20
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
rates of series in levels.
6
private investment.
7
6 ited number 
or an 
a long-run 
Pereira and 
Roca Sagales (2001), Voss (2002) and Afonso and St Aubyn (2008).
elected 
wth 
growth will start one period after the shock.
Chart A Responses to impulses on public and private investment
Algeria
Nigeria
Response of 
private investment growth
to an impulse on 
public investment growth
-0.12
-0.16
-0.08
-0.04
0.00
0.04
0.08
0.12
0.16
-0.12
-0.16
-0.08
-0.04
0.00
0.04
0.08
0.12
0.16
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
-0.4
-0.2
0.0
0.2
0.4
0.6
-0.4
-0.2
0.0
0.2
0.4
0.6
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Response of 
non-oil GDP growth
to an impulse on 
public investment growth
-0.03
-0.02
-0.01
0.00
0.01
0.02
-0.03
-0.02
-0.01
0.00
0.01
0.02
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
-0.08
-0.04
0.00
0.04
0.08
0.12
-0.08
-0.04
0.00
0.04
0.08
0.12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Response of 
non-oil GDP growth
to an impulse on 
private investment growth
-0.03
-0.02
-0.01
0.00
0.01
0.02
-0.03
-0.02
-0.01
0.00
0.01
0.02
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
-0.08
-0.04
0.00
0.04
0.08
0.12
-0.08
-0.04
0.00
0.04
0.08
0.12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Source: Own computation.
Change file from pdf to jpg on - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
change pdf file to jpg file; convert pdf to jpg for
Change file from pdf to jpg on - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf into jpg online; convert pdf to jpg batch
21
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 KEY FISCAL POLICY 
CHALLENGES STEMMING 
FROM HYDROCARBON 
DEPENDENCE
physical and fi 
seems 
are somewhere between Russia and Saudi Arabia.
Chart A Responses to impulses on public and private investment (continued)
Russia
Saudi Arabia
Response of 
private investment growth
to an impulse on 
public investment growth
-0.6
-0.4
-0.2
0.0
0.2
0.4
-0.6
-0.4
-0.2
0.0
0.2
0.4
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
-0.4
-0.2
0.0
0.2
0.4
-0.4
-0.2
0.0
0.2
0.4
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Response of 
non-oil GDP growth
to an impulse on 
public investment growth
-0.04
-0.02
0.00
0.02
0.04
0.06
-0.04
-0.02
0.00
0.02
0.04
0.06
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
-0.010
-0.005
0.000
0.005
0.010
0.015
-0.010
-0.005
0.000
0.005
0.010
0.015
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Response of 
non-oil GDP growth
to an impulse on 
private investment growth
-0.04
-0.02
0.00
0.02
0.04
0.06
-0.04
-0.02
0.00
0.02
0.04
0.06
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
-0.010
-0.005
0.000
0.005
0.010
0.015
-0.010
-0.005
0.000
0.005
0.010
0.015
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Source: Own computation.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the PDF files with the
convert pdf image to jpg image; batch pdf to jpg online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
batch pdf to jpg; convert from pdf to jpg
22
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
expected positive effects of public capital outlays from being achieved.
8
All four countries 
have relatively low governance levels, well 
below OECD levels (and far below Norway, 
which is the oil-exporting country with the 
highest level of governance and can thus 
serve as a benchmark, Chart B). Among the 
four countries under consideration, Saudi 
Arabia has the best performance in terms of 
governance, while Nigeria has the poorest, 
while Algeria shows some improvement 
from low levels over the past decade. This 
evidence is broadly supported by Transparency 
International’s corruption perception index, 
both in terms of an overall low performance 
of the four countries under consideration and 
in terms of the relative positions of the four to 
each other (see the Table above). This analysis 
points to a possible dilemma of fi scal policy 
in less developed oil-exporting countries with 
regard to public investment. Countries with 
a high need for public capital outlays given 
their relatively low stock of public investment, 
which would imply a high return on such 
investment in principle, also have relatively 
low governance levels, which tends to reduce 
the return on public investment in practice. 
8 See main text above and the literature quoted there.
Chart B Governance indicators of selected 
oil-exporting countries
-2.0
-1.5
-1.0
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
-2.0
-1.5
-1.0
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
1996 1998 8 2000 2002 2004 4 2005 2006
Algeria
Nigeria
Russia
Norway
Saudi Arabia
OECD
Source: World Bank.
Notes: Indicators for 2006. Arithmetic unweighted OECD 
average. The six governance indicators are measured in units 
ranging from -2.5 to 2.5, with higher values corresponding to 
better governance outcomes.
Perceived corruption in selected oil-exporting countries
Saudi Arabia
Algeria
Russia
Nigeria
Corruption Perception Index score
3.4
3.0
2.3
2.2
Country rank
79
99
143
147
Source: Transparency International.
business 
Memorandum: Norway: score 8.7, country rank 9.
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
image with adjusted width & height; Change image resolution JPEG image from local folders in "File" in toolbar JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from
change pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg file
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C# program. This demo code convert TIFF file all pages to bmp images.
reader pdf to jpeg; convert pdf to jpg
23
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 KEY FISCAL POLICY 
CHALLENGES STEMMING 
FROM HYDROCARBON 
DEPENDENCE
To sum up, the uncertainties surrounding the 
effects of public capital expenditure on 
productivity, future output and government 
revenues, and the diffi culties in distinguishing 
between capital expenditure and current 
expenditure,
22
warrant some caution in how far 
capital expenditure can be a substitute for the 
accumulation of fi nancial assets in achieving 
intergenerational equity and fi nancial 
sustainability in oil-exporting countries.
23
The two alternative policy options briefl y 
outlined here – accumulating fi nancial assets 
and capital expenditure – assume that oil is 
produced and revenues are received, so only 
their use has to be decided. A possible third 
option to preserve or maximise national wealth 
is to keep oil in the ground and produce at a 
later stage. This option appears attractive if the 
expected return on “oil in the ground” is higher 
than both the return on fi nancial assets and on 
capital expenditure. This would in particular 
be the case if a country expects rising oil 
prices in future, while at the same time adverse 
conditions on global fi nancial markets dampens 
returns on fi nancial investment and returns on 
capital expenditure are low, e.g. due to low 
governance levels or administrative capacity.
24
The respective returns on the use of oil revenues 
constitute the opportunity costs of leaving oil in 
the ground. The major risk involved in pursuing 
this option is that the future value of oil in the 
ground is uncertain and may be reduced by, 
for example, technological progress which 
enhances energy effi ciency and the development 
of alternative energy sources, making future oil 
demand and thus prices lower than expected. If 
such a scenario materialised, “frontloading” oil 
production would have been the better option.
3.1.2 SHORT-TERM ISSUES: MACROECONOMIC 
MANAGEMENT AND FISCAL PLANNING
The short-term challenge for fi scal policy in 
oil-exporting countries stems from the volatility 
and unpredictability of oil prices, which was 
particularly evident in 2008 with large swings 
in oil prices (from USD 99 per barrel in January 
to a peak of USD 147 in July and down to 
USD 34 in December). This means that public 
fi nances are dependent on a volatile variable 
that is largely beyond the authorities’ control. 
This poses a challenge to both macroeconomic 
management and fi scal planning. The volatility 
of oil prices, and hence government revenues, 
tends to contribute to a pro-cyclical pattern of 
government expenditure, and to abrupt changes 
in government spending, which may translate 
into macroeconomic volatility and reduced 
growth prospects. Indeed, pro-cyclicality has 
been a feature of fi scal policy in oil-exporting 
countries, as evidenced by the empirical analysis 
in Box 3. This makes a case for smoothing 
public expenditure, which is further supported 
by the other potential fi scal costs of volatile 
expenditure policies. For example, during a 
period of rapidly rising expenditure, these 
costs may include a reduction in the quality 
and effi ciency of spending due to constraints 
on administrative capacity or the realisation 
of projects with little marginal value added 
and diffi culties in containing and streamlining 
expenditure following an expansion. In periods 
of rapidly declining expenditure, moreover, 
viable investment projects may be interrupted. 
Following normal budget conventions, e.g. the salary of a teacher 
22 
is current/consumptive expenditure, while construction costs for a 
public swimming pool are capital expenditure. However, it might 
be reasonable to think that expenditure on the former has a more 
benefi cial effect on future economic growth and public revenues 
expenditure in the education (and possibly also the health) sector 
could therefore be akin to capital expenditure in the narrow 
sense, contributing to the accumulation of human capital and 
thus future economic growth. Sachs (2007), for example, sees 
human capital as another long-lasting asset that oil exporters can 
invest in, alongside fi nancial and physical assets (or leaving oil 
in the ground, see next paragraph).
Instead of classifying capital expenditure as productive 
23 
spending, whose effect on future revenues is indeed highly 
uncertain and may therefore not theoretically underpin its defi cit 
fi nancing, capital expenditure may also be regarded as more akin 
to spending on durable consumption. According to this view, 
governments undertake capital spending not because capital 
is productive, but because government capital provides social 
benefi ts for many years. Barnett and Ossowski (2002) suggest 
that this view of capital spending may provide a rationale for 
higher non-oil defi cits. Conceptually, while this view would 
be compatible with intergenerational equity considerations 
(as also future generations enjoy the social benefi ts), spending oil 
revenues on “durable consumption” would not necessarily ensure 
fi scal sustainability (as no future tax revenue is generated).
See Stevens and Mitchell (2008) on this option in the context of 
24 
oil-exporting countries’ depletion policies. 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
best pdf to jpg converter for; convert pdf to high quality jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
convert multiple pdf to jpg; reader convert pdf to jpg
24
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
In general, targeting a particular level of overall 
budget balance is rendered diffi cult by oil price 
volatility. Moreover, the overall budget balance-
to-GDP ratio has to be interpreted with even 
greater caution in oil-exporting countries than in 
industrialised economies,
25
and cannot be 
considered a reliable indicator of the course of 
fi scal policy. In a period of rising oil prices, for 
example, the defi cit (surplus)-to-GDP ratio may 
decline (rise) in spite of expansionary fi scal 
policies featuring expenditure increases or a 
reduction in non-oil revenue. Higher oil revenues 
(and higher oil GDP) would mask the fi scal 
expansion. Conversely, in a period of falling oil 
prices the defi cit (surplus)-to-GDP ratio may 
rise (fall) in spite of budgetary consolidation in 
the form of expenditure reductions and an 
increase in non-oil revenue. An assessment of 
the underlying fi scal policy stance on the basis 
of the overall balance could therefore be 
misleading. For this reason, other indicators are 
needed to guide fi scal policy and to assess the 
underlying fi scal stance, such as the non-oil 
balance/non-oil GDP ratio, an indicator which 
isolates the budget balance from oil price 
developments.
26
Non-oil balances cannot replace 
conventional fi scal indicators, like overall or 
primary balances, but they complement the 
analysis of fi scal developments in oil-centred 
economies.
In advanced economies, structural budget balances are computed 
25 
to assess the fi scal stance corrected for the cyclical impact on 
the government’s budget revenue and expenditure side. In many 
oil-exporting countries, tax systems and unemployment insurance 
schemes are underdeveloped or do not exist so far. Therefore 
automatic stabilisers do not at present play a signifi cant role 
in oil-exporting countries, and computing a structural balance 
would provide limited insight (and in most cases not be possible 
due to data constraints).
See Medas and Zakharova (2009). See also Sturm and Siegfried 
26 
(2005) on fi scal indicators in oil-exporting countries in the 
context of fi scal convergence criteria for the GCC countries.
Box 3
PRO-CYCLICAL FISCAL POLICIES IN OIL-EXPORTING COUNTRIES
This box provides empirical analysis on the pro-cyclicality of fi scal policy in oil-exporting 
1965-2005 has been selected.
1
The sample is split into two sub-periods, 1965-1984 and 
1985-2005, the fi rst covering the fi rst two oil price shocks and the second covering the beginnings 
of the recent oil price hike.
The pro-cyclicality of fi scal policy is estimated by taking public consumption as the variable 
that represents changes in fi scal policy.
2
Cyclical fl uctuations (output gaps) are modelled by 
3
A panel data 
rs 
provided by the World Bank.
2 The pro-cyclicality of fi 
fi scal variables to capture the cyclical 
behaviour of fi scal policy in Ilzetzki and Vegh (2008). Many studies use the fi scal balance as the indicator of fi scal policy, but because 
alysed in 
opriate 
ata are 
ing the 
total public expenditure growth rate (defl ated using the GDP defl ator) as the dependent variable. This, however, does not change the 
broad picture. The estimated coeffi
public consumption growth.
3 ap. As 
fi cant divergences.
C# TIFF: How to Use C#.NET Code to Compress TIFF Image File
C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object. List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); / Step1: Load image to REImage object. foreach (string file in
convert pdf file to jpg file; convert pdf into jpg format
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with PDFDocument(images.ToArray()); / Save document to a file.
convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi; change file from pdf to jpg
25
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 KEY FISCAL POLICY 
CHALLENGES STEMMING 
FROM HYDROCARBON 
DEPENDENCE
consumption to alterations in the output gap. 
fi scal variables in 
fi scal 
policy (Lane (2003), Alberola and Montero (2006), Woo (2008)).
4
Three different estimation methods are used in the table below. The fi rst column represents a 
linear model estimated using fi xed effects. The second column describes the estimation of the 
fi 
is presented in the third column.
5
The results point to pro-cyclical behaviour of fi scal policy over the whole period 1965-2005, 
coeffi cients are not only larger, but their levels of statistical signifi cance are also stronger. Thus, 
the analysis confi rms that pro-cyclical conduct of fi scal policy – frequently identifi ed in the 
period of time, with no signs of abating. 
cture 
ucation 
(Woo (2008)). Because of the lack of consensus and weak signifi 
related 
these results 
are not shown here. In any case, all the factors that refl 
the idiosyncratic term of the panel data model.
5 The coeffi 
step procedure is relied upon rather than the two step, based on the fi ndings in Judson and Owen (1997), and applied to the length of the 
cross-section and time dimensions of the dataset.
Dependent variable: Change in public consumption
Sample: 1965-1984
Sample: 1985-2005
Linear
AR
D-GMM
Linear
AR
D-GMM
P cons
0.0084
-0.1039 *
(lag)
(0.057)
(0.058)
ogap
0.2265 **
0.1685
0.3664 ***
0.4072 ***
0.3929 ***
0.8467 ***
(0.112)
(0.123)
(0.129)
(0.138)
(0.149)
(0.226)
Trade
0.00916 **
0.0100 **
0.0069
-0.0300
-0.03435
-0.0454
(0.004)
(0.004)
(0.004)
(0.024)
(0.025)
(0.027)
R within
0.024
0.022
0.031
0.029
Obs
342
324
306
338
319
299
Notes: Standard errors in brackets. 
*, **, *** denote statistical signifi cance at 10%, 5% and 1% respectively.
26
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
3.2 POLICY CHALLENGES IN THE CURRENT 
DECADE
Since the beginning of this decade, and in 
particular since 2003, oil-exporting countries’ 
budget balances have been characterised by 
high surpluses (see sub-section 2.2, Chart 5). 
While this may be perceived as, and indeed is, a 
very favourable fi scal outcome for the countries 
concerned, in particular compared to sometimes 
signifi cant budget defi cits in previous years, 
this situation poses some challenges of its own. 
The key challenge has been to calibrate fi scal 
policy between competing short and long-term 
objectives and pressures, in particular cyclical 
and intergenerational equity considerations, 
domestic political pressures and international 
considerations. This challenge has been 
mitigated somewhat since mid-2008, when 
oil prices started to fall sharply and the global 
economy slowed down signifi cantly, alleviating 
infl ationary pressure in oil-exporting countries 
which had previously been the “dark cloud” in 
an otherwise very favourable macroeconomic 
environment. 
3.2.1 FISCAL POLICY AND THE REAL ECONOMY
Fiscal expansion in booming economies
Over recent years oil-exporting countries have 
enjoyed buoyant real GDP growth (see Chart 1 
in sub-section 2.1) accompanied by high 
current account and fi scal surpluses (Charts 3 
and 5). Real GDP growth has been driven by 
domestic consumption and investment, with 
public investment playing a major role. In 
addition to private consumption, which has 
been bolstered by high consumer confi dence as 
a result of high oil prices, expansionary fi scal 
policy has been a key driver of the economic 
expansion of recent years. Indeed, fi scal 
expansion is the key mechanism in most 
oil-exporting countries for “injecting” oil 
revenues into the economy (see Chart 11).
27
As 
in most major oil-exporting countries upstream 
activities in the oil sector are controlled by 
state oil companies (e.g. Saudi Aramco in 
Saudi Arabia) oil revenues accrue directly and 
completely to the government. Thus, the use of 
oil revenues is a fi scal policy decision, and it is 
via public expenditure that oil revenues impact 
the domestic economy, including infl ation.
28
Fiscal policy has been expansionary over past 
years, as evidenced in public expenditure 
growth and the development of non-oil defi cits. 
The fi scal expansion has been masked by high 
and rising surpluses, as increasing expenditure 
See e.g. Husain, Tazhibayeva and Ter-Martirosyan (2008). They 
27 
show – based on panel VAR analysis and the associated impulse 
responses – that once fi scal policy changes are removed, oil 
price shocks do not have a signifi cant independent effect on the 
economic cycle.
In the case of Saudi Arabia, typically about 93% of Saudi 
28 
Aramco’s profi ts, which has the monopoly of oil production in 
the country, are transferred to the government in the form of 
royalties and dividends which is a legacy of the company’s history 
as a private American company before being fully nationalised 
in 1980 – see Myers Jaffe and Elass (2007). Retained earnings 
are used to fi nance the company’s normal operations. While 
Saudi Aramco has a high degree of operational independence, all 
strategic decisions are taken by the Supreme Petroleum Council, 
so oil income and its use are ultimately controlled by the Saudi 
Government. Furthermore, the company is used for quasi-fi scal 
activities – see footnote 31.
Table 2 Real increases in public expenditure in selected oil-exporting countries
(percent; year-on-year)
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008 
*
Algeria
-6.1
13.1
20.2
11.3
9.1
14.8
Nigeria
12.1
2.4
11.6
3.4
12.3
18.1
Russia
5.6
5.5
20.2
9.3
19.4
20.1
Saudi Arabia
4.5
17.0
11.3
10.3
12.0
-0.9
Oil exporters average
5.4
10.0
20.8
12.5
10.6
14.6
Sources: IMF (* projections) and ECB staff calculations. 
CPI infl 
27
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 KEY FISCAL POLICY 
CHALLENGES STEMMING 
FROM HYDROCARBON 
DEPENDENCE
has not kept pace with revenue growth. Public 
expenditure growth in oil-exporting countries 
has been buoyant, with double-digit increases 
in real terms in every year since 2004 (Table 2). 
As public debt has fallen sharply (see Chart 6), 
interest expenditure has come down, so it may 
be assumed, although no concise data are 
available, that primary spending has risen even 
faster. Among the four countries under 
consideration, expenditure growth was highest 
in Russia and Algeria. The spike in Russian 
spending in 2007-08 was related to 
parliamentary and presidential elections taking 
place in 2007. In 2004 Algeria launched a USD 
55 billion public investment programme, later 
augmented to USD 155 billion (120% of 2007 
GDP), focusing in particular on social housing 
and transport infrastructure. Saudi Arabia also 
recorded signifi cant fi scal expansion, centred 
on an ambitious investment programme, with 
projects worth USD 350 billion (93% of 2007 
GDP) underway or being planned, including 
Chart 11 
Oil revenue
State oil-company
Government
Savings
(foreign assets in central bank 
and/or SWFs)
Expenditure
(capital and current)
Income of private households
Corporate profits
Liquidity in banking system
Money and credit
Domestic demand
(public and private 
consumption and investment)
Imports
Inflation
Financial
channel
Trade
channel
Oil revenue
recycling
Depending on exchange
rate regime and currency
movements
USD
USD
USD
Domestic currency
Source: Own compilation.
28
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
the establishment of up to six “economic 
cities”.
29
The projected decrease in public 
expenditure in real terms in 2008 is related to a 
spike in infl ation (see sub-section 3.2.2). 
Expenditure growth was relatively moderate in 
Nigeria until 2008, pointing to the effects of a 
newly introduced oil-price based fi scal rule in 
fostering fi scal discipline (see Section 4). 
However, the release of a portion of the 
country’s windfall oil savings to the three tiers 
of government in the course of 2008 points to 
risks to fi scal discipline. 
The development of non-oil defi cits (see above 
on this indicator) also points to the expansionary 
course of fi scal policy (Table 3). While levels 
are not directly comparable, owing to different 
defi nitions, the trend towards fi scal expansion 
is clear in all four countries. Non-oil defi cits 
rose sharply in Saudi Arabia and Algeria as a 
percentage of non-oil GDP. In Russia, for which 
no computation of non-oil GDP is available, 
the non-oil defi cit-to-GDP ratio increased from 
3.9% of GDP in 2003 to a projected 7.2% 
in 2008. In Nigeria, the non-oil primary defi cit 
as a percentage of non-oil GDP increased only 
moderately between 2004 and 2007, with a 
relatively sharp jump projected for 2008. 
Fiscal expansion via expenditure increases 
in recent years has focused on capital outlays 
(Table 4). Growth in capital expenditure 
between 2003 and 2008 exceeded increases in 
current expenditure (and thus total expenditure). 
As a result, the share of capital expenditure in 
The establishment of six economic cities is a key element of Saudi 
29 
Arabia’s investment programme. Each economic city is intended to 
focus on specifi c economic activities and industries. The economic 
cities are seen as key to fostering diversifi cation and re-balancing 
growth between the country’s regions. Unlike in the smaller Gulf 
oil-exporting countries regional disparities are an issue in Saudi 
Arabia. The cities are primarily to be established in regions which 
have not benefi ted from the buoyant activity in recent years. 
To realise its ambitious investment programme, Saudi Arabia, like 
other oil-exporting countries, increasingly utilises public-private 
partnerships (PPPs) in areas that traditionally were domains of 
public investment. While PPPs can increase effi ciency, e.g. in 
procurement and by resorting to private sector innovation and 
management skills, they also involve risks. They may, for example, 
give rise to contingent liabilities and reduce fi scal transparency, 
unless governed by strong institutional frameworks.
Table 3 Trends in non-oil deficits in selected oil-exporting countries
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008 *
Algeria 1)
-27.9
-30.1
-34.7
-36.0
-36.9
-39.5
Nigeria 2) 
-24.0 
-27.0 
-29.0 
-28.0 
-32.0
Russia 3) 
-3.9 
-2.9 
-5.1 
-4.5 
-5.5 
-7.2
Saudi Arabia 1)
-46.7 
-45.8 
-50.9 
-52.7 
-59.2 
-51.5
Source: IMF (* projections).
1) Central government fi scal balance as a percentage of non-oil GDP.
Table 4 Capital expenditure in selected oil-exporting countries
Capital expenditure
Memorandum:
% of total 
expenditure
of GDP
Real increase 
2003-2008
Real total expenditure 
increase 2003-2008
2003
2008
2003
2008
(%)
(%)
Algeria
37.1
40.5
10.9
11.5
104.5
87.4
Nigeria
16.6
33.3
3.1
4.4
145.5
22.6
Saudi Arabia
14.4
25.9
4.8
6.9
195.1
63.6
Russia
13.1
14.7
4.6
5.0
109.7
87.5
Sources: IMF and ECB staff calculations. 2008 data are IMF projections.
capital expenditure includes large-scale infrastructure projects (fi nanced by state and local government). Russia: gross public fi xed capital 
formation.
29
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 KEY FISCAL POLICY 
CHALLENGES STEMMING 
FROM HYDROCARBON 
DEPENDENCE
total expenditure and as a percentage of GDP 
increased over the past fi ve years. The most 
pronounced increase in real terms was in Saudi 
Arabia, while it was more moderate in Algeria 
and Russia. Given that these two countries 
exhibited the highest overall rise in expenditure, 
this points to dynamic increases in current 
expenditure as well. 
Indeed, current expenditure was also raised to a 
non-negligible extent in all four countries, 
although, given the even faster expansion of 
capital expenditure and fast nominal GDP 
growth its share in total expenditure and as a 
percentage of GDP declined (Table 5).
30
For 
example, between 2003 and 2008 outlays on 
public wages increased by 75% in Algeria and 
expenditure on subsidies in Saudi Arabia rose 
by almost 30%.
31
The degree and pattern of 
fi scal expansion is also observable in the 
elasticity of public spending with regard to 
changes in public revenues (Box 4).
Current expenditure increases appear very moderate in Nigeria. 
30 
While indeed some fi scal moderation is observable in Nigeria, 
not least as a result of a fi scal rule, Table 5 may underestimate 
growth in current outlays, as only federal government and 
extra-budgetary expenditure is reported. However, as Nigeria is 
a federal state with substantive public spending at regional level, 
current expenditure is not fully captured. 
The budget fi gure for subsidies in Saudi Arabia tends to vastly 
31 
underestimate the degree of subsidisation in the country. Direct 
subsidies in the budget accounted for less than 1% of GDP in 
2007. However, Saudi Aramco, the state oil company, sells 
domestic fuel at below market prices, which is an implicit subsidy 
estimated at 11.5% of GDP in 2007. This implies that the subsidy 
is prima facie borne by Saudi Aramco. However, as it reduces the 
profi t transferred by the company to the government, it ultimately 
has a fi scal cost in the form of reduced oil revenues. Similar 
indirect subsidies exist for water and electricity, for example. 
Saudi Aramco is one example of the quasi-fi scal activities 
conducted by state oil companies in many oil-exporting countries. 
Nigeria’s NNPC also subsidises domestic fuel to redistribute oil 
proceeds to the general population. Russia’s Rosneft has been 
tapped as a tool for regional development in remote regions. See 
Baker Institute (2007). 
Table 5 Current expenditure in selected oil-exporting countries
Current expenditure
Memorandum:
% of total 
expenditure
of GDP
Real increase 
2003-2008
Real total expenditure 
increase 2003-2008
2003
2008
2003
2008
(%)
(%)
Algeria
72.9
59.5
21.4
16.9
52.8
87.4
Nigeria 
83.3
72.9
15.3
9.6
7.4
22.6
Saudi Arabia
85.6
74.1
28.5
19.7
41.5
63.6
Russia
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
87.5
Sources: IMF and ECB staff calculations. 2008 data are IMF projections.
general 
government.
Box 4
COUNTRIES
have been computed. As oil revenues account for a signifi cant share of total public revenues in 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested