vii
The three resulting maps are shown (as “snapshots”) in Map E1. They are reproduced in full 
size in the main text of the Draft Final Report (Part B). 
An analysis of the typology maps, together with cross-tabulation analysis, provided a useful 
“triangulation” of European rural regions. The principal findings were:  
o Regions in which the primary sector plays a major role in the local economy are mainly 
concentrated in an arc stretching around the eastern and southern edges of the EU27. 
o The rest of the European space is characterised by a patchwork of three types of rural area, 
Consumption Countryside, Diversified (Secondary) and Diversified (Private Services). Of 
these the last seems to be to some extent associated with the most accessible areas. 
o Broadly speaking there is a tendency for the Agrarian regions to be relatively low 
performers, showing many of the characteristics of the process of socio-economic 
“Depletion”. The Diversified (Secondary) regions also tend to be relatively poor performers, 
perhaps because they are dependent upon declining manufacturing industries. 
o The Consumption Countryside regions and the Diversified (Private Services) group are both 
high performers, and likely to continue to “accumulate” in the immediate future. 
These are very simple, broad-brush generalisations, at a macro-regional scale, which, of 
course, cannot “do justice” to the wealth of local (micro-scale) variation in rural areas across the 
ESPON space, or to the infinite number of possible combinations of drivers, opportunities and 
constraints. The latter have been explored through case studies in twelve “Exemplar Regions”, 
reflecting a wide range of different rural situations.  
5. Future Perspectives 
The EDORA Future Perspectives exercise adopts a simplified, qualitative, “foresight” approach, 
comprising a systematic procedure for scenario development, followed by an expert 
assessment of the likely implications for the four Structural types of non-urban regions. 
Scenario construction builds upon earlier phases of the project; viewing the meta-narratives as 
predominantly incremental processes, into which, during the next decades new, “shocks” will 
impose themselves, causing more rapid and radical change. Of the range of potential “shocks” 
which may reasonably be anticipated, the most likely and the most influential in a rural context 
is climate change. The most important aspect of climate change, about which there is not yet 
consensus, is the rapidity with which its impacts (and socio-economic responses) will be 
manifested. A second shock is the recent Credit Crunch and ongoing Sovereign Debt Crisis. 
This seems likely to influence the nature of the economic governance approach underlying the 
policy measures which are developed to meet the challenges of climate change.  
The two “external” variables introduced above structure the analysis in the form of two axes 
which define four quadrants forming the basis of narrative scenarios of change over the coming 
two decades. The first axis stretches between gradual climate change (and responses) at one 
extreme, to rapid change at the other. The second (economic governance) axis ranges from 
“neo-liberal” to “strongly regulated”. Clearly the two axes are not entirely independent of each 
other, laissez faire approaches are more likely if change is gradual, whilst severe and rapid 
climate change is likely to spur MS and international agencies into more “top-down” responses. 
Batch pdf to jpg converter online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf into jpg; convert multi page pdf to jpg
Batch pdf to jpg converter online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
bulk pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter
viii
Scenario 1: Gradual climate change + Deregulated Market Economy 
In many ways this is close to a “business as usual” scenario. With the exception of a shift of 
agriculture towards the para-productivist model, and a substantial growth in new forms of 
energy production, the current processes of change would continue. This would probably be 
associated with a continued increase in regional differentiation. 
Scenario 2: Gradual climate change + Highly Regulated Economy 
In the second scenario the impact of the credit crunch leads to a more cautious and regulated 
form of economic governance in which a shortage of capital inhibits both the private and public 
sector responses to the gradually emerging climate change effects. Limited mitigation means 
that even gradual climate change has significant impacts upon economic activity and quality of 
life in rural Europe, resulting in intensified out-migration from agrarian and sparsely populated 
regions. Energy costs rise but the development of renewables is modest, leading to an 
increasing dependence on nuclear power. Increasing freight costs provide a degree of import 
protection, and slow the decline of manufacturing in Europe. Reduced consumer spending and 
shortage of capital inhibits the expansion of the tertiary sector. 
Scenario 3: Rapid Climate Change + Deregulated Market Economy 
Rapid and disruptive climate change attaches a premium to land as a basic resource 
underpinning both adaptation and mitigation measures. Food prices rise, renewable energy 
production and bio-technology industries expand rapidly. Agricultural production intensifies and 
increasingly adopts bio-technology. There is a concentration of control of the (rural) means of 
production in corporate hands. The tertiary sector is buoyed up by an expansion of financial 
services, and private investments in research and development, although the benefits are 
largely restricted to accessible rural areas. 
Scenario 4: Rapid Climate Change + Highly Regulated Economy 
The rapid onset of climate change results in a coordinated consensus-based public policy 
response. There is rapid public investment in new forms of nuclear power and careful regulation 
of the use of rural land, to ensure food supplies. There are strong and selective migration flows 
from South, East and Central Europe into the North and West, and towards major cities. Public 
transport systems, using low/zero emissions technologies lead to compact urban growth. Fossil 
fuel use is reserved for food production, whilst cropping is also regulated to reduce the 
production of GHGs. The primary and secondary sectors are reinvigorated by the public policy 
response focused upon sustainability. The shift in favour of the tertiary sector slows or is 
reversed. 
An expert assessment of the implications of the above scenarios for the four Structural types of 
rural region established that S1 (Gradual climate change + Deregulated Market Economy) is the 
most likely scenario to emerge. There was some degree of consensus that S2 (Gradual climate 
change + Highly Regulated Economy) would result in the greatest benefits to rural regions. 
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
convert pdf to jpeg; convert pdf to jpeg on
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Features and Benefits. High speed JPEG to GIF Converter, faster than other JPG Converters; file name when you convert the files in batch; Storing conversion
convert pdf file to jpg; change pdf file to jpg online
ix
6. Options for Policy to Promote Competitiveness and Cohesion in Rural Europe. 
The final phase of the project draws some conclusions about policy options. These are 
principally derived as logical extensions of the conceptual and empirical analysis. Nevertheless 
it is important to keep sight of the existing framework for Cohesion Policy, and its broad 
objectives, which derive originally from the Lisbon Agenda (economic competitiveness), the 
Gothenburg Agenda (environment), and the inclusion of Territorial Cohesion in the Treaty of 
Lisbon (art. 158). More recently the EU2020 document (EC 2010a) has come to the fore as the 
context for Cohesion Policy, calling for “smart, sustainable and inclusive growth”. This 
represents the culmination of a process begun under the ESDP, continued through the 
“Territorial Agenda” (COPTA 2007) and more fully explored in the Territorial Cohesion Green 
Paper (EC 2008). In essence it involves pursuing balanced regional development through 
enabling all regions to develop to their full potential. In this sense it is facilitated by “turning 
diversity into strength”. 
The conclusions drawn from the conceptual and empirical findings of EDORA suggest that 
“rural cohesion policy” should operate at two geographic levels; (i) the macro-level
3
, reflecting 
persistent systematic variation, as revealed, for example, by the EDORA Structural and 
Performance typologies, and (ii) the micro-level
4
, addressing aspatial variations in territorial 
assets which constrain localities’ responses to exogenous drivers of change. 
Taking these in turn, we may summarise the main conclusions as follows: 
(i) Macro-level: 
(a) Predominantly Rural Remote, Agrarian, and Consumption Countryside regions are likely to 
present the strongest challenges for Rural Territorial Cohesion policy in the years to come. 
(b) Sectoral Rural Development policy may have some scope for territorial cohesion impacts in 
Agrarian regions, (and perhaps Consumption Countryside regions), but is much less likely to 
deliver benefits in Diversified regions. 
(c) Regional typologies could play an important strategic role in the design and implementation 
of carefully targeted horizontal programmes for rural areas; defining objectives, identifying 
appropriate forms of intervention for different kinds of context, and perhaps allocating 
resources. 
(d) The findings of the Structural Typology point to economic diversification of Agrarian regions 
as one of the key objectives for such targeted horizontal programmes. 
(ii) Micro-level: 
(a) Local territorial assets fall into two broad groups. Some are conventional, tangible 
resources; land, physical resources, access to markets, built capital, transport infrastructure 
3
i.e. groups of regions spanning several Member States 
4
i.e at a NUTS 3 level or smaller (more homogenous) sub regions. 
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Open JPEG to DICOM Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "DICOM" in
convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi; convert pdf to gif or jpg
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Open JPEG to JBIG2 Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JBIG2" in
reader convert pdf to jpg; change pdf file to jpg file
x
and so on. Others, such as human and social capital, institutional capacity, or 
entrepreneurial culture, are “soft”, (intangible, less amenable to quantification). 
(b) Although some of these are subject to broad, macro-scale patterns of variation, the variation 
of most is “aspatial” and very localised. Intangible assets generally fall into the second 
category. Intangible assets play a particularly important role in facilitating a rural area’s 
response to the challenges and opportunities of the New Rural Economy. 
(c) Regional variations in key intangible assets can best be accommodated through a neo-
endogenous “local development” approach. 
(d) A precondition for the success of such an approach would be the development of better 
indicators (perhaps proxies) of intangible assets, and a systematic local/regional auditing 
procedure which would facilitate “benchmarking” of regions in this respect. 
Territorial Cooperation 
An aspect of local development which has attracted considerable attention in recent years, (and 
hence was highlighted by the specification for EDORA), is territorial cooperation, especially 
between urban and rural areas. This theme is touched upon in a wide variety of contexts and 
there is a diffuse (academic and policy) literature. From the policy side the revised Territorial 
Agenda (Salamin 2011) represents an opportunity to establish guidelines for best practice in 
Territorial Cooperation for the meso (Member State) implementation level. 
In this respect the EDORA findings point to the desirability of setting aside the concept of urban 
areas as the sole drivers and sources growth in regional economies. Rural areas are very much 
capable of endogenous dynamics. Two particular aspects of the current literature provide 
promising points of departure for appropriate policy: The literature on rural business networks 
underlines the importance of “bridging” linkages from rural areas to the wider world as a channel 
for new knowledge, market information and so on, and “bonding” linkages within a locality or 
region which facilitate the dissemination of innovation. By contrast, a review of literature on food 
networks pointed to the benefits of short supply chains and “relocalisation” in terms of retaining 
value, enhancement of social capital, and environmental benefits. It is possible that the 
relocalisation paradigm could be applied more generally to rural activities. 
The investigation of territorial cooperation once again underlined the importance of an 
appropriate array of intangible assets as a fundamental precondition of successful local 
development. However, although there is a substantial body of knowledge about them, it needs 
to be applied specifically to the issue of rural-urban cooperation before such “soft factors” can 
gain effective leverage within territorial cohesion policy. 
7. Looking ahead 
In terms of future research which would extend the “toolbox” of spatial planning, a focus upon 
local (micro-level) collaborative planning processes to support the kind of Local Development 
policies recommended by EDORA would be extremely valuable. Components of such a project 
might include further work on: 
o The development of meaningful and comparable indicators, and systematic auditing 
procedures to assess regional territorial assets (both tangible and intangible). 
JPG to JPEG2000 Converter | Convert JPEG to JPEG2000, Convert
Open JPEG to JPEG2000 Converter first; ad JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JPEG2000" in
change pdf into jpg; changing file from pdf to jpg
JPG to Word Converter | Convert JPEG to Word, Convert Word to JPG
Open JPEG to Word Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "Word" in
c# pdf to jpg; pdf to jpeg converter
xi
o An comparative exploration of best practice in stakeholder engagement and collaborative 
dialogue, to facilitate the integration of “bottom up” spatial planning within EU policy.  
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "PNG" in "Output
.pdf to .jpg online; convert pdf into jpg format
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
RasterEdge .NET Imaging PDF Converter makes it non-professional end users to convert PDF and PDF/A documents commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap
batch pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg converter
1
B: REPORT 
1 Introduction 
The starting point of the EDORA project is the recognition that, rather than becoming more 
uniform in character, rural Europe is, in many ways, becoming increasingly diverse. This 
diversity implies both new challenges and changing opportunities. The overarching aim of the 
project is to examine the process of differentiation, in order to better understand how EU and 
Member State policy can enable rural areas to build upon their specific potentials to achieve 
“smart, sustainable and inclusive growth.” As a first step it is very important that we have a clear 
picture of rural Europe and its various development potentials, at the beginning of the 21st 
century. The project emphasises the importance of looking beyond the “agrarian” for that 
potential, since in the majority of European non-urban regions secondary and tertiary activities 
already play a very important role the local economy. Addressing these issues requires a 
research approach which fully reflects recent conceptual advances, and constructs hypotheses 
derived from contemporary interpretations of the process of rural change in the full range of 
European rural environments. At the same time it requires a comprehensive utilisation of 
available data sources, so that robust and empirically valid findings can form a firm foundation 
for policy recommendations.  
Review of the Literature:
- Rural Demography
- Rural Employment
- Rural Business Development
- R-U Relationships
- Cultural Heritage
- Access to Services
- Institutional Capacity
- Farm Structural Change
- Climate Change
Exemplar 
Regions
Cohesion Policy
Implications and 
Potential for
Territorial
Cooperation
Storylines
Database
Proposed
Indicators
Variables
and
Indicators
Future Perspectives
S1
S3
S4
S2
Key Future Drivers
(Exogenous)
Country 
Profiles
EDORA Cube
Storylines
Typologies
Narratives
Empirical Examples
Storylines,
Narratives
Implications
Empirical
Generalisations
Typologies
Agri-
centric
Urban-
Rural
Global-
isation.
Meta-Narratives
Connexity
Conceptual
Empirical
Policy
Scenarios
Figure 1: The Structure of the EDORA Project 
The structure of the EDORA project (Figure 1) was designed to meet these requirements. The 
first phase of the project consisted of a literature review in order to establish a conceptual 
framework for subsequent empirical analysis, and as a basis for a policy rationale. In the 
second phase the evidence base for rural change was explored, both in terms of large scale 
patterns, revealed by regional data, and local processes, based upon a case study approach. In 
addition Future Perspectives for rural Europe were developed and considered. In the third 
phase of the project the conceptual and empirical findings were considered as a basis for an 
appropriate rationale for Cohesion Policy for rural areas. 
Annex 1 is a compilation of the 28 working papers produced by EDORA. This constitutes the 
“Scientific Report” required to accompany the Final Report by the project specification. 
C
ONCEPTUAL 
F
RAMEWORK
2 Contemporary Rural Change in Europe: Key Elements and Meta-
Narratives 
This section summarises the findings of the conceptual phase of the project, including reviews 
of 9 themes of rural change, and their subsequent synthesis 
2.1 Introduction: The EDORA Conceptual Framework. 
As will be evident from the Introduction, the EDORA project has an extremely wide remit; 
covering all aspects of rural change (both in the recent past and immediate future), and the full 
range of (non-urban) regional environments. At the same time the requirement is to go beyond 
description and explanation, with the formulation of recommendations for appropriate policy. 
However, from the outset, it is important to make clear that it is not our intention simply to 
identify a set of economic activities which currently appear to have potential for growth in rural 
areas. Such an approach to “development opportunities” would run a risk of being selective, 
partial and ephemeral. Rather we interpret our task as identifying more enduring and more 
widely applicable generic issues, which can lead to more systemic approaches. This implies a 
need for a conceptual framework which is both inclusive and robust, and which can provide a 
solid and consistent rationale for a variety of forms of intervention.  
2.1.1 
Balancing Specificity and Generalisation. 
The widespread recognition of the increasing diversity of rural areas in Europe, combined with 
the popularity of neo-endogenous development approaches which build upon local specificities, 
means that it is very important that EDORA recognises the fact that all rural areas are in one 
way or another unique. This should not, however, deter us from making generalisations where 
they are useful. 
3
The rural development policy literature is populated by stereotypes, some being more or less 
representative and accurate and others being anachronistic “stylised fallacies” (Hodge, 2004). 
Whilst recent policy design and implementation has attempted to incorporate a degree of 
flexibility to meet local circumstances (menu-based approaches, neo-endogenous approaches 
and so on), generalisations still have a very important role to play in policy design and targeting. 
It is extremely important that such generalisations are accurately representative of 
contemporary rural Europe. 
However it is also important to stress the fact that the generalisations about processes of 
change proposed later in this chapter, and the generalisations about geographical contexts 
presented in Chapter 3, should not be considered as comprehensive. It would be foolish to 
affirm that they are the only possible interpretations of such complex phenomena. Nevertheless 
it is hoped that they are, at least, soundly based upon up-to-date evidence, and that they may 
therefore help to dislodge certain outdated stereotypes, from a position of influence over policy 
design which is increasingly difficult to justify. 
2.1.2 
“Story lines” and “Meta-Narratives” 
A “narrative” approach seems appropriate where the requirement is to organise a large volume 
of information about elements of change which are interlinked in complex ways across both 
rural space and time. Where so much of the information is intrinsically qualitative, narratives are 
more practicable and potentially richer, than quantitative analysis/modelling of indicator data.  
The thematic accounts of recent socio-economic trends provided in working papers 1-9 (Annex 
1) contain what may be termed “story lines” which are focused on specific aspects 
(demography, business development, employment etc). At a more synthetic level these “story 
lines” may be woven into various “meta-narratives” which are not constrained by disciplinary or 
research topic boundaries, but integrate processes across the spectrum.  
It is tempting to view these “meta-narratives” as the “drivers” of rural change. Nevertheless, it is 
important to keep in mind the extreme complexity of the development process, and the partial 
nature of our understanding of it, which means that it is risky (perhaps simplistic) to speak in 
terms of linear cause and effect relationships. It is safer to consider the “meta-narratives” 
primarily as a helpful way of organising an otherwise bewildering array of information. It is also 
worth emphasising that they are not mutually exclusive, the same “story lines” may be tied into 
more than one meta-narrative. Neither are the meta-narratives synonymous with the 
development paths of individual rural areas. Most localities show evidence of several meta-
narratives concurrently. 
2.2 Aspects of Rural Change: A Thematic Overview. 
The research team carried out “state of the art” reviews of scientific literature across nine 
themes. The associated Working Papers are reproduced in Annex 1 (WP1-9). Key findings are 
summarised below under five headings; Economic, Social, Policy and Environmental 
Processes, and Rural-Urban Relationships. Although it is impossible to do justice to the range 
of information or the complexity of the ideas presented in the nine working papers, it is hoped 
that this will provide a more easily digestible overview. 
Within each of these thematic contexts it becomes evident that the Working Paper discussions 
reflect two broad aspects: 
o The first is the “story lines”, socio-economic changes which can be observed across a 
wide range of geographical contexts. 
o The second relates to those contexts, and the way in which they mediate the process of 
change, perhaps facilitating it, or perhaps slowing it down, or choking it off. 
2.2.1 
Economic Processes 
An important “story line” of rural change is concerned with the sectoral structure of economic 
activity. This is commonly measured in terms of employment, and (where regional accounts are 
estimated) gross domestic product (GDP). It is a truism of economic development theory 
(Freshwater 2000 p2) to state that development involves a shift in balance away from primary 
activities, towards secondary (manufacturing) and tertiary (service) activities. In the rural 
development literature this change is often referred to as “diversification”, and the outcome is 
sometimes termed the New Rural Economy (NRE). Although (in comparison to the less 
developed world) Europe could be said to have already completed the transition many decades 
ago, there are many subtle differences between different parts of the ESPON space, and “fine-
tuning” adjustments (between, for example, secondary and tertiary activities, low technology 
and high technology/information intensive activities), continue. 
Where the NRE is most firmly established (generally in the more accessible parts of Europe), 
both primary and secondary activities have been superseded by market service activities as the 
dominant way to earn a living. In this context, of course, the concept of a “rural economy” is 
complicated by a multiplicity of linkages between the countryside and adjacent urban areas, 
including substantial commuting flows. Nevertheless there is plenty of evidence that accessible 
rural areas are very competitive as environments for entrepreneurship, and that counter-
urbanisation (see below) has an employment element as well as a demographic component.  
Another common economic narrative concerns the role and function of the land, landscape and 
natural environment as a basis for economic activity in rural areas. The traditional role of land 
and the farming sector as a producer of food and fibre has been vulnerable to overseas 
competition (where costs are lower) for more than a century. For much of the post-war period 
the pressure for change was resisted through agricultural policies. In the current century trade 
liberalisation has forced the industry to consider product differentiation, (quality, regional 
appellations, organic production, short supply chain arrangements etc) and “niche marketing” as 
strategies to sustain incomes from production. Alongside these solutions are more radical 
approaches based upon attempts to “commodify” public goods which have always been 
associated with the countryside, but which have not hitherto contributed much to rural incomes. 
This is part of the basic rationale for agri-environment policy, and the concept of 
“Multifunctionality”. The latter also encompasses the rise of leisure and tourism activities in 
association with farming. However, a substantial proportion of rural tourism and recreation 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested