mvc export to pdf : Convert from pdf to jpg Library application class asp.net html winforms ajax ecbocp1044-part541

40
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
policies and the accommodation of some of 
the expenditure pressures mentioned above. 
Addressing development-related spending needs 
is a variation on the same theme. 
3.2.4 OPTIONS TO MITIGATE CONFLICTS BETWEEN 
COMPETING FISCAL OBJECTIVES
Global economic and fi nancial developments 
since mid-2008 have somewhat alleviated the 
confl icts between the competing fi scal objectives 
discussed above, as infl ationary pressure is 
set to diminish, including in oil-exporting 
countries. Therefore, cyclical considerations in 
particular no longer call for fi scal restraint to the 
extent they did before (see sub-section 3.2.2). 
Nevertheless, the experience of the past few 
years provides some important policy lessons 
and points to ways to mitigate possible confl icts 
should they intensify again.
Assuming that monetary policy is not given a 
greater role in curbing infl ationary pressure, 
i.e. that existing exchange rate regimes are 
maintained, two ways of mitigating the confl icts 
between the different fi scal objectives outlined 
above stand out: improving the structure and 
optimising the phasing of public spending.
Improving the structure of public spending
Improving the structure of public spending 
requires the focusing of expenditure increases 
on investment, while at the same time containing 
consumptive expenditure. Moreover, capital 
expenditure needs to be concentrated in those 
areas that represent bottlenecks in the economy 
and thus contribute to infl ationary pressure. 
An example is the housing sector in Saudi 
Arabia and other GCC countries. Infl ation in the 
region has been driven to a large extent by rent 
increases for housing, but also for commercial 
property. This refl ects housing shortages as a 
result of population growth, which is due to high 
birth rates, a high number of young families, 
immigration of foreign labour and the opening 
of the real estate sector to foreigners in some 
countries. Accordingly, investment in housing 
projects, in particular for low-income earners, 
has the potential to alleviate infl ationary pressure 
over the medium term.
48
Another example is 
investment in oil production capacity, which 
would help to dampen upward pressure on oil 
prices and thus be conducive to containing 
global infl ation pressures in the medium term, 
once the global economy recovers from the 
current downturn.
Furthermore, there is scope to contain 
consumptive expenditure. Although the bulk of 
expenditure increases over the past few years 
have focused on investment, and the share of 
capital expenditure in total expenditure has 
increased at the expense of current expenditure 
in most countries (see Tables 4 and 5 in 
sub-section 3.2.1), current expenditure has also 
risen signifi cantly. Thus, containing public 
wages and cutting subsidies would offer room 
to increase capital expenditure without unduly 
raising total expenditure. In other words, 
focusing on development-related spending 
needs as described above would help to calibrate 
fi scal policy in a way that is more conducive to 
macroeconomic stability.
Optimising the phasing of public spending
Optimising the phasing of public spending 
entails giving priority to public spending 
(in particular investment) that helps to alleviate 
bottlenecks in the economy and increases 
its absorptive capacity (see above) and 
postponing other less urgent public investment 
to periods with lower infl ationary pressure. 
Although the timing of public investment tends 
to be diffi cult to fi ne-tune, recent economic 
developments provide a good example. 
In 2007-08 public investment might have 
added to rising infl ationary pressure, but it 
may be much less problematic from a cyclical 
point of view in 2009-10 in the wake of the 
global economic downturn, lower oil prices 
and receding infl ationary pressure, and may 
even be a welcome contribution to stabilising 
the domestic and global economy (see also 
sub-section 3.2.1). 
Smoothing public expenditure may also help 
central bank liquidity operations. Erratic 
See also Khan (2008).
48 
Convert from pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file into jpg; best pdf to jpg converter
Convert from pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg c#; convert pdf pages to jpg online
41
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 KEY FISCAL POLICY 
CHALLENGES STEMMING 
FROM HYDROCARBON 
DEPENDENCE
expenditure on, for example, investment projects 
may lead to sharp liquidity fl uctuations in the 
banking system (which in the past has been 
characterised in general by excess liquidity in 
oil-exporting countries), making it more diffi cult 
for central banks to mop up excess liquidity 
(through, for example, reserve requirements or 
the issuance of certifi cates of deposits). 
Tightening monetary policy
Domestic monetary tightening would also help 
to alleviate confl icts between competing fi scal 
objectives. As mentioned above, monetary 
tightening at times when infl ationary pressure 
is on the rise would require the modifi cation 
of existing exchange rate regimes and policies. 
If monetary policy were given a greater role in 
containing infl ationary pressure, fi scal policy 
would be freed from the burden of being the 
main macroeconomic tool for this. Monetary 
tightening would lead to a re-balancing of the 
macroeconomic policy mix, and enable higher 
fi scal spending without quasi-automatically 
contributing to infl ationary pressure. Thereby, a 
tighter monetary policy would help to reconcile 
competing fi scal policy objectives. For example, 
it would help oil-exporting countries to lower 
infl ation and thus achieve a domestic objective 
without a signifi cant fi scal retrenchment, which 
would reduce their contribution to addressing 
global imbalances and the recycling of oil 
revenues via the trade channel. 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert .pdf to .jpg online; batch convert pdf to jpg online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF files to JPG.
convert multi page pdf to single jpg; change format from pdf to jpg
42
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
INSTITUTIONAL RESPONSES
This section reviews the most common 
institutional practices of oil-exporting countries 
in response to the general and recent policy 
challenges analysed above. These institutional 
responses are (i) setting up budgets on the basis 
of conservative oil price assumptions, 
(ii) establishing oil stabilisation and savings 
funds (OSSFs)
49
and (iii) introducing implicit or 
explicit fi scal rules. A box provides additional 
information on two resource-rich countries, 
Norway and Botswana, often regarded as 
success stories due to, among other things, 
carefully designed institutions. 
4.1 CONSERVATIVE OIL PRICE ASSUMPTIONS
IN THE BUDGET
The budgets of many oil-exporting countries are 
based on very conservative oil price assumptions 
that could be regarded as unrealistically low, in 
particular between 2004 and 2008. Although 
budgeted oil prices have tended to be adjusted 
upwards over recent years in view of the oil price 
boom, the adjustment has lagged signifi cantly 
behind actual price development. For example, 
in Algeria the reference oil price in the 2008 
budget was increased to USD 37 per barrel 
(up from USD 19 per barrel). This practice 
of basing budgets on conservative oil price 
assumptions has both merits and drawbacks. 
On one hand, it is a sign of fi scal prudence 
and is often motivated by political economy 
considerations. Budgeting for relatively low 
revenues helps contain expenditure, as the 
draft budget displays only small surpluses or 
even defi cits. If higher revenues based on more 
realistic oil price assumptions were used and 
the initial budget showed large surpluses, it 
would be more diffi cult for the authorities to 
resist various pressures to increase expenditure. 
On the other hand, basing the budget on 
conservative oil price assumptions reduces 
fi scal transparency and increases the leeway for 
the executive to spend. For example, in Saudi 
Arabia
50
(Table 9), actual expenditure over the 
past years has exceeded budgeted expenditure by 
15-20%. Thus, the budget as published, and the 
expenditure foreseen therein, tend to be different 
to the actual outcome. The government has full 
discretion over the use of the additional revenue 
received in the course of the year. Among the 
four countries under closer consideration in 
this paper, Russia had the least conservative oil 
price assumption in 2008, closest to the actual 
market price, which was initially even raised for 
2009 (to USD 95 per barrel), contrary to other 
countries and the downward trend in oil prices 
since mid-2008, but later was revised sharply 
downwards (to USD 41 per barrel) (Table 10). 
4.2 OIL STABILISATION AND SAVINGS FUNDS
Most oil-exporting countries have set up oil 
stabilisation and/or savings funds which manage 
part of the country’s foreign assets and usually 
invest them more aggressively than central 
banks invest traditional foreign exchange 
Oil stabilisation and savings funds are often also referred to as 
49 
sovereign wealth funds (SWFs). Indeed, OSSFs usually qualify 
as SWFs, and the oldest SWFs are OSSFs, e.g. Kuwait’s. 
However, not all SWFs are OSSFs, as SWFs have also been 
established by non-commodity exporters, such as China and 
Singapore, to manage foreign assets.
Unlike many other oil-exporting countries Saudi Arabia does not 
50 
publish an explicit oil price assumption underlying the budget, 
but the budgeted oil revenue. Assuming a level of oil production, 
private sector observers estimate an implicit assumption, on 
which the budget is based.
Table 9 Saudi Arabia’s 2007 budget versus actual outcome
Budget 
(Saudi riyal, billion)
Actual 
(Saudi riyal, billion)
Difference 
(%)
Revenue 
400 
622 
55
Expenditure 
380 
443 
17
Surplus 
20 
179 
793
Source: Jadwa Investment.
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
changing pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg format
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
pdf to jpeg converter; advanced pdf to jpg converter
43
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 INSTITUTIONAL 
RESPONSES
reserves. Apart from this investment return 
motive,
51
the establishment of these funds is 
mainly driven by fi scal policy considerations. 
The stabilisation function of oil funds addresses 
the short-term challenges of fi scal policy and 
aims to make the conduct of policy less volatile 
and less pro-cyclical by de-linking public 
spending from oil prices. When oil prices are 
high, the funds may also help contain infl ation 
and avoid over-heating in the economy. When 
oil prices are low, they provide a buffer for 
“rainy days”, as governments can draw on the 
fund and thus prevent sharp and potentially 
disruptive adjustments in expenditure. The 
savings function of oil funds addresses the long-
term challenges of intergenerational equity and 
fi scal sustainability that accompany non-
renewable resources. The revenue from 
accumulated fi nancial assets can replace income 
from oil once those resources are exhausted. 
The funds can also be drawn upon for capital 
spending where there is a high return (e.g. for 
economic diversifi cation) and can be used to 
pay down external debt.
However, oil funds pose a number of challenges 
of their own, including with regard to 
governance, transparency and accountability, 
and are not a panacea for the fi scal challenges 
of oil-exporting countries.
52
They are not a 
substitute for explicit fi scal policy decisions or 
fi scal rules (see below) and political commitment 
both to smoothing expenditure and to ensuring 
long-term fi scal sustainability. Furthermore, 
their contribution to sound fi scal policies 
depends on the general quality of institutions 
and public fi nancial management. In countries 
where oil funds seem to have enhanced fi scal 
prudence, the effect might simply be ascribed 
to self-selection effects. Nevertheless, there is 
some evidence that oil funds are conducive to 
reducing macroeconomic volatility.
53
This may 
be attributed to the fact that OSSFs tend to be 
used as a tool for neutralising the monetary 
impact of oil-related capital infl ows (i.e. for 
keeping oil revenues outside the domestic 
banking sector).
Turning to the four countries under review, 
the oil fund of Nigeria, the Excess Crude 
Oil account, established in 2004, is solely a 
stabilisation fund. The main rationale behind 
the Excess Crude Oil account is to close budget 
defi cits due to oil price volatility, and potentially 
to fund domestic infrastructure investments, as 
the infrastructure gap is a major impediment 
to growth in Nigeria. Oil revenues in excess 
of the budgeted oil price and production level 
are transferred into the Excess Crude Oil 
account, which is held at the central bank in 
the names of the various government entities, 
as Nigeria is a federal state (see below on the 
fi scal rule). Nigeria’s Excess Crude Oil account 
has increased from USD 5.1 billion in 2004 to 
USD 17.3 billion in 2007. The fi rst withdrawal 
at the federal level was used for payment of 
external debt (October 2005). 
The oil fund of Algeria, the Fonds de Régulation 
des Recettes, was established in 2000 in order to 
(i) restore the cushion of external reserves that 
had previously declined, (ii) service the stock 
of public debt, and (iii) smooth the longer-term 
profi le of expenditure. The rationale behind the 
Fonds de Régulation des Recettes, a sub-account 
of the government at the central bank in dinars, 
is to act as a stabilisation fund; it does not have 
an explicit intergenerational transfer purpose. 
Since 2004 the resources have been split between 
a small “liquid” part and a large portfolio of 
fi xed-income securities. Returns on reserves are 
ultimately transferred to the budget in the form 
of central bank dividends.
54
The operational 
features of the fund leave considerable room for 
discretion. The assets are used to fund domestic 
infrastructure investments, given the large need 
for infrastructure, including social housing, and 
See Beck and Fidora (2008) on sovereign wealth funds from an 
51 
investment and global fi nancial market perspective.
See Fasano (2000) and Davis, Ossowski, Daniel and Barnett 
52 
(2001) for a review of the international experience with OSSFs.
Based on a panel data set of 15 oil-exporting countries, empirical 
53 
estimates of Shabsigh and Ilahi (2007) indicate a robust negative 
relationship between the presence of an oil fund on one hand and 
domestic infl ation, the volatility of prices and the volatility of 
broad money on the other.
IMF (2008).
54 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf to jpeg on
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg image
44
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
to fi nance subsidies for basic commodities to 
protect consumers from higher world prices. 
Revenue earned from oil prices above the 
assumed level is deposited in the fund. Algeria’s 
Fonds de Régulation des Recettes is estimated 
to have reached around USD 50 billion at the 
end of 2007.
The oil fund of Russia, the Oil Stabilisation 
Fund, was established in  2004 following the 
adoption of the Budget Code of the Russian 
Federation in December 2003. It is a cross 
between a stabilisation and a savings fund with 
the objective of fi nancing the federal budget 
defi cit if the oil price falls below the reference 
price.
55
In addition to the unspent fi scal surplus 
of the previous year, the fi nancing of the 
stabilisation fund held at the central bank comes 
from two sources: oil export duties (in excess of 
a reference price) and the mineral extraction tax. 
The legislation stipulates that when the oil 
stabilisation fund reaches RUR 500 billion, the 
revenues accumulated can be drawn upon to 
repay external debt, as was the case in 2005 to 
repay loans to the IMF and to the Paris Club and 
in 2006 again to the Paris Club. In addition, the 
government also used the fund to cover the 
Pension Fund defi cit arising as a result of the 
2005 cut in the Unifi ed Social Tax.
56
In 
February 2008 the oil stabilisation fund was 
split between a Reserve Fund – USD 137 billion 
at end-2008 – with a stabilisation function 
(budget defi cits are fi nanced out of assets from 
the Reserve Fund and through borrowing, 
subject to a maximum limit) and a Future 
Generation Fund – USD 88 billion at end-2008 – 
with a savings function (also called the National 
Welfare Fund) to which the portion of income 
exceeding the Reserve Fund’s upper limit is 
transferred.
57
When the Reserve Fund reaches 
10% of GDP, the additional funds are transferred 
to the Future Generation Fund. 
Saudi Arabia does not have an explicit oil 
stabilisation or savings fund, unlike other 
GCC oil-exporting countries.
58
Foreign assets 
are mainly accumulated by the Saudi Arabian 
Monetary Agency (SAMA), Saudi Arabia’s 
central bank. The bulk of these assets are 
not formally classifi ed as foreign exchange 
reserves, as reported, for example, to the IMF. 
Foreign exchange reserves in the narrow sense, 
reported on SAMA’s balance sheet as “Foreign 
Currencies and Gold” amount to around 
USD 32 billion (September 2008) and have 
risen only moderately over recent years (from 
around USD 20 billion in 2002). By contrast, 
foreign assets classifi ed as “Investment in 
Foreign Securities” and as “Deposits with Banks 
Abroad” amount to USD 405 billion (up from 
USD 22 billion in 2002).
59
Investment in foreign 
securities are assumed to be allocated somewhat 
less conservatively than foreign exchange 
reserves in the narrow sense, without following 
the more aggressive investment patterns of 
SWFs, however. In 2008 a small sovereign 
wealth fund (the Saudi Arabian Investment 
Co., with a capital of USD 5.3 billion) was 
established under the management of the Public 
Investment Fund (PIF). Until now the fund has 
had a domestic focus, providing loans to and 
holding stakes in Saudi companies.
60
4.3 FISCAL RULES
The widespread experience with the “defi cit 
bias” and excessive government spending driven 
by political economy factors in both 
industrialised and emerging market economies 
has drawn attention to fi scal rules as a possible 
remedy. Fiscal rules can be quantitative, 
Beck and Fidora (2008).
55 
Gianella (2007).
56 
Lainela (2007). According to Russia’s Minister of Finance, the 
57 
National Welfare Fund will be invested in foreign securities after 
the global fi nancial turmoil settles down.
E.g. Kuwait’s fund, created in 1953, is the oldest and Abu 
58 
Dhabi’s fund, created in 1976, is believed to be the largest in 
the world.
Saudi Arabia’s foreign assets have not increased to the extent 
59 
that could be expected, given the size of the country’s oil 
revenues, as large parts were used to reduce the previously 
high public debt (see sub-section 2.2). The main counterpart of 
SAMA’s foreign assets on the balance sheet are “Deposits of the 
central government and government agencies and institutions”, 
which have also increased signifi cantly since 2003. Furthermore, 
SAMA also holds foreign assets of “independent organisations”, 
mainly the two major pension funds, which in September 2008 
accounted for USD 67 billion.
The PIF is under the auspices of the Ministry of Finance. Some 
60 
foreign assets are also held at SAMA by the social security 
institutions, which currently generate large surpluses owing to 
Saudi Arabia’s demography.
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
best pdf to jpg converter online; convert pdf document to jpg
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from PDF Images on Windows. Features and Benefits. Powerful image converter to convert images of JPG, JPEG formats to PDF files;
convert pdf images to jpg; change pdf to jpg format
45
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 INSTITUTIONAL 
RESPONSES
i.e. provide numerical benchmarks for one or 
more key parameters of fi scal policy with the 
aim of limiting political discretion, or procedural, 
i.e. aim at improving budgetary institutions and 
management. Fiscal rules – like oil funds – are 
not a panacea to address fi scal challenges and 
involve problems of their own, including 
appropriately balancing simplicity and 
transparency on one hand against fl exibility and 
room for discretion on the other, ensuring 
effective enforcement and avoiding incentives 
for “creative accounting”. Nevertheless, it is 
increasingly acknowledged that carefully 
designed fi scal rules can constitute a helpful 
device to foster fi scal discipline. Given the 
volatility of oil revenues and the tendency 
towards pro-cyclical fi scal policies in 
oil-exporting countries (see Box 3), fi scal rules 
could be particularly useful for guiding fi scal 
policy in oil-exporting countries, while at the 
same time the choice of an appropriate numerical 
indicator is challenging, given the impact of oil 
price fl uctuations on the budget.
61
There are so far only few oil-exporting countries 
that have introduced explicit fi scal rules that 
target non-oil defi cits, as suggested by the 
literature (see sub-section 3.1), most notably 
Norway (see Box 5), while some countries 
have implicit, rudimentary rules that appear 
less binding, often based on budgeted oil prices, 
that determine transfers to an oil fund. In recent 
years Nigeria has moved to a more sophisticated 
framework.
In Nigeria, since 2004, all three tiers of 
government have been operating in accordance 
with an oil-price-based fi scal rule, supported by 
a medium-term fi scal strategy (MTFS), which 
includes targets for the non-oil primary defi cit. 
The key provision is that oil revenues above 
the budgeted level of prices and production are 
transferred to the Excess Crude Oil account. 
The constitution provides that all tiers of 
government – federal, state and local – share 
oil revenues. Oil producing states receive 13% 
upfront and of the remaining 87% the federal 
government receives 52.7%, the states 26.7%, 
and local government 20.6%. When the Fiscal 
Responsibility Act is passed into law by the 
36 states it will institutionalise the so far voluntary 
use of the oil-price-based fi scal rule.
62
The 
fi scal rule has been instrumental in containing 
spending at levels more conducive to 
macroeconomic stability in recent years and 
was central to the turnaround in Nigeria’s 
economic performance. The rule is designed to 
link government spending with the long-term 
oil price,
63
thereby de-coupling government 
spending from current oil revenues. This reduces 
the volatility of public expenditure and leads to 
the saving of part of the oil windfall receipts.
64
Algeria’s fi scal policy is guided by a rule 
under which oil and gas revenues exceeding 
the budgeted level based on a conservative 
oil price assumption are transferred to the oil 
fund (see above). Since 2000, the state budget 
has consistently been based on a low oil price 
(USD 19 per barrel). However, based on the 
average for the previous 10 years the government 
has decided to increase the reference price in 
the 2008 mid-year supplementary budget from 
USD 19 per barrel to USD 37 per barrel. The 
upward revision of the oil price is still likely 
to leave the government with a large apparent 
budget defi cit and a de facto substantial fi scal 
surplus in 2008. 
See sub-section 3.1 and Sturm and Siegfried (2005). It has 
61 
to be noted that most of the literature on fi scal rules and their 
usefulness for containing the “defi cit bias” concerns countries 
with democratic political systems. Much less is known about 
the political economy with regard to public defi cits in political 
systems where elections are not the ultimate source of political 
power and legitimacy. This is a topic that deserves further 
research. For example, enforcement of fi scal rules may prove to 
be particularly challenging in such an environment. 
Most of the provisions are legally binding only on the federal 
62 
government, while encouraging states to adhere to the same 
framework. In September 2007 a political agreement was reached 
under which all states are to adopt fi scal responsibility legislation 
(IMF, 2008), which would make the use of oil revenues received 
under the oil-price-based rule less discretionary and facilitate 
fi scal coordination.
The reference price for oil in the budget appears conservative 
63 
even if it has increased (2004: USD 25 per barrel; 2005: USD 30 
per barrel; 2006: USD 35 per barrel, 2007: USD 40 per barrel, 
2008: USD 59 per barrel).
Budina 
64 
et al (2007).
46
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
Russian fi scal policy is also guided by a rule 
under which oil and gas revenues exceeding the 
budgeted level, based on an oil price assumption 
which has become less conservative over the 
past few years, are transferred to the oil fund. 
Given, in particular, the large expenditure 
increases of recent years, especially in the 
context of the elections of 2007 (see 
sub-section 3.2.1), the apparently limited 
impact of public investment in enhancing 
non-oil GDP growth (see Box 2) and the upward 
trend in infl ation since mid-2007, and in view 
of Russia’s federal structure, an explicit fi scal 
rule could be conducive to fi scal discipline and 
macroeconomic stability and, for example, 
restrain mounting pressure to draw on the oil 
fund. Starting in the 2008 budget, Russia 
introduced a three-year budget regime with the 
aim of assuring consistency of fi scal policy and 
effective use of state resources.
65
Saudi Arabia’s fi scal policy is conducted without 
any implicit or explicit fi scal rule, leaving the 
executive with a very high level of discretion 
over public expenditure (see also above). 
Table 10 summarises the main features of the four 
countries concerning oil price assumptions in the 
budget, OSSFs and fi scal rules. The practices of 
the four (as well as other) oil-exporting countries 
indicate that these instruments are separate, 
i.e. can be used in isolation. For example, an 
OSSF can be established without transfers into 
or withdrawals from the fund being guided by 
any rule. Such full discretion is likely to sharply 
reduce the value of an oil fund in fostering fi scal 
discipline. On the other hand, in principle, a 
strict fi scal rule is feasible without establishing 
an OSSF as a separate entity or account. It 
Bofi t (2007).
65 
Table 10 
Algeria
Nigeria
Russia
Saudi Arabia
Oil price assumption 
in the budget
USD 37 (2008) 
USD 37 (2009)
USD 59 (2008) 
USD 45 (2009)
USD 74 (2008)
USD 41 (2009)
Not offi cially released. 
Private sector estimates: 
approx. 
USD 50 (2008) 
USD 45 (2009)
Oil stabilisation 
and savings fund
“Fonds de Régulation 
des Recettes” 
(since 2000) 
Primarily a stabilisation 
function 
(USD 50 billion)
“Excess Crude Oil 
account” (since 2004) 
Stabilisation function 
(USD 17.3 billion)
1) “Reserve Fund” 
Stabilisation function 
(USD 137 billion) 
2) “Future Generations 
Fund” Savings function 
(USD 88 billion) 
(The fund established 
in 2004 was split in two 
in February 2008.)
“Saudi Arabian 
Investment Co.” 
(since 2008) 
Savings function 
(USD 5.3 billion) 
The bulk of foreign 
assets that are not 
foreign exchange 
reserves in the 
narrow sense are 
managed by SAMA 
(USD 405 billion).
Fiscal rule
Oil revenues above 
the budgeted level 
are transferred to 
the oil fund.
Oil revenues above 
the budgeted level 
are transferred to the 
oil fund. Under the 
constitution, all tiers of 
government (federal, 
state, and local) share 
oil revenues. An MTFS 
includes targets for the 
non-oil primary defi cit.
Oil revenues above 
the budgeted level 
are transferred to 
the oil fund.
None
Sources: National authorities and Middle East Economic Survey (MEES).
for 
Saudi Arabia.
47
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 INSTITUTIONAL 
RESPONSES
appears most effective, however, to combine 
the instruments in a consistent manner by, for 
example, establishing an explicit fi scal rule 
guiding transfers into and withdrawals from 
a transparent and well-governed oil fund. Oil 
price assumptions can play a role in designing 
the fi scal rule, in particular if targeting non-oil 
budget balances to non-oil GDP is technically 
too challenging or is seen as not suffi ciently 
transparent in the specifi c context of a country.
Box 5
economic development. 
Norway
Norway is the world’s fi 
most other industrialised countries, faces a fi scal challenge related to the ageing of its population. 
fi scal policy 
framework currently in place is effective and conducive to fi scal discipline. The fi scal framework 
includes an explicit fi 
fi nance future 
The fi 
non-oil defi 
government budget and be used for expenditure. Deviations from the 4% fi scal rule have been 
Notwithstanding frequent deviations from the fi scal rule, it is seen as having been successful 
in promoting fi 
supported by Norway’s infl ation targeting framework. Norway’s success in managing natural 
resource wealth can not solely be attributed to the fi scal rule and the oil fund as such, but their 
successful implementation and the relatively high degree of fi scal restraint over the past years 
and a relatively diversifi ed economy reduce the development-related spending needs. Mature 
48
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
public fi nances, in particular in view of an ageing population.
Botswana
fl ict 
and to prudent fi 
fi nance “investment expenditure”, which is defi ned as development expenditure and recurrent 
fi scal 
policy has been key for channelling diamond 
revenues into capital investment, with the 
government investing in a transparent way in 
infrastructure, education and health. Botswana 
ranks well above the average of middle income 
countries in terms of World Bank governance 
indicators and is not far from high-income 
countries. The success of Botswana is due 
to the adoption of good policies which have 
promoted investment and the socially effi cient 
exploitation of resource rents (Acemoglu 
et al, 2001). As in the case of Norway, it 
is not the specifi c institutions like funds or 
fi scal rules per se, but their embedment in an 
environment of good governance and high 
quality institutions in general that allows them 
to achieve their positive effects. The fact that 
such an environment – unlike in the case of 
Norway – has been created in an African 
country with an initially low level of economic 
development is particularly noteworthy. 
Botswana’s GDP per capita
0
5
10
15
20
25
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 7 2009*
y-axis: USD tsd, PPP terms (left-hand scale);
percent (right-hand scale)
GDP per capita (left-hand scale)
...as a share of the euro area (right-hand scale)
...as a share of the EU (right-hand scale)
Source: IMF (* projection).
49
ECB
Occasional Paper No 104
June 2009
 CONCLUSIONS
CONCLUSIONS
Macroeconomic developments in oil-exporting 
countries over the past few years have been 
favourable in view of high and rising oil prices 
until mid-2008, and have been characterised 
by buoyant economic growth (contrasting with 
relatively weak performance in the past, which 
is often attributed to the “resource curse”) and 
large current account and fi scal surpluses. While 
in past decades oil exporters fared relatively well 
with regard to infl ation, compared to emerging 
market and developing economies in general, 
rising infl ationary pressure has emerged as a 
mounting challenge in most countries in recent 
years, with monetary policy being constrained 
in tackling this challenge as a result of the 
prevailing exchange rate regimes. This has 
left fi scal policy to carry the main burden of 
macroeconomic stabilisation.
The macroeconomic backdrop of oil-exporting 
countries is expected to change compared 
to previous years, as oil prices have fallen 
signifi cantly since their peaks in July 2008 in 
the wake of the intensifi cation of the global 
fi nancial turmoil and as the global economy 
has entered into a downturn. This will probably 
dampen oil exporters’ growth, curb infl ationary 
pressure and reduce current account and fi scal 
surpluses in 2009 and, depending on the length 
and depth of the downturn, possibly also after 
2009. Thus recent global developments have 
brought up a different set of economic and fi scal 
issues. However, medium-term projections of 
global oil supply and demand support the notion 
that oil prices will rise again, i.e. the issues 
explored in respect of the past few years will 
remain relevant over the medium-term horizon. 
Fiscal policy in oil-exporting countries in recent 
years has been expansionary, which has been 
masked by high fi scal surpluses, pointing to 
the competing considerations and objectives 
which fi scal policy has been facing. These 
are to some extent the result of the specifi c 
long and short-term challenges of fi scal policy 
in resource-rich countries, owing to the fact 
that oil revenues are exhaustible, volatile, 
uncertain and originate from external demand. 
The major competing considerations in the 
short run have been, on one hand, cyclical, 
i.e. containing infl ation, which calls for fi scal 
restraint, and, on the other hand, primarily 
distribution-related considerations (pressures 
to immediately redistribute oil revenues to 
the general population), development-related 
spending needs in, for example, the areas of 
physical and social infrastructure (in view of 
the development level of most oil exporters) 
and international considerations (oil revenue 
recycling, in particular in the context of global 
imbalances), which call for fi scal expansion. 
In the longer run, fi scal restraint and the 
accumulation of fi nancial assets, i.e. saving 
the bulk of recent windfall revenues would be 
warranted from an intergenerational and fi scal 
sustainability point of view, while the drive 
for economic diversifi cation in many countries 
requires public investment in, for example, 
infrastructure and education. Whether and under 
what circumstances fi nancial assets and physical 
assets can be regarded as substitutes is a key 
issue in this context. Calibrating fi scal policy 
in view of these considerations and objectives 
has been a major challenge for oil-exporting 
countries over the past few years.
In terms of policy responses over the past few 
years, major oil-exporting countries differ with 
regard to the emphasis laid on competing fi scal 
considerations and objectives. On one end of 
the policy spectrum is Norway, which has been 
characterised by a high degree of fi scal restraint 
and has saved most of the windfall revenues 
of past years, i.e. cyclical considerations 
(maintaining low infl ation) and intergenerational 
objectives have clearly dominated. On the other 
end of the spectrum are Venezuela and Iran, two 
countries which have embarked on particularly 
rapid fi scal expansion, with indications that the 
focus has been less on capital expenditure than 
in other major oil exporters, and which have 
faced high and persistent infl ation. 
The bulk of oil-exporting countries, including 
those under closer review in this paper 
(Algeria, Nigeria, Russia and Saudi Arabia), 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested