mvc export to pdf : Convert .pdf to .jpg online SDK software service wpf winforms .net dnn EDORA_Final_Report_Parts_A_and_B-maps_corrected_06-02-20124-part591

15
important to consider generalisations which describe spatial patterns. In this section we will be 
focusing upon macro-scale patterns, through the construction of typologies of NUTS 3 regions. 
Such large scale, systematic, patterns exist for some aspects of the rural economy and society. 
Other aspects vary across space in more irregular and unpredictably ways, and these cannot be 
incorporated macro-scale regional typologies. These will be considered Section 4 in the context 
of the Exemplar Regions, and in a discussion of micro-level territorial capital, and local 
development policy, in Section 7.  
3.1 Background: The Role and Importance of Geographical Generalisations. 
The EDORA Typology, (or typologies) play a pivotal role in the project, reflecting the findings of 
the early conceptual phase and structuring the subsequent analysis of future perspectives and 
policy implications. In Section 2 we attempted to paint a more accurate picture of contemporary 
rural socio-economic patterns and trends. This reveals an almost infinite variety of local 
situations, produced by a bewildering range of drivers of change, mediated by local 
opportunities and constraints. These drivers combine in various ways, and in order to gain some 
understanding of these, three “meta-narratives” were presented. These are, of course, a form of 
generalisation about common “ensembles” of processes of change. They are not exhaustive or 
inclusive of all the ways in which individual regions experience change. Neither is it possible to 
associate one meta-narrative with one particular type of region. All three, (and probably others 
which we have not described) may be at work, to some extent, in any individual region. The 
meta-narratives can help us explore the processes of change within individual regions (Section 
4). This is necessary and appropriate in the context of the increasing recognition that 
development policy needs to build upon specific local potential, assets and capacities. 
Nevertheless, without shifting from the policy principle of “turning diversity into strength”, it is still 
both possible and helpful to recognise some “macro-scale” and more or less systematic 
geographical patterns across Europe. The EDORA typologies are thus an important element of 
a process of refreshing the (geographical) stereotypes which underlie policy design and 
implementation. This is the focus of the current section. 
The second half of this section illustrates the value and potential of the EDORA typologies by 
presenting key facts (structured according to the typologies) for each of the 27 MS and for 
Norway and Switzerland, and for a limited number of “supra-national” macro regions. Although 
much of the data necessarily predates the current recession, a comprehensive and up-to-date 
overview is extremely valuable as a starting point from which to consider likely Future 
Perspectives, and the foundation principals for appropriate policy.  
3.2 An Analysis Framework Rather than a Single Typology 
Instead of a single typology the EDORA researchers propose an “analysis framework” in the 
form of three typologies reflecting three important dimensions of differentiation among non-
urban regions. These are: 
o Rurality/accessibility. 
o Degree of economic restructuring.  
Convert .pdf to .jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; .net pdf to jpg
Convert .pdf to .jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf page to jpg; convert pdf to jpg file
16 
o Socio-economic performance (accumulation or depletion). 
These three dimensions have been represented diagrammatically as “the EDORA cube”. 
Structural Types (Intermediate and 
Predominantly Rural Areas only):
-------------------------------------------------------
Agrarian
...…………………………………………..
Consumption Countryside
……...……………………………………..
Diversified (Strong Secondary Sector)
…….....…………………………………...
Diversified (Strong Market Services)
D-P Typology:
IA,       IR,      PRA,       PRR
Accumulating
Above Average
Below Average
Depleting
Accumulation
- Depletion
Figure 2: The EDORA Cube – a 3 dimensional framework for analysis 
Note:  
IA = Intermediate Accessible,   
IR = Intermediate Remote
PRA= Predominantly Rural Accessible  PRR = Predominantly Rural Remote 
Unlike most rural typologies (Boehm et al 2009, Bengs et al 2006) the EDORA cube takes us 
beyond the issue of rurality, and into the realms of rural economic structure and performance. 
This is crucial in terms of the usefulness of the framework in supporting policy analysis (Section 
7). However it is important to stress the fact that choice of the three dimensions for which 
typologies were made was substantially constrained by data availability at NUTS 3. Whilst the 
cube represents an advance, no claim is made that the three typologies reflect all socio-
economic characteristics which exhibit systematic macro-scale patterns of differentiation across 
Europe. In an ideal world, with more balance regional databases there would certainly be a 
number of issues to explore. 
3.2.1 
Conceptual Background, Coverage and Methodology. 
The EDORA typologies are implemented at NUTS 3, and (in terms of the OECD classification) 
cover all Intermediate and Predominantly Rural regions. This accommodates the inclusion of 
the Dijkstra-Poelman (D-P) modified OECD typology (Dijkstra and Poelman 2008), as required 
by the technical specification of EDORA. It also reflects the theoretical arguments for not 
separating rural areas from the adjacent small and medium-sized towns with which they interact 
within local and regional economic networks. The EDORA typologies thus cover the areas of 
Europe which broadly equate to Gade’s (1991, 1992) concept of an Intermediate Socio-
Economic Region (ISEZ) and Saraceno’s (1994) “Local Economy”. 
The first typology (the D-P classification according to rurality and accessibility) relates, in broad 
terms, to the Rural-Urban meta-narrative presented in Section 2. It covers the EU27 plus 
Norway and Switzerland (see Map 1). 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert pdf to jpg for online; convert .pdf to .jpg online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
best way to convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg
17
Map 1:The Dijkstra-Poelman Urban-Rural Typology 
The full methodology for the D-P typology is described in Dijkstra and Poelman (2008). The first 
step is to classify all “local units”
6
within each NUTS 3 region as urban or rural, using a criteria 
6
These are either LAU 1 or LAU 2 varying between Member State. 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
convert .pdf to .jpg; best convert pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
change pdf to jpg format; .net convert pdf to jpg
18 
of population density of 150 inhabitants per square kilometre. Predominantly Urban (PU) 
regions are those in which less than 15% live in local units which are rural. Intermediate regions 
are defined as those in which between 15% and 50% live in rural local units. Predominantly 
Rural (PR) regions have more than 50% of their population living in rural local units. Each of 
these three categories are further divided into accessible and remote groups. A region is placed 
in the accessible group “if more than half of its residents can drive to the centre of a city of at 
least 50 000 inhabitants within 45 minutes. Conversely, if less than half its population can reach 
a city within 45 minutes, it is considered remote.” (Ibid p3) 
The Structural typology (Map 2) derives its rationale in part from the second and third meta-
narratives described in Section 2; i.e. those which speak of the transformations affecting the 
agrarian economy and society, and of the increasing impact of global economic forces. It draws 
on the discourse regarding territorial and sectoral policy, and the shift from productivism 
towards new functions highlighting the importance of countryside public goods and the concept 
of “consumption countryside”. In a historical perspective, the long-term evolution of economic 
structures in non-urban areas (away from primary and secondary activities and towards the 
expansion of market services) can be seen as the most recent phase of a long process of 
global/spatial division of labour. The four types of non-urban region which are proposed reflect 
the constraints imposed by the availability of NUTS 3 data. A simple and transparent multi-
criteria approach is used to sequentially define the four groups of regions: 
The first type, the Agrarian regions is defined as those which exceeded the EU27 average for 
three indicators; share of GVA derived from the primary sector, share of employment in the 
primary sector, and agricultural Annual Work Units (AWU) as a percentage of total private 
sector employment. 
The second type, “Consumption Countryside”, is defined as those regions in which at least one 
indicator in two out of three thematic groups exceeded the EU27 average. The three groups of 
indicators relate to capacity for and intensity of tourism activity, access to natural areas, and the 
importance of peri-productivist farming styles
7
The third type, “Diversified (Secondary Sector)” are identified (from the residual after the first 
two were defined) as those in which GVA from secondary sector activities exceeded that from 
private services. 
The final type “Diversified (Market Services)” were the residual after the first three had been 
defined. In other words they do not have a strong dependence upon agriculture, little 
evidence of strong “Consumption Countryside” activities, and a larger share of GVA from 
market services than from the secondary sector. 
7
There is a small degree of overlap between Agrarian and Consumption Countryside definitions (mainly 
in the South of Europe). In these cases the regions are placed in the Agrarian group. 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf images to jpg; convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
convert multiple pdf to jpg online; change file from pdf to jpg on
19
Map 2: The Structural Typology 
The third (Performance) typology (Map 3) derives mainly from the Rural-Urban meta-narrative, 
and places regions on a continuum between “depletion” and “accumulation” of various kinds of 
capital (human, financial, fixed, and so on). The first step in the classification is to create a 
synthetic performance indicator, an unweighted average of normalised “Z” scores of five 
indicators. These are net migration rate, GDP per capita, annual percentage changes in GDP 
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Jpeg, VB.NET compress PDF, VB.NET print PDF, VB.NET merge PDF files, VB.NET view PDF online, VB.NET Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
changing pdf to jpg; convert pdf pictures to jpg
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
batch pdf to jpg converter online; .pdf to jpg converter online
20 
and employment, and unemployment rate. This continuous variable is then presented in four 
categories, defined by the EU27 average, and +/- 0.5 Standard Deviations. 
Map 3: The Performance Typology 
The Structural and Performance typologies cover the EU27, and use a simplified procedure to 
ensure inclusion of NO, CH and TR. For full details of the methodology see WP24 (Copus and 
Noguera (2010) Annex1). Maps of key indicators are provided in Appendix 1. 
21
3.2.2 
The Patterns Revealed 
The geographical distribution of the four Structural types reveals (in very broad-brush terms) a 
degree of association with peripherality. The Agrarian regions occupy an arc “on the edge of 
Europe”, from Finland, south through the Baltic States, Poland, Slovakia, Romania, Bulgaria 
and Greece, and then through S Italy, SW France, and into the southern and western half of the 
Iberian peninsular. The Consumption Countryside regions occupy most of the Nordic Member 
States, much of Germany, Slovenia, Austria, parts of Italy, S France, coastal Spanish and 
Portuguese regions, and the more rural parts of the UK and Ireland. The Diversified regions 
tend to be more accessible. Those in which Secondary activities are dominant are found in the 
Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovenia, around Madrid and in the north of Spain, in parts of 
Germany and the English Midlands. Diversified (market Services) regions are rather 
conspicuous in northern and central France, but are also scattered across N Germany, N Italy, 
parts of the UK, and close to national capitals in the New Member States. The geographical 
pattern of performance scores shows a very clear concentration of Depleting regions in the 
eastern New Member States, the New German Lander and Turkey. Below average scores are 
also found in southern Italy, Greece, western Spain, Portugal, central and NE France, and the 
northern parts of the Nordic Member States and UK. The highest rates of “accumulation” are 
found along the Mediterranean coast of Spain, and north of Madrid, in Ireland (clearly unlikely to 
stand once more recent data is available), southern England and northern Netherlands. Above 
average performance is widespread among the French and German regions, Austria, N Italy, 
and adjacent New Member States, such as the Czech Republic and Slovenia. 
The ability of the D-P and Structural types to differentiate between groups of non-urban regions, 
in terms of their socio-economic performance, was explored through a series of t-tests to 
assess whether the means and variances of the performance indicators associated with the 
various D-P and Structural types were consistent with the probability that the types were 
sampled from different populations
8
. In general terms the results show that the structural 
typology enhances our ability to distinguish between non-urban regions in terms of their socio-
economic performance. 
3.2.3 
Using the “EDORA Cube” to “triangulate” Rural Europe. 
Cross-tabulation of the three typologies suggests some relationships between rurality, structure 
and performance. The following are some of the more interesting findings: 
o 60% of population of Intermediate accessible regions lived in Above Average performing 
or Accumulating regions 
o All other D-P types had a majority of population living in Below Average or Depleting 
regions 
o More than 50% of Agrarian region population lived in Depleting Regions, only 12% in 
Positive Performance categories. 
8
For further details see WP 24 (Copus and Noguera 2010 Annex 1)  
22 
o More than two-thirds of Consumption Countryside population lives in Positive Performing 
regions. 
o The same is true of the Diversified (market services) regions. 
o However only 55% of Diversified (Secondary) population lives in Positive Performing 
regions.  
The analysis presented here is by no means exhaustive, and simply introduces some broad 
generalisations, some of which will be discussed in further detail in the Country Profiles section 
below, and in Section 4.4 (Future Perspectives).  
3.2.4 
Some Initial Conclusions Derived from the Typologies: 
The typologies presented in this report are not intended to be “general purpose”; they have 
been created with two overall objectives in mind: 
o To develop broad generalisations (at the macro level) about rural Europe which might 
helpfully supersede the “stylised fallacies” which have in the past, influenced the design and 
implementation of European policies for non-urban areas.  
o To provide a simple but appropriate framework for analysis for the Future Perspectives and 
Policy Implications tasks. 
With respect to the first of these, it has been shown that: 
(a) Regions in which the primary sector plays a major role in the local economy are mainly 
concentrated in an arc stretching around the eastern and southern edges of the EU27.  
(b) The rest of the European space is characterised by a patchwork of three types of rural area, 
Consumption Countryside, Diversified (Secondary) and Diversified (Private Services). Of 
these the last seems to be to some extent associated with the most accessible areas.  
(c) Broadly speaking there is a tendency for the Agrarian regions to be relatively low 
performers, showing many of the characteristics of the process of socio-economic 
“Depletion”. The Diversified (Secondary) regions also tend to be relatively poor performers, 
perhaps because they are dependent upon declining manufacturing industries.  
(d) The Consumption Countryside regions and the Diversified (Private Services) group are both 
high performers, and likely to continue to “accumulate” in the immediate future. 
These are very simple, broad-brush generalisations, which, of course, cannot “do justice” to the 
wealth of local variation in rural areas across the ESPON space, or to the infinite number of 
possible combinations of drivers, opportunities and constraints. Nevertheless within the context 
of the debate about the future of European (cohesion) policy for rural areas, it would seem that 
the four Structural Types may be more useful categories than the prevalent, but outdated 
association of rural exclusively with Agrarian rural economies, or even with the Consumption 
Countryside. The rather different needs and potentials associated with Diversified rural 
economies (whether strong in secondary activities or private services) would seem to deserve 
far more attention in the context of the policy debate than they have heretofore received. More 
specific implications are reserved for Section 7, where the D-P and Structural typologies are 
fully incorporated into the discussion of policy options. 
23
3.3 Country Profiles. 
The goal of the Country Profiles is to produce “pen-pictures” of rural areas, at national and 
supra-national (groups of countries) levels, based on the three typologies, together with other 
socio-economic indicators, and enriched with the (qualitative) “local knowledge” of partners. 
This is important, since national and regional boundaries are important “filters”, or structuring 
elements, through which the policy community may more easily relate to the new picture of rural 
Europe presented by the EDORA cube. 
This work is reported in WP25 (Noguera and Morcillo 2010, Annex 1), and in a set of 31
9
individual country reports (Annex 2). The following brief summary will present a few key 
findings. It will be very difficult to convey a sense of the size and richness of this resource within 
the few pages available here, and interested readers are encouraged to consult the above-
mentioned documents, for further details and methodological information. 
3.3.1 
Some Broad Patterns of Rural Differentiation 
Within the confines of this brief summary it is hoped to convey an impression of WP25 by 
presenting a small selection of broad comparative “pictures”, first at country level, and then 
combining countries into a selection of “macro regions”. For more specific and detailed 
information readers are encouraged to consult WP 25. 
(a) Country-level Comparisons 
The graph below (Figure 3) provides a clear picture of differentiation between MS in terms of 
their non-urban regions profile, as reflected by the distribution of GDP
10
between the classes of 
the three typologies of the EDORA cube. It is very easy to see, for example, the differences 
between MS in terms of the degree of rurality (graph a). Contrast, for example, the role of non-
urban regions in the Czech Republic or Romania, with that of Belgium or the Netherlands
11
In graphs (b) and (c) the PU regions are excluded (represented by the gaps above the top of the 
columns). Here again the differences between individual MS are very easy to see. For example, 
the importance of Agrarian regions is evident in Romania, Bulgaria, Greece, Poland, Hungary, 
Lithuania and Latvia. The importance of Consumption Countryside regions in the MS of 
Northern Europe is clear. Manufacturing is important in the non-urban regions of Czech 
Republic, Slovakia and Austria, whilst France is the prime example of a MS in which Market 
Services play an important role in rural areas. Their importance in Lithuania is more difficult to 
explain. 
9
EU27 + NO, CH, IS and LI.
10
See Appendix 3 for parallel graphs showing distribution of regions, area and population. 
11
MT, CY and LU are not good example, since they are comprised of a single NUTS 3 region.
24 
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
AT BE
BG
CY CZ Z DE
DK
EE ES
FI FR R GR R HU
IE
IT
LT
LU
LV MT NL L PL PT RO
SE
SI SK K UK
D(PServe)
D(Sec)
CC
Ag
(b) Economic Structure
% GDP
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
AT BE
BG
CY CZ Z DE
DK
EE ES
FI FR R GR R HU
IE
IT
LT
LU
LV MT NL L PL PT RO
SE
SI SK K UK
PU
IA
IR
PRA
PRR
(a) Rurality/Accessibility (Dijkstra-Poelman)
% GDP
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
BE
BE
BG
CY CZ DE
DK EE
ES
FI FR R GR HU
IE
IT
LT
LU
LV MT T NL L PL
PT RO O SE
SI SK K UK
Accum.
Above
Below
Deplet.
(c) Performance (Depleting-Accumulating)
% GDP
Figure 3: Distribution of Regional GDP (PPS) by Typology Class and MS (EU27 only
12
12
NO, CH and TR excluded, due to GDP data constraints. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested