mvc export to pdf : Convert multipage pdf to jpg SDK control service wpf azure asp.net dnn E8251-9035533-part513

Agilent Signal Generators Programming Guide
323
Creating and Downloading User–Data Files
User File Data (Bit/Binary) Downloads (E4438C and E8267D)
on the bit data SCPI command format, see “Downloading User Files” on page e 330 and “Command for 
Bit File Downloads” on page333.)
The following figure shows the same downloaded data from the above example as viewed in the 
signal generator’s bit file editor (see the User’s Guide for more information) and with using an 
external hex editor program.
In the bit editor, notice that the ignored bit of the bit–data is not displayed, however the hex value 
still shows all three bytes. This is because bits 1 through 7 are part of the first byte, which is shown 
as ASCII character x in the SCPI command line. The view from the hex editor program confirms that 
the downloaded three bytes of data remains unchanged. To view a downloaded bit file with an 
external hex editor program, FTP the file to your PC/UNIX workstation. For information on how to 
FTP a file, see “FTP Procedures” on page e 337.
SCPI Command 
:MEM:DATA:BIT <"file_name">,<bit_interest>,<datablock>
:MEM:DATA:BIT"3byte",23, # 1 3Z&x
0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 10 0 0
Downloaded Data:
Byte 1
Byte 2
Byte 3
Bits of interest
Ignored bit (LSB)
5A
26
78
Hex Value:
MSB
ASCII representation of the data (3 bytes)
Z
&
x
ASCII Representation:
Start block data
number of bytes
number of decimal digits
Hex values
Bit data
Designated number of bits
3 bytes of data
10 byte file header
(added by signal generator)
Designated number of bits (hex value = 23 decimal)
As Seen in a Hex Editor
:MEM:DATA:BIT "3byte",23,#13Z&x
SCPI command to download the data
As Seen in the Signal Generator’s Bit File Editor
Convert multipage pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file into jpg; c# pdf to jpg
Convert multipage pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change file from pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpeg
324
Agilent Signal Generators Programming Guide
Creating and Downloading User–Data Files
User File Data (Bit/Binary) Downloads (E4438C and E8267D)
Even though the signal generator views the downloaded data on a bit basis, it groups the data into 
bytes, and when the designated number of bits is not a multiple of 8 bits, the last byte into one or 
more 4–bit nibbles. To make the last nibble, the signal generator adds bits with a value of zero. The 
signal generator does not show the added bits in the bit editor and ignores the added bits when it 
modulates the data onto the signal, but these added bits do appear in the hex value displayed in the 
bit file editor. The following example, which uses the same three bytes of data, further demonstrates 
how the signal generator displays the data when only two bits of the last byte are part of the bits of 
interest. 
Notice that the bit file editor shows only two bytes and one nibble. In addition, the signal generator 
shows the nibble as hex value 4 instead of 7 (78 is byte 3—ASCII character x in the SCPI command 
line). This is because the signal generator sees bits 17 and 18, and assumes bits 19 and 20 are 00. As 
viewed by the signal generator, this makes the nibble 0100. Even though the signal generator 
extrapolates bits 19 and 20 to complete the nibble, it ignores these bits along with bits 21 through 
24. As seen with the hex editor program, the signal generator does not actually change the three 
bytes of data in the downloaded file.
For information on editing a file after downloading, see “Modifying User File Data” on page e 336. 
Hex value changes to 5A264
Designated bits
:MEM:DATA:BIT "3byte",18,#13Z&x
SCPI command to download the data
As Seen in the Signal Generator’s Bit File Editor
3 bytes of data
10 byte file header
(added by signal generator)
Designated number of bits (hex value = 18 decimal)
As Seen in a Hex Editor
0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 10 0 0
Downloaded Data:
Byte 1
Byte 2
Byte 3
LSB
Designated 18 bits
5A
26
78
Hex Value:
MSB
0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0
Byte 1
Byte 2
Nibble
Designated number of bits
5A
26
4
Added bits
as seen in 
the hex value
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. Turn multipage PDF file into image
convert pdf pages to jpg online; convert pdf picture to jpg
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
NET control able to batch convert PDF documents to image Create image files including all PDF contents, like Turn multipage PDF file into single image files
convert multipage pdf to jpg; .pdf to .jpg online
Agilent Signal Generators Programming Guide
325
Creating and Downloading User–Data Files
User File Data (Bit/Binary) Downloads (E4438C and E8267D)
Binary File Type Data
With the Binary file type, the signal generator sees all of the bytes within the downloaded file and 
attempts to use all of the data bits. When using this file type, the biggest challenge is creating the 
data, so that the signal generator uses all of the bits (bytes) contained within the file. This is 
referred to as using an even number of bytes. The method of creating the user file data pattern 
depends on whether you are using unframed or framed data. The following two sections illustrate the 
complexities of using the binary file format. You can eliminate these complexities by using the bit file 
format (see “Bit File Type Data” on page322).
Unframed Binary Data
When creating unframed data, you must think in terms of bits per symbol; so that your data pattern 
begins and ends on the symbol boundary, with an even number of bytes. For example, to use 16QAM 
modulation, the user file needs to contain 32 bytes:
• enough data to fill 16 states 4 times
• end on a symbol boundary
• create 64 symbols (the signal generator requires a minimum of 60 symbols for unframed data)
To do the same with 32QAM, requires a user file with 40 bytes.
When you do not use an even number of bytes, the signal generator repeats the data in the same 
symbol where the data stream ends. This means that your data would not end on the symbol 
boundary, but during a symbol. This makes it harder to identify the data content of a symbol. The 
following figure illustrates the use of an uneven number of bytes and an even number of bytes.
16QAM 4 bits/symbol:
1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 
Symbol
Symbol
Symbol
Symbol
1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 
1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1
Symbol
Symbol
Symbol
Symbol
Symbol
Symbol
Symbol
Data repeats during a symbol
1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 
Symbol
Symbol
Symbol
Symbol
Data repeats at the symbol boundary
Unframed Data
32QAM 5 bits/symbol:
Even Number of Bytes
Uneven Number of Bytes
1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 
Data pattern:
Data 
repeats
Using an uneven number of bytes makes it harder to identify the data within a symbol.
MSB
LSB
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Add multiple images to multipage PDF document in .NET WinForms. Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other bitmap images.
convert pdf file to jpg format; bulk pdf to jpg converter
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file. HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create multipage PDF from
best pdf to jpg converter; convert multiple page pdf to jpg
326
Agilent Signal Generators Programming Guide
Creating and Downloading User–Data Files
User File Data (Bit/Binary) Downloads (E4438C and E8267D)
Framed Binary Data
When using framed data, ensure that you use an even number of bytes and that the bytes contain 
enough bits to fill the data fields within a timeslot or frame. When there are not enough bits to fill 
a single timeslot or frame, the signal generator replicates the data pattern until it fills the 
timeslot/frame.
The signal generator creates successive timeslots/frames when the user file contains more bits than 
what it takes to fill a single timeslot or frame. When there are not enough bits to completely fill 
successive timeslots or frames, the signal generator truncates the data at the bit location where there 
is not enough bits remaining and repeats the data pattern. This results in a data pattern 
discontinuity. For example, a frame structure that uses 348 data bits requires a minimum file size of 
44 bytes (352 bits), but uses only 43.5 bytes (348 bits). In this situation, the signal generator 
truncates the data from bit 3 to bit 0 (bits in the last byte). Remember that the signal generator 
views the data from MSB to LSB. For this example to have an even number of bytes and enough bits 
to fill the data fields, the file needs 87 bytes (696 bits). This is enough data to fill two frames while 
maintaining the integrity of the data pattern, as illustrated in the following figure.
For information on editing a file after downloading, see “Modifying User File Data” on page e 336. 
User File Size
You download user files into non–volatile memory. For CDMA, GPS, and W–CDMA, the signal 
generator accesses the data directly from non–volatile memory, so the file size up to the maximum 
file size (shown in Table 6-6) for these formats is limited only by the amount of available 
non–volatile memory. As seen in the table, the baseband generator option does not affect these file 
sizes.
For Custom and TDMA, however, when the signal generator creates the signal, it loads the data from 
non–volatile memory into volatile memory, which is also the same memory that the signal generator 
uses for Arb–based waveforms. For user data files, volatile memory is commonly referred to as 
pattern ram memory (PRAM). Because the Custom and TDMA user files use volatile memory, their 
maximum file size depends on the baseband generator (BBG) option and the amount of available
348 data bits
Ctrl
Ctrl
110100110110...01101111
352 bits (44 bytes):
Truncated data (bits 0–3)
not enough bits remaining to fill the next frame
348 data bits
Ctrl
Ctrl
348 data bits
Ctrl
Ctrl
011101100110110101110100110110...01101111
696 bits (87 bytes):
348 data bits
Ctrl
Ctrl
Frame 1
Frame 2
Frame 1 data repeated
Frame 1
Frame 2
Even Number of Bytes
Uneven Number of Bytes 
(some data truncated)
(all bits used)
Data fills both frames (348 bits per frame) with no truncated bits
Frame 1 data
Framed Data
MSB
LSB
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file.
.net pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg
conversion pdf to jpg; bulk pdf to jpg
Agilent Signal Generators Programming Guide
327
Creating and Downloading User–Data Files
User File Data (Bit/Binary) Downloads (E4438C and E8267D)
PRAM. (Volatile memory resides on the BBG.) Table 6-6 shows the maximum file sizes by modulation 
format and baseband generator option.
For more information on signal generator memory, see “Signal Generator Memory” on page315. To 
determine how much memory is remaining in non–volatile and volatile memory, see “Checking 
Available Memory” on page319.
Determining Memory Usage for Custom and TDMA User File Data
For Custom and TDMA user files, the signal generator uses both non–volatile and volatile 
(PRAM/waveform) memory: you download the user file to non–volatile memory. To determine if there 
is enough non–volatile memory, check the available non–volatile memory and compare it to the size 
of the file to be downloaded. 
After you select a user file and turn the format on, the signal generator loads the file into volatile 
memory for processing:
• It translates each data bit into a 32–bit word (4 bytes).
The 32–bit words are not saved to the original file that resides in non–volatile memory.
• It creates an expanded data file named AUTOGEN_PRAM_1 in volatile memory while also 
maintaining a copy of the original file in volatile memory. It is the AUTOGEN_PRAM_1 file that 
contains the 32–bit words and accounts for most of the user file PRAM memory space.
• If the transmission is using unframed data and there are not enough bits in the data file to create 
60 symbols, the signal generator replicates the data pattern until there is enough data for 60 
symbols. For example, GSM uses 1 bit per symbol. If the user file contains only 24 bits, enough 
for 24 symbols, the signal generator replicates the data pattern two more times to create a file 
with 72 bits. The expanded AUTOGEN_PRAM_1 file size would show 288 bytes (72 bits 4 
bytes/bit).
Use the following procedures to calculate the required amount of volatile memory for both framed 
and unframed TDMA signals:
• “Calculating Volatile Memory (PRAM) Usage for Unframed Data” on page328
• “Calculating Volatile Memory (PRAM) Usage for Framed Data” on page e 328
Table6-6 Maximum User File Size
Modulation 
Format
Baseband Generator Option
001, 601
002
602
Custom
a
TDMA
a
a.File size with no other files residing in volatile memory.
800 kB
3.2 MB
6.4 MB
CDMA
b
GPS
b
W–CDMA
b
b.File size is not affected by the BBG option.
10 kB
10 kB
10 kB
328
Agilent Signal Generators Programming Guide
Creating and Downloading User–Data Files
User File Data (Bit/Binary) Downloads (E4438C and E8267D)
Calculating Volatile Memory (PRAM) Usage for Unframed Data
Use this procedure to calculate the memory size for either a bit or binary file. To properly 
demonstrate this process, the procedure employs a user file that contains 70 bytes (560 bits), with 
the bit file using only 557 bits.
1. Determine the AUTOGEN_PRAM_1 file size:
The signal generator creates a 32–bit word for each user file bit (1 bit equals 4 bytes).
Binary file  
4 bytes  (70 bytes x 8 bits) = 2240 bytes
Bit file  
4 bytes  557 bits= 2228 bytes
2. Calculate the number of memory blocks that the AUTOGEN_PRAM_1 file will occupy:
Volatile memory allocates memory in blocks of 1024 bytes.
Binary file  
2240 / 1024 = 2.188 blocks
Bit file  
2228 / 1024 = 2.176 blocks
3. Round the memory block value to the next highest integer value.
For this example, the AUTOGEN_PRAM_1 file will use three blocks of memory for a total of 3072 
bytes.
4. Determine the number of memory blocks that the copy of the original file occupies in volatile 
memory.
For this example the bit and binary file sizes are shown in the following list:
• Binary file = 70 bytes < 1024 bytes = 1 memory block
• Bit file = 80 bytes < 1024 bytes = 1 memory block
Remember that a bit file includes a 10–byte file header.
5. Calculate the total volatile memory occupied by the user file data:
Calculating Volatile Memory (PRAM) Usage for Framed Data
Framed data is not a selection for Custom, but it is for TDMA formats. To frame data, the signal 
generator adds framing overhead data such as tail bits, guard bits, and sync bits. These framing bits 
are in addition to the user file data. For more information on framed data, see “Understanding 
Framed Transmission For Real–Time TDMA” on page339.
When using framed data, the signal generator views the data (framing and user file bits) in terms of 
the number of bits per frame, even if only one timeslot within a frame is active. This means that the 
signal generator creates a 32–bit word for each bit in a frame, for both active and inactive timeslots.
You can create a user file so that it fills a timeslot once or multiple times. When the user file fills a 
timeslot multiple times, the signal generator creates the same number of frames as the number of 
timeslots that the user file fills. For example, if a file contains enough data to fill a timeslot three 
times, the signal produces three new frames before the frames repeat. Each new frame increases the 
AUTOGEN_PRAM_1
Original File
3 blocks
1 block
1024 (3 + 1) = 4096 bytes
Agilent Signal Generators Programming Guide
329
Creating and Downloading User–Data Files
User File Data (Bit/Binary) Downloads (E4438C and E8267D)
AUTOGEN_PRAM_1 file size. If you select different user files for the timeslots within a frame, the 
user file that produces the largest number of frames determines the size of the AUTOGEN_PRAM_1 
file.
Use this procedure to calculate the volatile memory usage for a GSM signal with two active timeslots 
and two user binary files. One user file, 57 bytes, is for a normal timeslot and another, 37 bytes, is 
for a custom timeslot. 
1. Determine the total number of bits per timeslot.
A GSM timeslot consists of 156.25 bits (control and payload data).
2. Calculate the number of bits per frame.
A GSM frame consists of 8 timeslots: 8  156.25 = 1250 bits per frame
3. Determine how many bytes it takes to produce one frame in the signal generator:
The signal generator creates a 32–bit word for each bit in the frame (1 bit equals 4 bytes).
4 x 1250 = 5000 bytes
Each GSM frame uses 5000 bytes of PRAM memory.
4. Analyze how many timeslots the user file data will fill.
A normal GSM timeslot (TS) uses 114 payload data bits, and a custom timeslot uses 148 payload 
data bits. The user file (payload data) for the normal timeslot contains 57 bytes (456 bits) and the 
user file for the custom timeslot contains 37 bytes (296 bits). 
Normal TS
456 / 114 = 4 timeslots
Custom TS 
296 / 148 = 2 timeslots
NOTE
Because there is an even number of bytes, either a bit or binary file works in this scenario. 
If there was an uneven number of bytes, a bit file would be the best choice to avoid data 
discontinuity.
5. Compute the number of frames that the signal generator will generate.
There is enough user file data for four normal timeslots and two custom timeslots, so the signal 
generator will generate four frames of data.
6. Calculate the AUTOGEN_PRAM_1 file size:
7. Calculate the number of memory blocks that the AUTOGEN_PRAM_1 file will occupy:
Volatile memory allocates memory in blocks of 1024 bytes.
20000 / 1024 = 19.5 blocks
Number of Frames s Bytes per Frame
4
5000
4 x 5000 = 20000 bytes
330
Agilent Signal Generators Programming Guide
Creating and Downloading User–Data Files
User File Data (Bit/Binary) Downloads (E4438C and E8267D)
8. Round the memory block value up to the next highest integer value.
For this example, the AUTOGEN_PRAM_1 file will use 20 blocks of memory for a total of 20480 
bytes.
9. Determine the number of memory blocks that the original files occupy in volatile memory.
The files do not share memory blocks, so you must determine how many memory blocks each file 
occupies.
NOTE
If the user file type is bit, remember to include the 10–byte file header in the file size. 
10.Calculate the total volatile memory occupied by the AUTOGEN_PRAM_1 file and the user files:
Downloading User Files
The signal generator expects bit and binary file type data to be downloaded as block data (binary 
data in bytes). The IEEE standard 488.2–1992 section 7.7.6 defines block data.
This section contains two examples to explain how to format the SCPI command for downloading 
user file data. The examples use the binary user file SCPI command, however the concept is the same 
for the bit file SCPI command:
• Command Format
• “Command Format in a Program Routine” on page e 331
Command Format
This example conceptually describes how to format a data download command (#ABC represents the 
block data):
:MEM:DATA <"file_name">,#ABC
<"file_name">  the data file path and name
#  
indicates the start of the block data
A  
the number of decimal digits present in B
B  
a decimal number specifying the number of data bytes to follow in C
Normal TS
Custom TS
57 bytes = 1 block
37 bytes = 1 block
1 + 1 = 2 memory blocks
AUTOGEN_PRAM_1
User Files
20 blocks
2 blocks
1024 (20 + 2) = 22528 bytes
Agilent Signal Generators Programming Guide
331
Creating and Downloading User–Data Files
User File Data (Bit/Binary) Downloads (E4438C and E8267D)
C  
the file data in bytes
bin:  
the location of the file within the signal generator file system
my_file  
the data file name as it will appear in the signal generator’s memory 
catalog
#  
indicates the start of the block data
3  
B has three decimal digits
240  
240 bytes (1,920 bits) of data to follow in C
12%S!4&07#8g*Y9@7...  the ASCII representation of some of the block data (binary data) 
downloaded to the signal generator, however not all ASCII values are 
printable
In actual use, the block data is not part of the command line as shown above, but instead resides in 
a binary file on the PC/UNIX. When the program executes the SCPI command, the command line 
notifies the signal generator that it is going to receive block data of the stated size and to place the 
file in the signal generator file directory with the indicated name. Immediately following the 
command execution, the program downloads the binary file to the signal generator. This is shown in 
the following section, “Command Format in a Program Routine”
Some commands are file location specific and do not require the file location as part of the file 
name. An example of this is the bit file SCPI command shown in “Command for Bit File Downloads” 
on page333.
Command Format in a Program Routine
This section demonstrates the use of the download SCPI command within the confines of a C++ 
program routine. The following code sends the SCPI command and downloads user file data to the 
signal generator’s Binary memory catalog (directory).
Line
Code—Download User File Data
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
int bytesToSend;
bytesToSend = numsamples;
char s[20];
char cmd[200];
sprintf(s, "%d", bytesToSend);
sprintf(cmd, ":MEM:DATA \"BIN:FILE1\", #%d%d", strlen(s), bytesToSend);
iwrite(id, cmd, strlen(cmd), 0, 0);
iwrite(id, databuffer, bytesToSend, 0, 0);
iwrite(id, "\n", 1, 1, 0);
file_name
A
C
:MEM:DATA “bin:my_file”,#324012%S!4&07#8g*Y9@7...
B
file location
332
Agilent Signal Generators Programming Guide
Creating and Downloading User–Data Files
User File Data (Bit/Binary) Downloads (E4438C and E8267D)
Line
Code Description—Download User File Data
1
Define an integer variable (bytesToSend) to store the number of bytes to send to the signal 
generator.
2
Calculate the total number of bytes, and store the value in the integer variable defined in line 1.
3
Create a string large enough to hold the bytesToSend value as characters. In this code, string s 
is set to 20 bytes (20 characters—one character equals one byte)
4
Create a string and set its length (cmd[200] ) to hold the SCPI command syntax and 
parameters. In this code, we define the string length as 200 bytes (200 characters).
5
Store the value of bytesToSend in string s. For example, if bytesToSend = 2000; s = ”2000”.
sprintf() is a standard function in C++, which writes string data to a string variable.
6
Store the SCPI command syntax and parameters in the string cmd. The SCPI command prepares 
the signal generator to accept the data.
strlen() is a standard function in C++, which returns length of a string.
If bytesToSend = 2000, then s = “2000”, strlen(s) = 4, so 
cmd = :MEM:DATA ”BIN:FILE1\” #42000.
7
Send the SCPI command stored in the string cmd to the signal generator contained in the 
variable id.
iwrite() is a SICL function in Agilent IO library, which writes the data (block data) specified 
in the string cmd to the signal generator.
The third argument of iwrite(), strlen(cmd), informs the signal generator of the number of 
bytes in the command string. The signal generator parses the string to determine the 
number of data bytes it expects to receive.
The fourth argument of iwrite(), 0, means there is no END of file indicator for the string. 
This lets the session remain open, so the program can download the user file data. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested