mvc export to pdf : Convert pdf to jpg for application control utility azure web page winforms visual studio edf_laitner-mcdonnell-energy-efficiency-as-a-pollution-control-technology3-part584

25 
Appendix A: An Overview of the Energy Efficiency Resource 
I. What is Energy Efficiency? 
All interactions of matter involve flows of energy.  This is true whether they have to do with 
earthquakes, the movement of the planets, or the various biological and industrial processes at 
work anywhere in the world. Within the context of a regional or national economy, the 
assumption is that energy should be used as efficiently as technically and economically 
feasible. An industrial plant working two shifts a day six days a week for 50 weeks per year, for 
example, may require more than $1 million per year in purchased energy if it is to maintain 
operation.  An average American household may spend $2,000 or more per year for electricity 
and natural gas to heat, cool, and light the home as well as to power all of the appliances and 
gadgets within the house.  And an over-the-road trucker may spend $60,000 or more per year 
on fuel to haul freight an average of 100,000 miles.  Regardless of either the scale or the kind 
of activity, a more energy-efficient operation might lower overall costs for the manufacturing 
plant, for the household, and for the trucker. The question is whether the annual energy bill 
savings are worth either the cost or the effort that might be necessary to become more energy-
efficient.
69
As it turns out the U.S. economy is not especially energy-efficient. At current levels of 
consumption the U.S. economy converts about 14 percent of all the energy consumed into 
useful work – which means we waste about 86 percent of the energy resources now expended 
to maintain our economy.
70
Because of that very significant level of inefficiency, many in both 
the business and the policy community increasingly look to energy efficiency improvements as 
cost-effective investments to improve efficiency and reduce waste.  
The current system of generating and delivering electricity to homes and businesses in the 
United States is just 32 percent efficient. That is, for every three lumps of coal or other fuel 
used to generate power, the energy from only one lump is actually delivered to homes and 
businesses in the form of electricity. What America wastes in the generation of electricity is 
more than Japan needs to power its entire economy. The technologies that power the fossil-
fuel economy, for example the internal combustion engine and steam turbines, are no more 
efficient today than they were  in 1960, when  President Eisenhower was in office.
71
Laitner 
(2013) suggests that this level of inefficiency may actually constrain the greater productivity of 
the economy.
72
And yet, any number of technologies can greatly improve energy performance. 
Combined heat and power (CHP) systems, for example, can deliver efficiencies of 65 to 80 
percent or more, at a substantial economic savings.
73
And an incredible array of waste-to-
65. The energy expenditures are derived from several calculations by the author. 
66. Laitner 2013, building on Ayres and Warr 2009. 
67. Ayres, Robert U. and Edward H. Ayres. 2010. Crossing the Energy Divide: Moving from Fossil Fuel 
Dependence to a Clean-Energy Future. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Wharton School of Publishing. 
68. Laitner 2013. 
69. Chittum, Anna and Terry Sullivan. 2012. Coal Retirements and the CHP Investment Opportunity. ACEEE 
Report IE123. Washington, DC: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy. 
Convert pdf to jpg for - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch convert pdf to jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg
Convert pdf to jpg for - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change pdf to jpg; change pdf file to jpg online
26 
energy and recycled energy technologies can further increase overall efficiency and save 
money.
74
II. Historical Impact of Energy Efficiency 
As one of the richest and more technologically advanced regions of the world, the United 
States has expanded its economic output by more than three-fold since 1970.  Per capita 
incomes are also twice as large today compared to incomes in 1970. Notably, however, the 
demand for energy and power resources grew by only 40 percent during the same period.
75
This decoupling of economic growth and energy consumption is a function of increased energy 
productivity: in effect, the ability to generate greater economic output (that is, more goods and 
services), but to do so with less energy.  Because these past gains were achieved with an 
often ad hoc approach to energy efficiency improvements, there is compelling evidence to 
suggest that even greater energy productivity benefits can be achieved.  Indeed, the evidence 
suggests that since 1970, energy efficiency in its many different forms has met three-fourths of 
the new demands for energy-related goods and services while new energy supplies have 
provided only one-fourth of the new energy-related demands.
76
But energy efficiency has 
been an invisible resource. Unlike a new power plant or a new oil well, we don’t see energy 
efficiency at work.  A new car that gets 25 miles per gallon, for example, may not seem all that 
much different than a car that gets 40 miles or more per gallon.  And yet, the first car will 
consume 400 gallons of gasoline to go 10,000 miles in a single year while the second car will 
need only 250 gallons per year.
77
In effect, energy efficiency in this example is the energy we 
don’t use to travel 10,000 miles per year. More broadly, energy efficiency may be thought of as 
the cost-effective investments in the energy we don’t use either to produce or even increase 
the level of goods and services within the economy. 
III. The Cost-Effective Potential for the Energy Efficiency Resource 
Can the substantial investments that might be required to obtain more energy-efficient 
technologies save money for businesses and consumers?  Here we turn to the evidence to 
provide different views of this question. The Lazard Asset Management firm (2013) provides a 
70. Bailey, Owen and Ernst Worrell. 2005. Clean Energy Technologies A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for 
Electricity Generation. LBNL-57451. Berkeley, CA: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. 
71. These and other economic and energy-related data cited are the author’s calculations as they are drawn from 
various resources available from the Energy Information Administration (2013a and 2013b). 
72. Laitner 2013. 
77. In August 2012 the Department of Transportation and the Environmental Protection Agency finalized federal 
car and light truck fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions standards for model years 2017 to 2025. The 
standards, together with those previously adopted for model years 2012 to 2016, mean an 80 percent increase to 
more than 50 miles per gallon for the average model year 2025 vehicle from the 2011 CAFE (Corporate Average 
Fuel Economy) requirement of 27.6 miles per gallon (Langer 2012). A separate study by the BlueGreen Alliance 
and the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy determined that the new 2025 fuel economy 
standards would be cost-effective and produce a gain of 576,000 jobs (Busch et al. 2012). The jobs provided by 
the new fuel economy standards are at the same scale as the jobs that likely would provided by energy efficiency 
improvements in the use of electricity as suggested in the text of the main report. 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert pdf to gif or jpg; convert pdf document to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF files to JPG.
convert pdf file to jpg format; batch pdf to jpg converter
27 
detailed review of the various costs associated with electricity generation expenditures.
78
They 
note, for instance, that new coal and nuclear power plants might cost an average of 8 to 14 
cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity.  The costs for various renewable energy resources 
such as wind energy or photovoltaic energy systems (i.e., solar cells that convert sunlight 
directly into electricity) range from 6 to 20 cents per kWh.  And both Lazard (2013) and the 
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) estimate a range of energy 
efficiency measures that might cost the equivalent of 3 to 5 cents per kWh of electricity service 
demands.
79
McKinsey & Company (2007) assessed the energy efficiency resource as having 
at least a 10 percent return on energy efficiency investments.
80
When spread out over an 
annual $170 billion energy efficiency market potential, McKinsey suggests an average 17 
percent return might be expected across that spread of annual investments.
81
A subsequent 
study suggests that through 2020 there is sufficient cost-effective opportunity to reduce our 
nation’s energy use by more than 20 percent – if we choose to invest in the more efficient use 
of our energy resources.
82
Similarly, the AEC (1991) and the Energy Innovations (1997) reports show a benefit-cost ratio 
that also approached two to one.
83
More recently, the Union of Concerned Scientists published 
a detailed portfolio of technology and program options that would lower U.S. heat-trapping 
greenhouse gas emissions 56 percent below 2005 levels in 2030.
84
The result of their analysis 
indicated an annual $414 billion savings for U.S. households, vehicle owners, businesses, and 
industries by 2030.  After subtracting the annual $160 billion costs (constant 2006 dollars) of 
the various policy and technology options, the net savings are on the order of $255 billion per 
year.  Over the entire 2010 through 2030 study period, the net cumulative savings to 
consumers and businesses were calculated to be on the order of $1.7 trillion under their so-
called Blueprint case.  
Most recently, Laitner et al. (2012) documented an array of untapped cost-effective energy 
efficiency resources roughly equivalent to 250 billion barrels of oil.
85
That is a scale sufficient to 
enable the U.S. to reduce total energy needs by about one-half compared to standard 
reference case projections for the year 2050. These productivity gains could generate from 1.3 
74. Lazard, 2013. Lazard, Ltd. “Levelized Cost of Energy Analysis – Version 7.0.” September, 2013. 
75. Id.; Elliott, R. Neal, Rachel Gold, and Sara Hayes. 2011. Avoiding a Train Wreck: Replacing Old Coal Plants 
with Energy Efficiency. ACEEE White Paper. Washington, DC: American Council for an Energy-Efficient 
Economy. 
76. McKinsey. 2007. Reducing U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions: How Much at What Cost? The Conference 
Board and McKinsey & Company. 
77. Id. 
78. McKinsey. 2009. Unlocking Energy Efficiency in the U.S. Economy. McKinsey & Company. 
79. Alliance to Save Energy, American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Natural Resources Defense 
Council, Union of Concerned Scientists, and Tellus Institute. 1991. America's Energy Choices: Investing in a 
Strong Economy and a Clean Environment. Cambridge, MA: Union of Concerned Scientists; Energy Innovations. 
1997. Energy Innovations: A Prosperous Path to a Clean Environment. Washington, DC: Alliance to Save Energy, 
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Natural Resources Defense Council, Tellus Institute, and 
Union of Concerned Scientists. 
80. Cleetus Rachel, Stephen Clemmer, and David Friedman. 2009. Climate 2030: A National Blueprint for a 
Clean Energy Economy. Cambridge, MA: Union of Concerned Scientists. 
81. Laitner, John A. “Skip,” Steven Nadel, Harvey Sachs, R. Neal Elliott, and Siddiq Khan. 2012 The Long-Term 
Energy Efficiency Potential: What the Evidence Suggests, ACEEE Research Report E104, Washington, DC: 
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy. 2012. 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
convert online pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg online
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
batch convert pdf to jpg online; .pdf to jpg converter online
28 
to 1.9 million jobs while saving all residential and business consumers a net $400 billion per 
year, or the equivalent of about $2,600 per household annually (in 2010 dollars). Indeed, in 
World Energy Outlook 2012, the International Energy Agency (IEA 2012) highlighted the 
potential for energy efficiency to save 18 percent of the 2010 global energy consumption by 
2035.  More critically, the IEA notes that Global GDP would be 0.4 percent higher in 2035 as a 
result of those efficiency improvements. 
There are two final aspects of the evidence to briefly review.  The first is associated with the 
non-energy benefits that typically result from energy efficiency investments.  The second 
reflects the changes one might normally expect in the cost and performance of technologies 
over time.   
When energy efficiency measures are implemented in industrial, commercial, or residential 
settings, several "non-energy" benefits such as maintenance cost savings and revenue 
increases from greater production can often result in addition to the anticipated energy 
savings.  The magnitude of non-energy benefits from energy efficiency measures is significant.  
These added savings or productivity gains range from reduced maintenance costs and lower 
waste of both water and chemicals to increased product yield and greater product quality.  In 
one study of 52 industrial efficiency upgrades, all undertaken in separate industrial facilities, 
Worrell et al. (2003) found that these non-energy benefits were sufficiently large that they 
lowered the aggregate simple payback for energy efficiency projects from 4.2 years to 1.9 
years.
86
Unfortunately, these non-energy benefits from energy efficiency measures are often 
omitted from conventional performance metrics.  This leads, in turn, to overly modest payback 
calculations and an imperfect understanding of the full impact of additional efficiency 
investments.  
Several other studies have quantified non-energy benefits from energy efficiency measures 
and numerous others have reported linkages from non-energy benefits and completed energy 
efficiency projects. In one, the simple payback from energy savings alone for 81 separate 
industrial energy efficiency projects was less than 2 years, indicating annual returns higher 
than 50 percent. When non-energy benefits were factored into the analysis, the simple 
payback fell to just under one year.
87
In residential buildings, non-energy benefits have been 
estimated to represent between 10 to 50 percent of household energy savings.
88
If the 
additional benefits from energy efficiency measures were captured in conventional 
performance models, such figures would make them more compelling.  Building on that 
perspective, a new assessment by the Regulatory Assistance Project suggests there is, in fact, 
a “layer cake of benefits from electric energy efficiency”.
89
The layers or array of benefits falls 
82. Worrell, Ernst, John A. Laitner, Michael Ruth, and Hodayah Finman. 2003. "Productivity Benefits of Industrial 
Energy Efficiency Measures." Energy (2003), 28, 1081-98. 
83. Lung, Robert Bruce, Aimee McKane, Robert Leach, Donald Marsh. 2005. “Ancillary Benefits and Production 
Benefits in the Evaluation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Measures.” Proceedings of the 2005 Summer Study on 
Energy Efficiency in Industry. Washington, DC: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy.   
84. Amann, Jennifer. 2006. Valuation of Non-Energy Benefits to Determine Cost-Effectiveness of Whole House 
Retrofit Programs: A Literature Review. ACEEE Report A061. Washington, DC: American Council for an Energy-
Efficient Economy. 
85. Lazar, Jim and Ken Colburn. 2013. Recognizing the Full Value of Energy Efficiency. Montpelier, VT: 
Regulatory Assistance Project, at 10. 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf to jpg c#; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; convert pdf pictures to jpg
29 
into three categories: utility system benefits, participant benefits, and societal benefits – each 
with six different types of positive returns.  Using information provided by Efficiency Vermont 
as one example, Lazar and Colburn found that the mix of energy efficiency benefits typically 
included in utility revenue requirements approach 7-8 cents/kWh, but the full set of efficiency 
benefits could be as high as 18 cents/kWh.
90
Laitner et al. (2013) suggest that new business 
models are needed to fully capture the complete array of benefits.
91
As a strong complement to the likelihood of large-scale non-energy benefits typically omitted 
from most climate policy assessments, there is also a significant body of evidence that 
indicates that technology is hardly static and non-dynamic. The rapid technological change 
seen especially in semiconductor-enabled technologies has led to cheaper, higher performing, 
and more energy-efficient technologies.
92
The increasing penetration of information and 
communication technologies interacting with energy-related behaviors and products suggests 
that energy efficiency resources may become progressively cheaper and more dynamic 
through the 21st century.
93
Given this and many other comparable studies, one might safely 
conclude that progress in the cost and performance of energy efficient technologies will 
continue, and that new public policies will greatly increase the continued rate of 
improvement.
94
We can extend the issue of cost effectiveness even further to examine policy scenarios rather 
than discrete technologies.  Laitner and McKinney (2008) provided a meta-review of 48 past 
policy studies that were undertaken primarily at the state or regional level.
95
The set of studies 
included in this assessment generally examined the costs of economy-wide efficiency 
investments made over a 15 to 25 year time horizon. The analysis found that even when both 
86. In many ways the landmark volume, Small Is Profitable: The Hidden Economic Benefits of Making Electrical 
Resources the Right Size, by Lovins et al. (2002) underscores the many benefits which are mostly excluded from 
marketplace transactions.  From the Small Is Profitable website: The report describes 207 ways “in which the size 
of ‘electrical resources’ – devices that make, save, or story electricity – affects their economic value. It finds that 
properly considering the economic benefits of ‘distributed’ (decentralized electrical resources typically raises their 
value by a large factor, often approximately tenfold, by improving system planning, utility construction and 
operation, and service quality, and by avoiding societal costs.”  See, http://www.smallisprofitable.org/
87. Laitner, John A. “Skip,” Matthew T. McDonnell and Heidi M. Keller.  2013. “Shifting Demand: From the 
Economic Imperative of Energy Efficiency to Business Models that Engage and Empower Consumers.” In End of 
Electricity Demand Growth: How Energy Efficiently Can Bring an End to the Need for More Power Plants, 
Fereidoon P. Sioshansi (editor), Elsevier, 2013. 
88. Laitner, John A. "Skip", Christopher Poland Knight, Vanessa McKinney, and Karen Ehrhardt-Martinez. 2009. 
Semiconductor Technologies: The Potential to Revolutionize U.S. Energy Productivity. Washington, DC: 
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy. 
89. Laitner, John A. "Skip" and Karen Ehrhardt-Martinez. 2008. Information and Communication Technologies: 
The Power of Productivity; How ICT Sectors Are Transforming the Economy While Driving Gains in Energy 
Productivity. Washington, DC: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy. 
90. McKinsey. 2009. Unlocking Energy Efficiency in the U.S. Economy. McKinsey & Company; Koomey, 
Jonathan. 2008. “Testimony of Jonathan Koomey, Ph.D. Before the Joint Economic Committee of the United 
States Congress,” For a hearing on Efficiency: The Hidden Secret to Solving Our Energy Crisis.”  Washington, 
DC: Joint Economic Committee of the United States Congress.  June 30, 2008. 
91. Laitner, John A. “Skip” and Vanessa McKinney. 2008. Positive Returns: State Energy Efficiency Analyses Can 
Inform U.S. Energy Policy Assessments. ACEEE Report E084. Washington, DC: American Council for an Energy-
Efficient Economy. 
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
best pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf file into jpg format
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. Copyright © <2000-2015> by <RasterEdge.com>. All Rights Reserved.
convert pdf file to jpg; convert pdf into jpg online
30 
program costs and technology investments were compared, the savings appeared to be twice 
the cost of the suggested policies.   
IV. Overcoming Barriers to Improving Energy Efficiency 
Although some economists have questioned the magnitude of the energy efficiency resource, 
close examination of the evidence indicates that the resource is in fact vast. Allcott and 
Greenstone (2012), for example, suggest that “recent empirical work in a variety of contexts 
implies that on average the magnitude of profitable unexploited investment opportunities is 
much smaller than engineering-accounting studies suggest.”
96
In effect, they pose the central 
economic question, “Is there an Energy Efficiency Gap?” In other words, is energy efficiency a 
sufficiently large, cost-effective resource that can be relied upon as a meaningful energy policy 
option?(Allcott and Greenstone 2012). In fact, the issue was rigorously explored as early as 
1995. Levine et al. (1995), for example, examined this issue in a significant journal article, 
“Energy Efficiency Policy and Market Failures.”
97
After a careful review they concluded, “[w]e 
believe that energy efficiency policies aimed at improving energy efficiency at a lower cost than 
society currently pays for energy services represent good public policy. Programs that lead to 
increased economic efficiency as well as energy efficiency should continue to be pursued.” 
More recently, Nadel and Langer (2012), in a thoughtful review of Allcott and Greenstone, 
suggest that “while the authors have some useful points to make, in general they interpret 
available data in ways that best support their points, downplaying other important findings in 
the various articles they cite.”
98
Nadel and Langer argue that a fuller consideration of the 
evidence shows that there is in fact a large, cost-effective energy efficiency resource available 
to be harvested. 
Another relevant area of inquiry examines why cost-effective efficiency opportunities remain 
unexploited given the cost-savings potential.  There is a range of market imperfections, market 
barriers, and real world behaviors that leaves substantial room for public policy to induce 
behavioral changes that produce economic benefits. One classic example is the misaligned 
incentive that exists for those living in rental units when the renter pays the energy bills but the 
landlord purchases large energy-using appliances such as refrigerators and water heaters. In 
this case, the purchaser of the durable good does not reap the benefits of greater energy 
efficiency and has no incentive to select highly efficient appliances. The Market Advisory 
Committee of the California Air Resources Board (2007) provides a short overview of this and 
other key market failures.
99, 100
A deeper exploration of the types of market barriers is beyond 
92. Allcott Hunt and Michael Greenstone. 2012. “ Is There an Energy Efficiency Gap?”  Journal of Economic 
Perspectives 26 (1) : 3-28 
93. Levine, Mark D. Jonathan G. Koomey, James E. McMahon, Alan H. Sanstad, and Eric Hirst. 1995, "Energy 
Efficiency Policy and Market Failures." Annual Review of Energy and the Environment 20: 535-555. 
94. Nadel, Steven and Therese Langer. 2012. Comments on the July 2012 Revision of “Is There an Energy 
Efficiency Gap?” ACEEE White Paper. Washington, DC: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy.   
95. California Air Resources Board. 2007. Recommendations for Designing a Greenhouse Gas Cap-and-Trade 
System for California. http://www.energy.ca.gov/2007publications/ARB-1000-2007-007/ARB-1000-2007-007.PDF. 
Sacramento, Calif.: California Air Resources Board, Market Advisory Committee. 
96. Following are examples of important market failures: (1) Step-Change Technology Development—where 
temporary incentives will be needed to encourage companies to deploy new technologies at large scale to the 
public good, because there is otherwise excessive technology, market, and policy risk. Examples of remedies are 
31 
the scope of this working paper, but others have done work to map this terrain.
101
A flexible 
framework to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from existing fossil fuel power plants that 
empowers states and companies to invest in energy efficiency to reduce pollution would 
provide an important opportunity to eliminate these barriers. 
One important implication of the literature on market imperfections and energy efficiency is that 
price signals alone may not drive optimal levels of energy efficiency investment.  This concept 
was explored by Hanson and Laitner (2004).
102
In one of the few top-down models that 
explicitly reflects both policies and behavioral changes as a complement to pricing signals, this 
study found that the combination of both price and non-pricing policies actually resulted in a 
significantly greater level of energy efficiency gains and a lower carbon allowance price to 
achieve the same level of emissions reductions, thereby achieving an overall reduction in the 
costs of achieving those reductions. 
Appendix B: Methodology of the DEEPER Modeling System 
To evaluate the macroeconomic impacts of reductions in fossil fuel fired plant emissions from 
demand-side efficiency improvements, we use the proprietary Dynamic Energy Efficiency 
Policy Evaluation Routine, or DEEPER model. The model was developed by John A. “Skip” 
Laitner and has a 22-year history of use and development, though it was renamed “DEEPER” 
in 2007. It was most recently used in a study for the BlueGreen Alliance and the American 
Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) evaluating the overall job impacts of the 
recently enacted fuel economy standards.
103
The DEEPER Modeling System is a quasi-dynamic input-output (I/O) model
104
of the U.S. 
economy that draws upon social accounting matrices
105
from the MIG, Inc. (formerly the 
Minnesota IMPLAN Group),
106
energy use data from the U.S. Energy Information 
Administration’s Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), and employment and labor data from the 
renewable portfolio obligations, biofuel requirements, and California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard. (2) Fragmented 
supply chains—where economically rational investments (for example, energy efficiency in buildings) are not 
executed because of the complex supply chain. Examples of remedies are building codes. (3) Consumer 
behavior—where individuals have demonstrated high discount rates for investment in energy efficiency that is 
inconsistent with the public good. Examples of remedies are vehicle and appliance efficiency standards and 
rebate programs (California Air Resources Board 2007, p.19). 
97. See, for example, Levine et al. 1995 previously referenced, but also Brown (2001); Levinson and Niemann 
(2004); Sathaye and Murtishaw (2004); Murtishaw and Sathaye (2006); Geller et al. (2006); Brown et al. (2009). 
98. Hanson, Donald A. and John A. “Skip” Laitner. 2004. "An Integrated Analysis of Policies that Increase 
Investments in Advanced Energy-Efficient/Low-Carbon Technologies." Energy Economics 26:739-755.  
99. Busch, Chris, John Laitner, Rob McCulloch, Ivana Stosic. 2012. Gearing Up: Smart Standards Create Good 
Jobs Building Cleaner Cars. Washington, DC: BlueGreen Alliance and the American Council for an Energy-
Efficient Economy (Available at: http://www.bluegreenalliance.org/news/publications/gearing-up). 
101. Input-output models use economic data to study the relationships among producers, suppliers, and 
consumers.  They are often used to show how interactions among all three impact the macroeconomy. 
102. A social accounting matrix is a data framework for an economy that represents how different institutions — 
households, industries, businesses, and governments — all trade goods and services with one another. 
103. See http://implan.com/V4/Index.php.   
32 
Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The Excel-based tool contains approximately eight 
interdependent worksheets.   The model functions as laid out in the flow diagram below: 
DEEPER results are driven by adjustments to energy service demands and alternative 
investment patterns resulting from projected changes in policies and prices between baseline 
and policy scenarios.  The model is capable of evaluating policies at the national level through 
2050.  However, given uncertainty surrounding future economic conditions and the life of the 
impacts resulting from the policies analyzed, it is often used to evaluate out 15–20 years.  
Although the DEEPER Model, like most I/O models, is not a general equilibrium model,
107
it 
does provide accounting detail that balances changes in investments and expenditures within 
the economy. With consideration for goods or services that are imported, it balances the 
variety of changes across all sectors of the economy.
108
The Macroeconomic Module contains the factors of production — including capital (or 
investment), labor, and energy resources — that drive the U.S. economy for a given “base 
year.”  DEEPER uses a set of economic accounts that specify how different sectors of the 
economy buy (purchase inputs) from and sell (deliver outputs) to each other.
109
The Macroeconomic Module translates the selected different policy scenarios, including 
necessary program spending and research and development (R&D) expenditures, into an 
annual array of physical energy impacts, investment flows, and energy expenditures over the 
desired period of analysis.  DEEPER evaluates the policy-driven investment path for the 
various financing strategies, as well as the net energy bill savings anticipated over the study 
period. It also evaluates the impacts of avoided or reduced investments and expenditures 
otherwise required by the electric and natural gas sectors.  
104. General equilibrium models operate on the assumption that a set of prices exists for an economy to ensure 
that supply and demand are in an overall equilibrium. 
105. When both equilibrium and dynamic input-output models use the same technology assumptions, both 
models should generate a reasonably comparable set of outcomes.  See Hanson and Laitner (2005) for a 
diagnostic assessment that reached that conclusion. 
106. Further details on this set of linkages can be found in Hanson and Laitner (2009). 
33 
The resulting positive and negative changes in spending and investments in each year are 
converted into sector-specific changes in aggregate demand.
110
These results then drive the 
I/O matrices utilizing a predictive algebraic expression known as the Leontief Inverse Matrix.
111
Employment quantities are adjusted annually according to assumptions about the anticipated 
labor productivity improvements based on forecasts from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.  The 
DEEPER Macroeconomic Module traces how changes in spending will ripple through the U.S. 
economy in each year of the assessment period.  The end result is a net change between the 
reference and policy scenarios in jobs, income, and value-added,
112
which is typically 
measured as Gross Domestic Product (GDP) or value-added Gross Regional Product (GRP) 
for the study region (e.g., the national, state, or local economies).  
Like all economic models, DEEPER has strengths and weaknesses.  It is robust by 
comparison to some I/O models because it can account for price and quantity changes over 
time and is sensitive to shifts in investment flows.  It also reflects sector-specific labor 
intensities across the U.S economy.  However, it is important to remember when interpreting 
results for the DEEPER model that the results rely heavily on the quality of the information that 
is provided and the modeler’s own assumptions and judgment. The results are unique to the 
specified policy design.  The results reflect differences between scenarios in a future year, and 
like any prediction of the future, they are subject to uncertainty. 
109. This is the total demand for final goods and services in the economy at a given time and price level. 
110. For a more complete discussion of these concepts, see Miller and Blair (2009).  
111. This is the market value of all final goods and services produced within a country in a given period. 
34 
Appendix A and B Bibliography 
[AEC]  Alliance to Save Energy, American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Natural 
Resources Defense Council, Union of Concerned Scientists, and Tellus Institute. 1991. 
America's Energy Choices: Investing in a Strong Economy and a Clean Environment. 
Cambridge, MA: Union of Concerned Scientists. 
Allcott Hunt and Michael Greenstone. 2012. “ Is There an Energy Efficiency Gap?”  Journal of 
Economic Perspectives 26 (1) : 3-28 
Amann, Jennifer. 2006. Valuation of Non-Energy Benefits to Determine Cost-Effectiveness of 
Whole House Retrofit Programs: A Literature Review. ACEEE Report A061. 
Washington, DC: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy. 
Ayres, Robert U. and Benjamin Warr.  2009. The Economic Growth Engine: How Energy and 
Work Drive Material Prosperity.  Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, Inc.   
Ayres, Robert U. and Edward H. Ayres. 2010. Crossing the Energy Divide: Moving from Fossil 
Fuel Dependence to a Clean-Energy Future. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Wharton School 
of Publishing. 
Bailey, Owen and Ernst Worrell. 2005. Clean Energy Technologies A Preliminary Inventory of 
the Potential for Electricity Generation. LBNL-57451. Berkeley, CA: Lawrence Berkeley 
National Laboratory. 
Brown, Marilyn A. 2001. “Market Failures and Barriers as a Basis for Clean Energy Policies.” 
Energy Policy, 29 (14): 1197–207.  
Brown, Marilyn A., Jess Chandler, Melissa V. Lapsa, and Moonis Ally. 2009. Making Homes 
Part of the Climate Solution: Policy Options to Promote Energy Efficiency. ORNL /TM-
2009/104. Oak Ridge, Tenn.: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 
Busch, Chris, John Laitner, Rob McCulloch, Ivana Stosic. 2012. Gearing Up: Smart Standards 
Create Good Jobs Building Cleaner Cars. Washington, DC: BlueGreen Alliance and the 
American 
Council 
for 
an 
Energy-Efficient 
Economy 
(Available 
at: 
http://www.bluegreenalliance.org/news/publications/gearing-up). 
California Air Resources Board. 2007. Recommendations for Designing a Greenhouse Gas 
Cap-and-Trade System for California. http://www.energy.ca.gov/2007publications/ARB-
1000-2007-007/ARB-1000-2007-007.PDF. Sacramento, Calif.: California Air Resources 
Board, Market Advisory Committee. 
Chittum, Anna and Terry Sullivan. 2012. Coal Retirements and the CHP Investment 
Opportunity. ACEEE Report IE123. Washington, DC: American Council for an Energy-
Efficient Economy. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested