EDORA 
European Development 
Opportunities for Rural Areas 
Applied Research 2013/1/2 
Final Report 
Parts A, B and C 
August 2011 
Batch convert pdf to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf image to jpg image; change pdf to jpg on
Batch convert pdf to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
best pdf to jpg converter online; .pdf to jpg
This report presents the final results of an 
Applied Research Project conducted within the 
framework of the ESPON 2013 Programme, 
partly financed by the European Regional 
Development Fund. 
The partnership behind the ESPON Programme 
consists of the EU Commission and the Member 
States of the EU27, plus Iceland, Liechtenstein, 
Norway and Switzerland. Each partner is 
represented in the ESPON Monitoring 
Committee. 
This report does not necessarily reflect the 
opinion of the members of the Monitoring 
Committee. 
Information on the ESPON Programme and 
projects can be found on www.espon.eu
The web site provides the possibility to 
download and examine the most recent 
documents produced by finalised and ongoing 
ESPON projects. 
This basic report exists only in an electronic 
version. 
ISBN number - 978-99959-684-1-0 
© ESPON & UHI Millennium Institute, 2011. 
Printing, reproduction or quotation is authorised 
provided the source is acknowledged and a 
copy is forwarded to the ESPON Coordination 
Unit in Luxembourg. 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert multi page pdf to jpg; convert pdf file into jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
VB.NET components for batch convert high resolution images from PDF. Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap
pdf to jpg; pdf to jpeg
List of authors:
Andrew Copus (Editor) 
UHI Millennium Institute, Inverness, UK 
Paul Courtney 
University of Gloucestershire, Cheltenham, 
UK 
Thomas Dax 
BABF, Vienna, Austria 
David Meredith 
TEAGASC, Dublin, Ireland 
Joan Noguera 
University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain 
Hilary Talbot and Mark Shucksmith Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK 
Acknowledgements 
The list of authors above does not reflect the valuable contributions made by all partners in the 
EDORA consortium. The full list of researchers who have contributed ideas, perspectives and 
empirical material may be found in the Forward below. The authors would also like to express 
their gratitude to the Expert Group, and the Sounding Board, who have provided extensive 
advice and guidance. The members of the Expert Group are; Elena Saraceno, John Bryden, 
Klaus Kunzmann, Michal Lostak, and Patrick Salez. The members of the Sounding Board are: 
Minas Angelides and Cliff Hague. 
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
convert pdf file to jpg online; convert pdf to high quality jpg
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Powerful .NET control to batch convert PDF documents to tiff format in Visual C# .NET program. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images.
changing pdf to jpg on; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 
A-D Accumulating-Depleting 
CC 
Consumption Countryside 
CWE Central-West Europe (BE, DE, FR, IE, LU, NL, AT, UK) 
D-P Dijkstra-Poelman (Enhanced urban-rural typology of NUTS 3 regions) 
GDP Gross Domestic Product 
IA 
Intermediate Accessible 
IR 
Intermediate Remote 
ISEZ Intermediate Socio-Economic Zone 
NACE Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community 
(Nomenclature statistique des activités économiques dans la Communauté européenne). 
NMS12 
The New Member States of Central and Eastern Europe plus Malta and Cyprus 
NRE New Rural Economy 
MED Mediterranean Europe (GR, ES, PT, IT, CY, MT) 
MS Member State 
NRP New Rural Paradigm 
PPS Purchasing Power Standard 
PR 
Predominantly Rural 
PRA Predominantly Rural Accessible 
PRR Predominantly Rural Remote 
PU 
Predominantly Urban 
SGI Services of General Interest 
WP Working Paper (see Annex 1) 
Standard Abbreviations for Country Names:
AT 
Austria 
BE 
Belgium 
BG 
Bulgaria 
CH 
Switzerland 
CY 
Cyprus 
CZ 
Czech Republic 
DE 
Germany 
DK 
Denmark 
EE 
Estonia 
ES 
Spain 
FI 
Finland 
FR 
France 
GR Greece 
HU 
Hungary 
IE 
Ireland 
IT 
Italy 
LI 
Liechtenstein 
LT 
Lithuania 
LU 
Luxemburg 
LV 
Latvia 
MT 
Malta 
NO Norway 
NL 
Netherlands 
PL 
Poland 
PT 
Portugal 
RO Romania 
SE 
Sweden 
SI 
Slovenia 
SK 
Slovakia 
TR 
Turkey 
UK 
United Kingdom 
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
and Benefits. Powerful image converter to convert images of Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after
advanced pdf to jpg converter; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
speed JPEG to GIF Converter, faster than other JPG Converters; Automatically sort the file name when you convert the files in batch; Storing conversion
change pdf to jpg online; best pdf to jpg converter online
Glossary. 
Agglomeration economies: - (Otherwise known as “external economies of scale”.) Cost savings 
and other benefits (such as a shared labour pool) derived by firms from being in close 
geographical proximity to other firms with which they do business, supporting institutions etc. It 
is generally assumed that firms located in centres of economic activity benefit from 
agglomeration economies, whilst rural businesses do not. 
Commodification: Using public goods as a basis for economic activities. In a rural context this 
could mean, for example, using the landscape or wildlife as a basis for recreation or tourism. 
Connexity: - A term conveying the increasing interconnectedness, over greater geographical 
distances, of many aspects of everyday life, (work, consumer activity, recreation and leisure), 
business and economic activity, governance, and so on. 
Consumption Countryside: - Generally this term is used to describe areas where the rural 
economy is no longer dominated by the production of food and fibre, but where countryside 
public goods, environmental or cultural assets, or local quality produce form the basis of 
“consumption” activities enjoyed by urban visitors, such as leisure, recreation, hospitality, and 
so on. More specifically, within the EDORA Structural Typology, the term identifies regions in 
which the primary sector no longer accounts for more than the EU27 average share of GVA, but 
in which (indicators suggest) countryside and environment public goods still play a strong role in 
the economy. 
Counter-urbanisation: - Migration (usually for lifestyle reasons) out of cities and towns into the 
countryside; the reverse of urbanisation, which is also continuing to affect other parts of Europe. 
Cumulative causation: - A term describing both the self perpetuating vicious cycle of decline 
which tends to afflict sparsely populated or remote rural areas, (involving depopulation, 
declining services and opportunities for economic activity, depletion of social capital etc.) and 
the reverse “virtuous circle” of growth in areas which, for whatever reason, begin to grow. 
Ecological modernisation: - A term to describe the situation where agri-environment policy leads 
to a “win-win” situation, where changes in farming practices result in both environmental and 
income benefits. 
Embeddedness: - This describes the way in which some firms have a dense network of links to 
the area in which they are located. The links may be in the form of transactions, or a range of 
social and informal interactions. 
Euclidean space: - Space defined by geographic distance (rather than relationships, as in 
“relational space”). 
Glocalisation: - A term describing a concurrent increase in both localised and global interaction 
(jumping over intermediate spatial levels). 
Innovative Milieu: - A term used to describe a group of dynamic firms, together with the local 
context, including supporting institutions, governance, labour market, entrepreneurial culture 
and social capital. The idea is that the milieu is an organic whole which nurtures innovation and 
entrepreneurship. 
Institutional Capacity: - A term for the collective effectiveness and capability of the full range of 
public sector institutions, organisations and other (governance) actors within a region, as 
determined by their collective expertise, powers, and their ability to work together. 
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
An advanced .NET control able to batch convert PDF documents to image formats in C# Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
convert from pdf to jpg; convert multipage pdf to jpg
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Select "Convert to DICOM"; Select "Start" to start conversion How to Start Batch JPEG Conversion to DICOM. JPEG to DICOM Converter first; Load JPG images from
convert pdf file to jpg file; convert pdf document to jpg
Institutional Thickness: - A term used to describe close interaction, shared objectives and 
values, and “mores” between local agencies, institutions and businesses. This is broader than 
institutional capacity in the sense that it takes in private sector and third sector actors, and 
places particular emphasis upon shared objectives, values and “ways of doing things”. Thus 
“institutions” is used in two senses (i.e. actors and “mores”). 
Meta-Narrative: A commonly occurring ensemble of “story-lines” of rural change. 
Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP): - A term to describe the fact that spatial patterns shown 
by statistical maps are very much affected by the size, shape and configuration of the regions 
for which data is provided.   
Multifunctionality: - a similar concept to “Post-Productivist”, but emphasising the idea that 
farming cannot produce food and fibre without also producing “joint products”, such as 
environmental and countryside public goods, sustaining local communities and culture. These 
are “public goods” for which, it is argued, farmers should be compensated. From the 1990s 
onwards multifunctionality became a justification for continued (production neutral) financial 
support for agriculture. 
Neo-endogenous approaches: - Local development programmes which are essentially “bottom-
up”, but which benefit from “top-down” support in the form of advice, guidance, perhaps 
administrative and technical assistance. The LEADER programmes are often cited as an 
example. 
New Public Management: - A term sometimes used to describe a range of ways in which 
competitive or “neo-liberal” principles have been introduce into the management of the public 
sector, with the aim of achieving greater efficiency and cost savings. 
New Rural Economy: The outcome of structural change and diversification, away from a 
dependence upon primary industries, and towards expansion of secondary, and tertiary 
activities, including high technology industries and market services. 
New Rural Paradigm: - A statement about how rural development policy should be carried out, 
put forward by the OECD, which brings together a range of pre-existing ideas, such as territorial 
focus, neo-endogenous approaches, partnerships for implementation and so on, to provide an 
integrated framework. 
Pluriactivity: - Multiple job holding (usually by farmers). 
Productivist and Post-Productivist: - These terms usually refer to styles of farming or agricultural 
policy, in a historical sequence Productivist agriculture (and policy) sees its role in terms of 
maximising output of food and fibre, through technological efficiency, (based on scale and 
improved structures) and economic competitiveness. Post-productivist agriculture adds other 
objectives, relating to environment and countryside public goods, diversification, stewardship, 
cultural and community benefits, and so on. Para and Peri-Productivist are more specific, 
descriptive types of farming, both present, in different parts of Europe, today. The former 
describes large scale agriculture, with a continuing emphasis upon technical efficiency, labour 
productivity, and economic competitiveness in commodity outputs, but tempered by agri-
environment and animal welfare policy/regulation. The latter is characterised by small scale 
(perhaps family) farming, with a high incidence of pluriactivity, diversification, and 
multifunctionality. 
Regional enlargement: - A process of increasing the size of local government or administrative 
regions, often justified in terms of extension of functional areas such as commuting zones, but 
usually with the underlying aim of obtaining economies of scale in service provision. 
Relational space: - A term which conveys the idea that increasingly it is the strength of 
relationship, and the degree of common interest, which determines the value of a link in a 
network, rather than the geographical distance between the nodes. 
Segmented labour markets – this term describes the division of local labour markets into two 
“layers”, with relatively little movement between them. The upper segment is characterised by 
high status jobs, with well qualified employees, long contracts and career advancement, while 
the lower segment has short term, part-time, low paid jobs, few qualifications, insecurity and 
lack of career advancement potential. 
Story-line: An individual facet of rural change, which forms part of a meta-narrative. 
The Project State: - A term used to describe the increasing use of transitory partnership 
arrangements based on short term contracts, awarded on the basis of competitive tendering, to 
deliver policy at a local level. 
Third Sector: - Actors which do not fit into either Public or Private sectors, including voluntary 
organisations, cooperatives, social enterprises, charities etc. 
Untraded interdependencies: non-transaction linkages between firms (including exchange of 
information and various forms of cooperation). 
The EDORA research team comprises 16 partners from 12 EU Member States: 
No. Partner 
MS 
Principal Researchers 
1 UHI Millennium Institute 
UK 
Andrew Copus 
2 Nordregio - Nordic Centre for Spatial Development 
SE 
Petri Kahila 
3 Newcastle University 
UK 
Mark Shucksmith, Hilary Talbot 
4 University of Valencia 
ES 
Joan Noguera 
5 Research Committee - University of Patras 
GR 
Dimitris Skuras 
6 The Irish Agriculture and Food Development Authority 
IE 
David Meredith 
7 University of Gloucestershire 
UK 
Paul Courtney 
8 University of Ljubljana 
SI 
Majda Cernic 
Johann Heinrich von Thünen-Institut, Federal Research 
Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisheries. 
DE 
Peter Weingarten, Stefan 
Neumeier 
10 
Federal Institute for Less-Favoured and Mountainous 
Areas 
AT 
Thomas Dax 
11 Dortmund University of Technology 
DE 
Johannes Lueckenkoetter 
12 
Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization, Polish 
Academy of Sciences 
PL 
Jerzy Banski 
13 Institute of Economics Hungarian Academy of Sciences HU 
Gusztav Nemes 
14 Higher Institut of Agronomy 
PT 
Manuel Bello Moreira 
15 Scottish Agricultural  College 
UK 
Marsailli MacLeod 
16 
IOM International Organization for Migration/Central 
European Forum for Migration and Population Research 
PL 
Marek Kupiszewski 
Foreword 
The EDORA project belongs to the first strand of the ESPON 2013 programme: “Applied 
research on territorial development, competitiveness and cohesion: Evidence on European 
territorial trends, perspectives and policy impacts”.  
EDORA has studied the changes which are taking place in rural areas of Europe, and their 
increasing diversity, in order to develop a clear and consistent rationale for policy to enhance 
territorial cohesion. It has attempted to do this from “first principles” beginning with a review of 
theoretical interpretations of rural change, and an analysis of regional patterns and local 
processes. 
It concludes that such a “rural cohesion policy” is confronted with challenges, opportunities and 
potentials at two levels: 
o Some features vary systematically across the ESPON space. These may be captured by 
regional indicators and typologies. A notable example is structural change in the rural 
economy, (as revealed by the EDORA Structural and Performance typologies). It is 
proposed that this “spatially organised” disparity should be addressed through carefully 
targeted horizontal policies to stimulate entrepreneurship and economic diversification. This 
is the macro-regional level.  
o On the other hand EDORA findings suggest that the “drivers” of most aspects of rural 
change are essentially ubiquitous, and that increasing spatial differentiation is principally a 
consequence of micro-scale (localised) differences in the capacity to respond. This 
variation is a function of each region’s unique constellation of assets, both “hard” and “soft” 
(intangible). At this micro-geographical level the key challenge for rural cohesion policy, in 
all but the least developed parts of the EU, relates to intangible assets, such as human and 
social capital, institutional capacity, entrepreneurial culture, and networking of various kinds. 
Tailoring the (micro-level) policy response to each region’s potential points to a “neo-
endogenous” approach, where local knowledge and commitment is supported by advice and 
regulation from the EU and National levels. Advocacy of such an approach highlights the 
pressing need for more appropriate indicators, and regional auditing procedures, to facilitate 
assessment of intangible assets. 
CONTENTS (Parts A and B) 
A: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................... i
B: REPORT .................................................................................................................................. 1
1
Introduction .................................................................................................................... 1
C
ONCEPTUAL 
F
RAMEWORK
............................................................................................................ 2
2
Contemporary Rural Change in Europe: Key Elements and Meta-
Narratives....................................................................................................................... 2
2.1
Introduction: The EDORA Conceptual Framework. .................................................. 2
2.2
Aspects of Rural Change: A Thematic Overview. ..................................................... 3
2.3
“Seeing the wood for the trees”: Structured Coherence in the Process of 
Rural Change .......................................................................................................... 11
E
MPIRICAL 
E
VIDENCE 
B
ASE
.......................................................................................................... 14
3
Macro-scale Patterns of Rural Differentiation. ............................................................. 14
3.1
Background: The Role and Importance of Geographical 
Generalisations. ...................................................................................................... 15
3.2
An Analysis Framework Rather than a Single Typology ......................................... 15
3.3
Country Profiles. ...................................................................................................... 23
4
Micro-scale Processes at a Regional/Local Level. ...................................................... 26
4.1
The Sample of Regions in relation to the Typologies .............................................. 26
4.2
Connexity and the Meta-Narratives ......................................................................... 28
4.3
Other Recurrent themes .......................................................................................... 30
4.4
Micro-Level Differentiation: - The Roles of Meta-Narratives and Local 
Territorial Capital. .................................................................................................... 32
5
The Future for Rural Areas of Europe. ......................................................................... 35
5.1
The Foresight Framework ....................................................................................... 35
5.2
Implications for Rural Regions ................................................................................ 38
POLICY OPTIONS ..................................................................................................................... 39
6
Territorial Cooperation, and its Potential to Strengthen Cohesion. .............................. 39
6.1
A Popular but Ambiguous Concept. ........................................................................ 39
6.2
The Importance of “Intangible Assets”. ................................................................... 41
6.3
Towards an Operational Concept for Rural-Urban Cooperation ............................. 42
6.4
Policy Guidelines and Recommendations: .............................................................. 42
7
Implications for Policy to Promote Competiveness and Cohesion in Rural 
Europe. ........................................................................................................................ 43
7.1
Three Underlying Principles .................................................................................... 43
7.2
The Implications of the Meta-Narratives of Rural Change. ..................................... 45
7.3
Taking Account of Macro-Scale Patterns: The Typologies. .................................... 46
7.4
Assessing Potentials at the Micro Level .................................................................. 47
7.5
A Multi-Level Approach to Support Rural Territorial Cohesion. .............................. 48
8
Suggestions for Further Research. .............................................................................. 49
9
Conclusions. ................................................................................................................ 50
References: ................................................................................................................................ 51
Appendix 1: Maps of Key Indicators used in the EDORA Typologies. ....................................... 55
Appendix 2: Additional Graphs ................................................................................................... 60
Appendix 3: Exemplar Region Summaries ................................................................................. 65
Appendix 4: Additional Tables and Explanations relating to Cohesion Implications 
and Policy Options. ...................................................................................................... 70
Appendix 5: Extract from Copus et al (2010) relating to Specific Opportunities for 
Rural Cohesion Policy from within the Fifth Cohesion Report and “CAP 
towards 2020”. ............................................................................................................. 74
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested