrast to other RNA 
classes, can recruit several different export receptors to 
make their export more efficient. Notably, 60S subunits 
belong to the largest RNA­containing particles that have 
to pass the transport channels of the NPCs. The overall 
size of a 60S subunit is in the range of the functional 
diameter of the NPC, which is ~26 nm
2
. It is conceiv­
able that the bulky pre­60S particle needs to mobilize 
several export receptors for an efficient passage through 
the NPC 
(FIG.5)
.
Figure 5 | Nuclear export of ribosomal subunits. The export of the pre-60S ribosomal subunit in yeast is shown. After a 
complicated series of assembly steps in the nucleolus, the pre-60S particle reaches the nucleoplasm and recruits several 
different classes of export receptors. The Crm1 export receptor binds in the presence of RanGTP to the nuclear export 
signal (NES)-containing adaptor Nmd3. The other export receptors Mex67–Mtr2 and Arx1 can bind directly to the pre-60S 
subunit. After translocation through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) channel, the export factors are removed from the 
pre-60S particle in the cytoplasm. Crm1 dissociates from Nmd3 upon RanGTP hydrolysis. Nmd3 is released by the Lsg1 
GTPase and is replaced by the ribosomal protein Rpl10. Arx1 might be dissociated by the release factor Rei1. The inset 
depicts a magnified version of the NPC channel and shows all export receptors that interact with both the pre-60S particle 
and FG nucleoporins. Export receptors are yellow, adaptors are blue and dissociation factors are pink.
REVIEWS
0 
|
ADvANCE ONLINE PubLICATION 
www.nature.com/reviews/molcellbio
©
2007
Nature Publishing Group 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested