mvc export to pdf : Batch pdf to jpg online control software system web page windows winforms console ecbocp1041-part538

10
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
starting level, with the by far lowest GDP per 
capita among oil exporters. Average growth was 
low in Russia
7
and Saudi Arabia, at 1.8% and 
2% respectively. In the case of Russia, this 
refl ects, in particular, the deep recession at the 
beginning of the economic transition in the early 
1990s and, to a lesser extent, the fi nancial crisis 
of 1998. Saudi Arabia faced a deep recession 
from 1982 to 1985 following the sharp drop in 
oil prices in the fi rst half of the 1980s, and 
growth remained sluggish until the rise in oil 
prices after 2003, apart from a few exceptional 
years like 1990-91. Algeria has a somewhat 
better average annual growth at 2.9%, although 
it was hampered by, among other things, 
political unrest after 1992. Oil-exporting 
countries in general and the four countries under 
consideration in particular are also characterised 
by a relatively volatile growth performance, 
with Nigeria and Saudi Arabia being the most 
volatile. However, since the oil price rise starting 
in 2003, all four countries have had relatively 
stable real GDP growth at elevated levels, 
comparable to those in other emerging market 
economies.
In terms of GDP per capita, oil-exporting 
countries exhibit higher levels (Chart 2), but 
lower and less steady growth than emerging 
market economies. GDP per capita was stagnant 
or even falling in the late 1980s and 1990s, 
refl ecting a combination of low oil prices, 
high population growth (Algeria, Nigeria and 
Saudi Arabia) and economic crisis (Russia). 
This trend was reversed only at the beginning 
of this decade with high and rising oil prices. 
Russia in particular shows an accelerated and 
above average pace of GDP per capita growth, 
supported by steady population decline, unlike 
other oil exporters and emerging market 
economies.
Data for Russia before 1992 are data for the Soviet Union.
Chart 2 GDP per capita
(USD; PPP terms)
0
5,000
10,000
15,000
20,000
25,000
0
5,000
10,000
15,000
20,000
25,000
Algeria
Nigeria
Saudi Arabia
Russia
oil exporters average
EMEs
198019831986198919921995
200120042007
1998
Source: IMF.
Notes: Averages weighted by GDP in PPP terms. 2008: projections.
Chart 1 Real GDP growth
(annual percentage changes)
-20
-10
0
10
20
30
-20
-10
0
10
20
30
1981 1985 1989 1993 1997
2001 2005
Algeria
Russia
Nigeria
oil exporters average
Saudi Arabia
EMEs
Source: IMF.
Notes: Averages weighted by GDP in PPP terms. 2008: projections.
Batch pdf to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpg for online; convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg
Batch pdf to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change pdf to jpg on; convert pdf photo to jpg
11
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 ECONOMIC AND
FISCAL PERFORMANCE
IN SELECTED
OIL-EXPORTING 
COUNTRIES
Box 1
A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE
After the fi rst oil price shocks in the 1970s,
economists sought a better understanding of the 
impact of growing revenue infl ows on oil exporters’ economies (Mabro and Monroe (1974), Neary 
2
There are four main explanations of the resource curse: the Dutch disease hypothesis; reduced 
incentives to develop the non-resource part of the economy; high volatility of resource revenues; 
and political economy effects of resource income, in particular with regard to institutional quality.
(i)
the combined infl 
goods and infl 
oil exporters did not show a signifi cant shift of labour and capital away from manufacturing 
through which resource revenues could harm economic growth. 
(ii)
accumulate private capital (Buffi e (1993), Stevens (2003)). The concentration of resource 
fi cult decisions 
reduce investment effi ciency, cumulate economic distortions and retard diversifi cation 
(Auty and Gelb (2001)). 
(iii)
and Mikesell (1997) identifi ed higher degrees of trade volatility in regions with high shares of 
2 r a 
owing 
ity in 
countries with low degree of openness to trade.
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
best program to convert pdf to jpg; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
speed JPEG to GIF Converter, faster than other JPG Converters; when you convert the files in batch; Storing conversion so the user who is not online still can
change pdf into jpg; c# pdf to jpg
12
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
CURRENT ACCOUNT BALANCES
Current account balances of oil exporters exhibit 
a higher volatility than those of emerging market 
economies due to oil price movements, and in 
times of high oil prices show high surpluses 
(Chart 3). The latter has been particularly 
pronounced since the beginning of this decade. 
While emerging markets on average have had 
gradually rising current account surpluses 
since 2000, refl ecting developments in Asia 
in particular, oil exporters’ surpluses initially 
surged and then remained at high levels. 
Country-specifi c developments are notable. 
Nigeria’s and Saudi Arabia’s current accounts are 
subject to particularly strong fl uctuations, with 
the implementation of a balanced fi scal policy, thus retarding economic growth. 
fi 
3
(iv)
rents can be a source of confl ict, political instability, corruption, weak institutions, inequitable 
fi cials, fi ght 
signifi 
fi rst study 
fi scal policies. 
fl uence activities 
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Open JPEG to DICOM Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "DICOM" in
bulk pdf to jpg; changing pdf file to jpg
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Ability to preserve original images without any affecting; Ability to convert image swiftly between JPG & JBIG2 in single and batch mode;
change from pdf to jpg on; convert pdf to gif or jpg
13
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 ECONOMIC AND
FISCAL PERFORMANCE
IN SELECTED
OIL-EXPORTING 
COUNTRIES
sometimes large defi cits in the 1980s and 1990s. 
This is explained by their particularly high 
dependency on oil exports, which since 1980 
have averaged well above 80% of total exports 
of goods and services (compared to an average 
of 56% for the top ten oil exporters). Russia’s 
current account balance is less volatile, refl ecting 
the fact that since 1980 oil exports have averaged 
only 34% of total exports. Recently this value 
has been much higher, at well above 40%, and 
the lower average value since 1980 is due partly 
to low oil prices in the 1990s and partly to the 
slump in oil production following the collapse 
of the Soviet Union. Algeria’s current account 
is also more volatile than in emerging market 
economies in general (but somewhat less than 
in other oil exporters). In the mid-1990s the 
civil war in Algeria also had a noticeable impact 
as the current account displayed defi cits in 
several years. 
Over the past few years, current account 
surpluses have been particularly high in Middle 
Eastern and North African oil exporters like 
Saudi Arabia and Algeria, while Russia’s surplus 
has been much lower and declining over the past 
two years. While import growth is buoyant in all 
oil-exporting countries, albeit masked in some 
cases by even faster growing revenues and thus 
high current account surpluses, Russia’s import 
growth has been particularly strong due to strong 
economic activity and possibly also owing to a 
somewhat more fl exible exchange rate policy 
than, for example, in Saudi Arabia that allowed 
for a limited appreciation of the Russian rouble 
(see sub-section 3.2.2).
INFLATION
Over the longer term oil-exporting countries 
have had a signifi cantly better record on infl ation 
than emerging market economies in general 
(Chart 4). Their infl ation was much lower during 
the 1980s, when many emerging market 
economies faced high infl ation rates, and – 
if one excludes the specifi c case of Russia
8
– 
Russia suffered extremely high infl ation in the early 1990s 
which, given Russia’s relatively high weight in the average 
fi gure, would distort the overall picture of infl ation developments 
in oil-exporting countries.
Chart 3 Current account balance
(percentage of GDP)
-20
-10
0
10
20
30
40
-20
-10
0
10
20
30
40
Algeria
Nigeria
Saudi Arabia
Russia
oil exporters average
EMEs
1980198319861989199219951998
20042007
2001
Source: IMF.
Notes: Averages weighted by GDP in PPP terms. 2008: projections.
Chart 4 Inflation
(annual percentage changes)
-10
10
30
50
70
90
110
130
150
-10
10
30
50
70
90
110
130
150
Russia:  840% in 1993
215% in 1994 
19811984 1987 199019931996199920022005 2008
Algeria
Nigeria
Russia
Saudi Arabia
oil exporters average, excluding Russia
EMEs
Source: IMF.
Notes: Averages weighted by GDP in PPP terms. 2008: projections.
JPG to Word Converter | Convert JPEG to Word, Convert Word to JPG
Open JPEG to Word Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "Word" in
convert pdf pictures to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter
JPG to JPEG2000 Converter | Convert JPEG to JPEG2000, Convert
Open JPEG to JPEG2000 Converter first; ad JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JPEG2000" in
.pdf to .jpg online; .net pdf to jpg
14
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
were also lower during the 1990s. Russia, like 
other transition economies, saw a burst of 
infl ation at the beginning of the transition 
process after the liberalisation of prices and 
again after the fi nancial crisis of 1998, since 
when it has seen protracted disinfl ation. Nigeria 
is another oil exporter with high and volatile 
infl ation. This contrasts with low and relatively 
stable infl ation in Saudi Arabia (and other oil 
exporters on the Arabian Peninsula).
The relatively stable infl ation performance of 
oil exporters over the long run, compared to 
emerging markets in general, may be explained 
by the lower degree of fi scal dominance of 
monetary policy – frequently a root cause of 
high infl ation in emerging and developing 
economies. Given the signifi cantly higher level 
of public revenue as a result of income from oil 
(see Chart 7 in sub-section 2), oil exporters can 
fi nance higher public expenditure without 
incurring budget defi cits. Moreover, as many 
oil-exporting countries have accumulated 
fi nancial assets on which they can draw to 
temporarily fi nance budget defi cits, the 
inclination to resort to monetary fi nancing of 
budget defi cits is lower.
9
Another factor that has 
contributed to relatively low infl ation in a
long-term perspective, is exchange rate regimes. 
Most oil-exporting countries – in particular in 
the Gulf region – have pegs or tightly managed 
fl oats to the US dollar, and have thus “imported” 
monetary discipline and credibility. 
Since the beginning of the current decade, 
however, average infl ation of oil exporters has 
exceeded the average for emerging market 
and developing countries, refl ecting improved 
infl ation performance among the latter and, in 
the wake of high oil prices, mounting infl ationary 
pressure in all major oil-exporting countries – 
including the four under consideration here. As 
a result of the exchange rate regimes, monetary 
conditions have been relatively loose and 
monetary policy has been constrained in curbing 
infl ationary pressure, placing a particular burden 
on fi scal policy to maintain macroeconomic 
stability (see sub-section 3.2 for a more detailed 
discussion of recent policy challenges).
2.2 FISCAL PERFORMANCE
GENERAL GOVERNMENT BALANCE-TO-GDP RATIO
The general government balance-to-GDP ratio 
of the four countries under review has been 
highly volatile and has improved dramatically 
since the turn of the century. Oil prices have 
been the key driver of their fi scal performance
(Chart 5). While emerging and developing 
countries have also seen an improvement of 
their fi scal balances over the last decade, oil 
exporters have outperformed them, exhibiting – 
sometimes large – surpluses, thanks to rising 
oil prices. However, some events not related 
to oil prices have had an impact on long-
term budget performance. The collapse of the 
Soviet Union in the early 1990s was followed 
by a long period of transition, during which 
fi scal performance was poor. Thus, Russia’s 
general government balance-to-GDP ratio 
A particularly striking example is Kuwait, which following the 
Iraqi invasion in 1990 could refi nance the re-construction of 
the country by drawing on its reserve fund. Public debt, which 
had spiked to 200% of GDP in 1991, was reduced rapidly 
(to 35% of GDP only ten years later, in 2001).
Chart 5 General government balance
(percentage of GDP)
-20
-10
0
10
20
30
40
-20
-10
0
10
20
30
40
1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008
Algeria 1)
Nigeria
Saudi Arabia
Russia
oil exporters average
EMEs
Source: IMF.
Notes: Averages weighted by GDP in PPP terms. 2008: projections. 
1) Central government balance.
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "PNG" in "Output
convert pdf file to jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
VB.NET > Convert PDF to Image. "This online guide content end users to convert PDF and PDF/A documents used commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap
convert online pdf to jpg; .pdf to .jpg converter online
15
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 ECONOMIC AND
FISCAL PERFORMANCE
IN SELECTED
OIL-EXPORTING 
COUNTRIES
was deeply and steadily negative until 1999. 
More surprisingly, Algeria’s public fi nances 
were not as affected as might have been expected 
in the period of civil war (1992-99).
10
Nigeria’s 
fi scal performance has been highly volatile, also 
due to the political environment. For instance, 
a dramatic deterioration was observed in 1998 
when Nigeria’s ruler was overthrown. In 
recent years too, Nigeria’s budget performance 
has remained more volatile than in other
oil-exporting countries. This is largely due to 
the confl icts in some oil-rich regions (Niger 
Delta), which disrupt oil production. In Saudi 
Arabia, the fi scal outcome has closely mirrored 
the average of oil exporters, although since the 
turn of the century the budget surplus has been 
much higher than the average. 
PUBLIC DEBT-TO-GDP RATIO
The average gross public debt-to-GDP ratio of 
major oil-exporting countries reached almost 
80% in the late 1990s. This increase refl ected, 
among other things, diffi culties in reining in 
relatively high expenditure when oil prices fell 
after earlier oil price booms, in particular in the 
1990s. Since the beginning of this decade, 
however, public debt has plummeted in the 
wake of rising oil prices (Chart 6). Oil exporters 
used windfall revenues to signifi cantly and 
rapidly reduce their – in some cases very high – 
public debt, and fi scal vulnerabilities have 
receded. Public indebtedness peaked in the late 
1990s, except in Algeria where the decline 
started in the mid-1990s from a very high level 
(120% of GDP). In the late 1990s Russia was 
also highly indebted (around 100% of GDP in 
1999) following the fi nancial crisis of 1998. The 
increase in oil prices in recent years enabled 
Russia to sign an agreement with the Paris Club 
on the early repayment of all its external debt of 
USD 22 billion.
11
In Nigeria the decline in public 
debt was not mainly the result of high oil 
revenues but of a debt rescheduling.
12
Owing to 
its oil wealth, Nigeria was not included in the 
list of highly indebted poor countries (HIPCs) 
eligible for 100% debt relief from offi cial 
lenders, the IMF and the World Bank, but 
Nigeria’s public debt was rescheduled by the 
Paris Club in 2005 with a 60% write-off, 
reducing public debt abruptly from USD 30 
billion to USD 12 billion. 
GOVERNMENT REVENUE
General government revenue (as a share of 
GDP) of oil-exporting countries is higher and 
more cyclical than in emerging and developing 
countries due to the importance and volatility 
of oil revenues (Chart 7). Government revenues 
increased from around 30% of GDP on average 
at the end-1990s to above 40% recently in 
the wake of rising oil prices, despite the 
concomitant sharp rise in nominal GDP, which 
raised the denominator of the revenue-to-GDP 
ratio. Among oil-exporting countries, Nigeria 
distinguishes itself by having the highest 
fl uctuations, while Russia and Algeria mirror 
This may be explained by the fact that the civil unrest and 
10 
terrorist activities took place mainly in the northern part of the 
country where the bulk of the population is located, which is far 
from the Saharan desert where oil is extracted (e.g. the city of 
Hassi Messaoud).
This operation represented the largest repayment ever made 
11 
to the Paris Club creditors. Under the previous rescheduling 
agreements of 1996 and 1999, debt to the Paris Club creditors 
was to be repaid between 2006 and 2020.
The opacity of fi scal data for Nigeria before 2003 makes 
12 
an assessment of public debt diffi cult. Fiscal analysis was 
complicated by a multiplicity of off-budget funds. Therefore the 
public debt data for Nigeria indicated in Chart 6 start from 2003.
Chart 6 General government gross debt
(percentage of GDP)
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
Algeria 1)
Nigeria
Saudi Arabia
Russia 1)
oil exporters average
1994
1992
1998
1996
2002
2000
2006 2008
2004
Sources: Haver Analytics and IMF.
Notes: Averages weighted by GDP in PPP terms. 2008: projections. 
1) Central government debt.
16
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
the average for oil exporters. The sharp and 
steady increase in oil prices in recent years until 
mid-2008 did not have a noticeable impact on 
Nigeria’s public revenues as a percentage of 
GDP, in part due to production problems and 
unrest in the Niger Delta region. Relatively 
strong economic growth in 2002 also drove the 
revenue-to-GDP ratio down. By contrast, in 
Saudi Arabia general government revenue as a 
share of GDP has increased sharply since 2002, 
and has remained well above the average for oil 
exporters. This is due in part to oil production 
increases. Saudi Arabia is the country with by 
far the largest spare capacity and, unlike other 
oil exporters, could therefore signifi cantly 
raise production when prices were rising, thus 
benefi ting both from higher oil prices and 
increased production. It is also due in part to 
somewhat more moderate economic growth 
compared to other oil exporters, so the increase 
in the denominator of the revenue-to-GDP ratio 
was less pronounced. 
GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURE
General government expenditure has stood at 
above 30% of GDP since the turn of the century, 
which is somewhat higher than in emerging and 
developing countries on average (Chart 8). Thus 
the increase in oil prices in recent years until 
mid-2008 did not translate into a noticeable 
increase in public expenditure as a share 
of GDP, notwithstanding signifi cant fi scal 
expansion (see sub-section 3.2.1). This is due to 
the substantial nominal GDP increases in recent 
years. The higher average expenditure level
in the early 1990s was driven by the collapse 
of the former Soviet Union, followed by a 
deeply negative real GDP growth rate in Russia
(-15% in 1992, see Chart 1), which sharply 
increased expenditure as a share of GDP. The high 
volatility of Nigeria’s expenditure-to-GDP ratio 
refl ects sharp fl uctuations in output and revenue
(see above).
Chart 7 General government revenue
(percentage of GDP)
10
20
30
40
50
60
10
20
30
40
50
60
Algeria 1)
Nigeria
Saudi Arabia
1992 1994 1996
2000 2002 2004 2006 6 2008
1998
Russia
oil exporters
EMEs
Source: IMF.
Notes: Averages weighted by GDP in PPP terms. 2008: projections.
1) Central government revenue.
Chart 8 General government expenditure
(percentage of GDP)
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
Algeria 1)
Nigeria
Saudi Arabia
Russia
oil exporters
EMEs
1992 1994 1996 6 1998 2000 0 2002 2004 4 2006 6 2008
Source: IMF.
Notes: Averages weighted by GDP in PPP terms. 2008: projections. 
Includes net lending.
1) Central government expenditure.
17
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 KEY FISCAL POLICY 
CHALLENGES STEMMING 
FROM HYDROCARBON 
DEPENDENCE
KEY FISCAL POLICY CHALLENGES STEMMING 
FROM HYDROCARBON DEPENDENCE
Sub-section 1 of this section briefl y reviews 
the fi scal challenges that are common to 
hydrocarbon-dependent (and in fact all 
commodity-centred) economies, irrespective of 
the level and direction of movement of prices. 
Sub-section 2 discusses in more detail the policy 
issues that have emerged in the wake of high 
and rising oil prices since the beginning of the 
decade until mid-2008, and briefl y touches on 
the change of perspective in view of the sharp 
turnaround in oil prices since then.
3.1 GENERAL CHALLENGES
Fiscal policy in oil-exporting countries faces 
specifi c challenges related to the fact that oil 
revenues are exhaustible, volatile, uncertain 
and largely originate from abroad.
13
The 
challenges tend to be greater the larger the 
share of oil revenues is in the government’s 
overall revenues and the larger the oil sector is 
in the economy. The specifi c features of oil 
revenues pose challenges in both the long and 
the short term – intergenerational equity and 
fi scal sustainability in the long term, and 
macroeconomic management and fi scal 
planning in the short term. 
3.1.1 LONG-TERM ISSUES: INTERGENERATIONAL 
EQUITY AND FISCAL SUSTAINABILITY
In the long term the challenge stems from the 
exhaustibility of oil reserves and concerns the 
issues of fi scal sustainability and intergenerational 
resource allocation.
14
The principal policy 
options to address these challenges are to save 
oil revenues in order to accumulate fi nancial 
assets or to invest in physical assets (i.e. use 
them for capital expenditure). To avoid a sharp 
adjustment of fi scal policy once oil reserves are 
exhausted, and to secure national wealth 
15
for 
future generations, one option for oil-exporting 
countries is to accumulate fi nancial assets during 
the periods in which they produce oil. After the 
end of oil production, the revenues from these 
assets can be used to replace oil income and to 
maintain levels of expenditure. Oil wealth is 
thus gradually transformed into fi nancial wealth, 
leaving the country’s overall wealth unchanged 
and preserving it for future generations. Charts 9 
and 10 illustrate – based on this reasoning and 
using highly simplifi ed assumptions – how the 
stock of national wealth is preserved for future 
generations and how the sustainability of fi scal 
revenues is maintained. 
See Barnett and Ossowski (2002). The following considerations 
13 
are mainly based on their comprehensive overview and analysis 
of operational aspects of fi scal policy in oil-exporting countries. 
See also Medas and Zakharova (2009), who further develop the 
topic.
14 
amount of public goods (level of expenditure) can be provided 
as in the “oil age” without resorting to defi cit fi nancing of 
public expenditure. Intergenerational equity requires citizens in 
the “post-oil age” to enjoy the same amount of public goods as 
the generation in the “oil age” without bearing a higher fi scal 
burden (e.g. in the form of taxation). This implies that achieving 
intergenerational equity is more demanding than ensuring fi scal 
sustainability. If oil revenues are replaced by tax revenues, 
this would ensure fi scal sustainability but not necessarily 
intergenerational equity.
It is assumed that oil and gas are publicly owned and revenues 
15 
from their extraction accrue to the government, which is the case 
in most oil-exporting countries.
Chart 9 Preserving national wealth through 
financial asset accumulation
Year
oil wealth
financial 
wealth
0
(start of oil production)
10
(depletion of 
oil reserves)
1,000
total wealth
National
wealth,
USD
Assumptions: Ten years oil production, constant production of ten 
barrels p.a., constant price of USD 10 per barrel, i.e. constant oil 
revenue of USD 100 p.a.
18
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
Intuitively, this reasoning is straightforward and 
makes a strong case for persistent overall fi scal 
surpluses to accumulate fi nancial assets.
16
However, deriving concrete policy conclusions 
from theory, making them operational and, even 
more so, implementing them is challenging. For 
example, estimating the oil wealth of a country, 
defi ned as the present discounted value of future 
oil revenues, is surrounded by signifi cant 
uncertainty 
regarding 
the 
underlying 
assumptions. There is uncertainty about the 
future path of oil prices, about oil reserves, and 
about the costs of extracting them. For example, 
in the long run, an extreme case to be considered 
could be technical innovations largely replacing 
oil as a primary energy source, or signifi cantly 
enhancing effi ciency in the use of oil, which 
would greatly reduce the value of oil reserves or 
even make them obsolete. Given such 
uncertainties, prudence in the design of fi scal 
policies is deemed important, in particular from 
the point of view of long-term considerations.
17
In principle, capital expenditure and the 
accumulation of physical assets could represent 
an alternative to the accumulation of fi nancial 
assets in preserving national wealth for future 
generations and ensuring fi scal sustainability. 
This would reduce the need for persistent fi scal 
surpluses and thus allow more expansionary 
policies. In particular, investment in physical 
infrastructure and in social infrastructure, 
e.g. education and health, is generally seen as 
benefi cial in this regard, as such expenditure can 
be conducive to diversifying the economy away 
from hydrocarbons, developing the private 
non-oil sector and thus also creating a basis for 
generating tax revenues.
18
The question of 
whether to save oil revenues and accumulate 
fi nancial assets or to spend them on productive 
investment boils down to the respective rates of 
return on the alternative uses and on their 
relative volatility.
19
While the rates of return on 
(usually foreign) fi nancial assets depend on the 
type of investment and conditions in global 
fi nancial markets, rates of return on (domestic) 
capital expenditure are much harder to identify, 
more uncertain and tend to depend on various 
country-specifi c factors.
20
Among other factors, 
such as the stock and quality of existing public 
capital and thus the marginal return on additional 
investment, governance and, in particular, levels 
See Alier and Kaufman (1999), who, based on an extension of 
16 
the non-stochastic overlapping generation model, make the case 
for persistent fi scal surpluses in an economy with non-renewable 
resources on intergenerational equity grounds.
See, for instance, Bjerkholt (2003), who suggests a conservative 
17 
approach to fi scal policy (the “bird-in-the-hand” rule) to 
counter the uncertainty of a country’s oil wealth by limiting 
non-oil defi cits to the return on accumulated assets. Chart 10 
illustrates this approach. Norway’s fi scal rule comes closest 
to implementing it in an oil-exporting country (see Section 4). 
A somewhat less conservative approach is the so-called 
permanent consumption rule (see Balassone, Takizawa and 
Zebregs (2006)). According to this approach, the optimal 
non-oil defi cit is equal to the return on the present discounted 
value of oil wealth (which is less than the annual fl ow of 
oil revenues, i.e. also in this case fi nancial assets need to be 
accumulated). The “bird-in-the-hand” rule has the advantage 
that it does not require estimates of oil wealth. The permanent 
consumption rule has the advantage that it allows for some 
“frontloading” of public expenditure, which may be more 
appropriate for countries with large development needs, e.g. in 
infrastructure.
For attempts, progress and rationale for economic diversifi cation 
18 
in GCC economies, see Sturm et al (2008).
If oil revenues were spent on productive investment rather 
19 
than saved, in Chart 10 revenues from fi nancial assets could be 
replaced by tax (or other public) revenues.
Empirical studies fi nd that the marginal product of public capital 
20 
can be much higher than that of private capital, roughly equal to 
that of private capital, well below that of private capital or in some 
cases even negative. See Romp and de Haan (2007) for a recent 
review of the literature on public capital and economic growth.
Chart 10 Maintaining fiscal revenue 
sustainability through financial asset 
accumulation
Yea r
100 
oil revenues
financial revenues
total revenues
Revenue,
USD
sustainable 
expenditure/
non-oil deficit
10 
(depletion of 
oil reserves)
0
(start of oil 
production) 
Assumptions: The same as in Chart 9; in addition, a return  of 
10% p.a. on fi nancial assets is assumed.
19
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 KEY FISCAL POLICY 
CHALLENGES STEMMING 
FROM HYDROCARBON 
DEPENDENCE
of corruption have been identifi ed as factors 
determining the productivity of public 
investment and its impact on economic growth.
21
Indeed, analysis of the effects of public capital 
expenditure on non-oil real GDP growth and 
private investment in the four countries under 
closer consideration in this paper suggests that 
the impact varies from country to country and 
that public investment may not always yield the 
desired positive effects (Box 2).
See for example Haque and Kneller (2007) and Tanzi and 
21 
Davoodi (1997), who provide empirical evidence that corruption 
increases public investment but reduces its productivity and 
effect on economic growth.
Box 2
and productivity and growth using vector autoregressive (VAR) models.
1
A great number of 
economies.
of suffi ciently long time series.
3
non-oil GDP.
4
The p-th vector autoregressive model in standard form can be written as:
p
i=1
X
c + ∑ A
i
X
t-i
+ ε
t
where X
t
= [Δlog pubI
t
ΔlogprivI
t
ΔlognoGDP
t
] is the (3x1) set of variables, A
i 
is a matrix (3x3) 
of autoregressive coeffi cients, c is a vector (3x1) of intercepts and the vector ε
t
(3x1) represents 
to the usual information criteria.
5
fl exible with respect to the possible relations and 
interactions between the variables.
ding-out 
hypothesis in developing countries.
fl ation rate in Valadkhani (2004), taxes and real exchange 
d to 
be insignifi 
included 
in any of the cases.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested