25
(b) Comparisons between European “Meta-Regions” 
In order to further illustrate the importance of macro-scale 
geographic patterns WP25 also presents average results 
for several groups of EU MS. Figure 4 shows the 
distribution of GDP by the categories of the three 
typologies and according to several commonly accepted 
groupings of countries, (EU15, NMS12, Mediterranean 
MS, Central-West Europe (CWE), and the Nordic 
countries)
13
Of these “meta-regions” The NMS12 derives the greatest 
proportion of its GDP (70%) from non-urban regions. The 
Nordic countries are close behind, at 67%. Both the CWE 
and the Mediterranean countries derive a minority (about 
40%) from non-urban areas. Across all the groups of 
countries the Intermediate Accessible type accounts for 
the largest share of non-urban GDP. In the NMS12 and 
the Nordic countries accessible Predominantly Rural 
regions account for a significant share, whilst the remote 
PR type is only of significance in the Nordic group
14
The second (economic structure) graph illustrates very 
clearly the importance of Consumption Countryside 
regions in the Nordic countries, the Agrarian type in the 
NMS12, and the Diversified (Market Services) type in the 
CWE countries. The Diversified (Secondary) type is 
shown to be of greatest importance in the NMS12. 
Figure 4: Distribution of Regional GDP (PPS) by 
Typology Class and Macro Region 
The third (performance) graph shows that the majority of NMS12 non-urban GDP is generated 
by regions exhibiting below average performance or “depletion”. All the other groups of 
countries show a more positive picture, with the Mediterranean group in the lead in this respect. 
Some words of caution are apposite at this point: Although the above graphs are “winsome” in 
their clarity, it is important to keep in mind the fact that the use of NUTS 3 region data means 
that they incorporate multiple sources of distortion, derived from the internal heterogeneity of 
many NUTS 3 regions, differences in the way in which regional boundaries are drawn in 
different MS, and many aspects of the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP).  
13
For definitions of these groups see WP25. 
14
The PRR Group are for obvious reasons more prominent in graphs of share of regions and area (see 
Appendix 2) 
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
EU27
EU15
NMS12
MED
CWE
Nordic
D(PServe)
D(Sec)
CC
Ag
(b) Economic Structure
% GDP
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
EU27
EU15
NMS12
MED
CWE
Nordic
Accum.
Above
Below
Deplet.
(c) Performance (Depleting-Accumulating)
% GDP
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
EU27
EU15
NMS12
MED
CWE
Nordic
PU
IA
IR
PR
A
PR
(a) Rurality/Accessibility (Dijkstra-Poelman)
% GDP
Pdf to jpeg converter - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
to jpeg; change from pdf to jpg on
Pdf to jpeg converter - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg c#; convert pdf to jpg file
26 
4 Micro-scale Processes at a Regional/Local Level. 
This section focuses upon micro-scale processes and differentiation at a local or regional level. 
It begins by reporting the findings of the “holistic” case study analyses which were carried out in 
the 12 Exemplar Regions. This is followed by a summary of recent conceptual work on the 
nature of local “territorial capital”. 
The main purpose of the Exemplar Region analyses of was to deepen our understanding of the 
processes of rural change in different contexts. Six EDORA partners were tasked with preparing 
two exemplar region reports each. This provided 12 Exemplar Region reports, two per country, 
for the UK (North Yorkshire; Skye), Spain (La Rioja; Teruel), Germany (Mansfeld-Sudharz; 
Neumarkt), Slovenia (Osrednjeslovenska; Zasavska) and Poland (Chelmsko-Zamojski; 
Ostrolecko-Siedlecki), one for Sweden (Jonkoping), and one for Finland (South Savo). 
The Exemplar Region reports are reproduced in full as WP11-22 (Annex 1), whilst Appendix 3 
contains summary paragraphs for each region. These highlight both differences between the 
processes of change in each region, and also identify some common patterns across the 
groups of regions. 
Map 4: The Exemplar Regions 
4.1 The Sample of Regions in relation to the Typologies 
At least one of the 12 regions reflected each of the structural types in the EDORA typology and 
each of the Accumulating – Depleting types. All Dijkstra-Poelman types were covered except 
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf image to jpg online; conversion of pdf to jpg
C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
You may use our converter SDK to easily convert PDF, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff, and Dicom files to raster images like Jpeg, Png, Bmp and Gif.
changing pdf to jpg file; convert .pdf to .jpg
27
one: there was no example of an intermediate remote region, but these are unusual within 
Europe. In most cases, comparisons between regions within a single type emphasised 
differences, but there were ways in which groupings of exemplar region reports provided rich 
commentaries on the typology. 
In two cases (ER5, Mansfeld-Sudharz, and ER10, Chelmsko-Zamojski –) their performance 
type, as depleting regions, is the key to understanding the region. Their structural type 
(diversified (strong market services) in both cases) is in the context of depletion and the 
challenge of restructuring. In Osrednjeslovenska region (ER7) the Dijkstra-Poelman 
categorisation as ’close to city’ dominates the narrative of change. Here the development of the 
capital city, Ljubljana, accounts for much of the rapid development of the region, and for its 
categorisation as ’accumulating’ in the typology. 
IA
IR
PRA
PRR
Agrarian
9, 10
Consump. 
Countryside
7
12
2
Diversified 
(Secondary)
48
3
Diversified (Mkt. 
Services)
15
6
11
Note: Performance types 1-2 (accumulating and above average) = Blue, 
types 3-4 (below average and depleting) = Red. 
Figure 5: Distribution of ER Regions by Typology Categories 
The example of Osrednjeslovenska region illustrates the way in which the exemplar region 
reports elaborate on the ‘close to city’ categorisation. Here development of the capital city within 
the region benefits a wider hinterland of Osrednjeslovenska. In other cases, cities outside the 
region are influential in the development of the rural region, such as in North Yorkshire (ER1), 
Neumarkt (ER6) and Jonkoping (ER12). All three have positive development trajectories and 
commuting and local tourism feature strongly in their narratives. Farmers and farming practices 
are reframed as stewards of the countryside and as public goods. Counter-urbanisation is 
another feature of being accessible for North Yorkshire and Neumarkt (the two intermediate 
regions of these three). However, being close to a city is not always advantageous: both 
Mansfeld-Sudharz region and Chelmsko-Zamoski region (ER5 and ER10) are identified as 
‘close to city’ but the reports suggest that this accessibility has little influence on the 
development of the rural regions.  
Most of the exemplar region reports described more than one development trajectory occurring 
within their region. For example, the Neumarkt report (ER6) explained that the north of the 
region is more densely populated and is based around the production of construction materials 
while the south is more sparsely populated and has an attractive landscape, and the La Rioja 
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Jpeg, Png, Bmp, Gif Image to PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.Converter ›› C# Converter: Raster Image to PDF.
change file from pdf to jpg on; convert pdf pictures to jpg
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert pdf into jpg format; convert pdf document to jpg
28 
report (ER4) described the accessible lowland and densely populated area in the north and the 
mountainous area in the south with a sparse and depleting population.  
In some cases the authors were concerned to draw the readers’ attention to how the overall 
categorisation of the region through the typology did not reflect major differences between 
areas. This was particularly the case where the categorisation showed the region to be 
accessible and on a positive trajectory. The North Yorkshire (ER1) report and the Jonkoping 
report (ER12) both stressed that there are people living in less accessible parts of their 
‘accessible’ and positively performing regions who are comparatively deprived. The 
Osrednjeslovenska report (ER7) author also wanted readers to understand that although the 
development of the capital city within the region has produced many benefits for its immediate 
rural hinterland, this is in stark contrast to the development in remoter parts of the region.  
4.2 Connexity and the Meta-Narratives 
The Rural-Urban narrative has already been mentioned above; the exemplar region reports also 
provide interesting accounts of the Agri-centric narrative, the Globalisation narrative, and of the 
overarching theme of connexity, which are discussed in this section. 
The Overarching theme of Connexity 
The connexity of the exemplar regions has already been discussed in terms of the 
(geographical) proximity of cities, and in their wider relationships with ‘global’ capital and 
capitalist systems. The globalisation narrative was referred to in terms of relationships of trade, 
but also in changing relationships with the systems of capitalism (for post-socialist countries). 
The exemplar region reports also emphasised the importance of other relationships and 
interconnections at many scales and in a variety of ways. Many reported the continuing role of 
physical infrastructure in development. For example, the importance of the new road to Teruel 
(ER3), the ‘perfect connections’ to national and international markets for Jonkoping (ER12), how 
new motorways are changing the accessibility of Mansfeld-Sudharz (ER5) and how a new 
canal, built in 1992, connects Neumarkt (ER6) to national and international freight centres. 
The Chelmsko-Zamojski (ER10) report describes a different sort of local business connectivity 
example: how farms were amalgamating. The Mansfeld-Sudharz case study (ER5) talks about 
linking the tourism sites that are under development in the region. In Jonkoping (ER12), 
effective interaction between political institutions, the public sector, research and industry is 
leading to a creative environment for businesses and communities.  
For some regions their connectedness is complicated by border issues. The situation is most 
acute in Chelmsko-Zamojski (ER10) which has a border with the Ukraine. Joining the EU 
Schengen area has made Poland’s border with the Ukraine less porous, and the potential for 
the rural region to develop trade and cross-border services has been reduced. The former 
border between east and west Germany still means that Mansfeld-Sudharz (ER5) has weak 
relationships across its west-facing border. In South Savo (ER11) the old municipality borders 
within the new region cause a lack of cooperation on rural developments. 
XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
This .NET file converter SDK supports various commonly used document Office (2003 and 2007) Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff, Dicom, SVG, Jpeg, Png, Bmp
changing pdf to jpg on; changing file from pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
As this VB.NET PDF converter component plug-in embeds several image image converting applications, like PDF to tiff conversion, PDF to JPEG conversion and
change format from pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg converter
29
The Agri-centric Meta-Narrative 
Some reports emphasise the decreasing importance of agriculture in terms of employment for 
the overall development trajectory of their region (e.g., North Yorkshire (ER1) and 
Osrednjeslovenska (ER7)). In the case of Ostrolecko-Siedlecki (ER9) dairying was intensifying 
and the increase in productive farming was stressed. In La Rioja region (ER4) it was the 
complete supply chain – from grape growing to the bottles of wine – that was important. The 
reframing of farmers and farming as stewards of the ‘public good’ of the countryside in close to 
the city regions was conspicuous in North Yorkshire (ER1), Jonkoping (ER12) and Neumarkt 
(ER6). On the Isle of Skye (ER2), a predominantly rural region, the cultural identity associated 
with the ‘crofting’ smallholdings, the collective ownership of land and the beauty of the 
landscape have been significant resources in developing tourism and attracting incomers.  
The agri-centric narrative’s assumption that agriculture has been an important part of the 
development of all rural areas in Europe is challenged by some ER reports. In the South Savo 
(ER11) region, 25% of the area is lakes, and 85% of the land area is covered by forest. A 
number of regions report that their traditional economy was based on mining and heavy industry 
activity (e.g., Zasavska (ER8) and Mansfeld-Sudharz (ER5)), suggesting that discussion of 
post-industrial or para-industrial developments might be more applicable to them than 
discussions of post-agricultural or para-agricultural developments. 
The Rural-Urban Meta-Narrative 
Towns, rather than cities, are important hubs in some of the regions. In Chelmsko- Zamojski 
(ER10) a network of small, evenly spaced, towns has developed as local centres for services, 
trade and administration. Another example are the 28 market towns in North Yorkshire (ER1) to 
which many people (including city dwellers) commute for work. The Jonkoping report (ER12) 
explained how regional government is aiming to develop a series of service centres within the 
rural region so that people will not have to go out of the region for the services that have 
become centralised into the adjacent cities.  
In terms of the Rural-Urban narrative, commuting to the cities, counter-urbanisation and the 
provision of rural tourism for city dwellers were frequently described in the exemplar region 
reports. The migration of people was an important theme. Some regions had become depleted 
because of out-migration, particularly of young people and women, such as South Savo (ER11) 
and Chelmsko-Zamojski (ER10). In some cases recent in-migration of young people somewhat 
redressed this balance (e.g., Teruel (ER3), but in others, such as on Skye (ER2) and North 
Yorkshire (ER1) while young people tended to move out, it was older people who generally 
moved in. Visitors to many rural regions were often from nearby cities, but some, such as Skye 
(ER2), attracted a much more international clientele.  
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Help to convert PDF to multiple image formats, including GIF, BMP, JPEG, PNG and so on. Remarkably, this PDF document converter control for C#.NET can
convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi; c# convert pdf to jpg
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
NET converter control for It enables you to build a PDF file with one or more images. Various image forms are supported which include Png, Jpeg, Bmp, and Gif
batch convert pdf to jpg online; batch pdf to jpg online
30 
The Globalisation Meta-Narrative 
The globalisation narrative is most explicit in the report on La Rioja (ER4). Here there was a 
long history of significant trading in wine not only with adjacent urban areas, but also with 
France. More recently there have been significant increases in the production and sale of wine 
to new overseas markets, brought about mainly by accession to the EU, international trade 
liberalisation via GATT and the injection of international capital into wine agribusinesses. The 
significance of accession to the EU to the development trajectory of the region is also 
mentioned in a number of other regional reports (Chelmsko-Zamosjski (ER10); Ostrolecko-
Siedlecki (ER9); South Savo (ER11)). 
For a number of regions, the sudden switch to capitalist systems following the collapse of 
socialism was significant in their development trajectories. In Mansfeld-Sudharz (ER5) the 
mining industry on which they were dependent during the socialist era could not withstand 
global competition, and the region experienced rapid depopulation and high unemployment. A 
similar narrative occurred in the Zasavska report (ER8) which stressed not only the post-
industrial decline, but also the legacy of environmentally degraded landscapes. In Ostrolecko-
Siedlecki (ER9), the post-socialist era (and the EU accession of Poland) brought benefits to 
parts of the region, although overall it is still depleting. The restructuring of the dairy industry 
has made Ostrolecko-Siedlecki one of most intensive dairying regions of Poland, and 
contributes to the significant increase in the dairy industry sales in Poland – an increase of 80% 
between 2000 and 2007. In the socialist era, the policy in Slovenia was to develop a polycentric 
structure of urban areas rather than to focus on the development of a capital city; the collapse of 
socialism has seen the dramatic development of Ljubljana as the capital city within the region of 
Osrednjeslovenska (ER7). 
4.3 Other Recurrent themes 
Some themes were replicated in almost all the region reports, irrespective of their rurality,  
structural or performance type. The most significant in this respect were that the rural population 
is an ageing population, and the emphasis placed on the development of tourism. The ageing 
population in rural regions was generally closely associated with the out-migration of young 
people for education and work. Some reports explained how the low numbers of people of 
reproductive age left behind then affected the birth rate. In regions where counter-urbanisation 
or immigration occurred, this sometimes exacerbated rather than ameliorated the ageing nature 
of the population – in North Yorkshire (ER1), for example, retirement to the countryside was 
popular. 
The development of tourism was reported as a popular means of diversifying from traditional 
land-based activities, whether in accessible or remote areas. Much of this was designed for 
domestic, and often relatively local, day or weekend visits (in Neumarkt (ER6) and Teruel (ER3) 
for example). In some cases the attraction was not simply the high environment and landscape 
quality, but the cultural heritage that existed, or could be developed.  
31
Social capital and institutional capacity are topics which do not fit neatly into a single meta-
narrative, but which merit a specific mention here because they were recurrent themes in the 
Exemplar Region reports. The importance of local people acting collectively was emphasised in 
a number of reports, such as the Village Action Movement in Jonkoping (ER12) and how the 
cooperation between three municipalities and their civil societies led to LEADER funding and 
actions in Neumarkt (ER6). There were numerous references to cooperation between 
businesses in the reports, two examples of which are described here. The Jonkoping report 
(ER12) referred to the ‘spirit of Gnosjo’ – the local enterprising and network culture – and the 
Chelmsko-Zamojski case study (ER10) to the new producer groups, farming unions and 
associations that are forming.  
Governance relationships at many scales, from within very local municipalities, to the supra-
national levels of decision-making – the EU, GATT, for example, were shown to be important to 
the development of rural areas. A number of reports stressed the importance of more 
participative governance relationships, such as through the LEADER approach (e.g., Teruel 
(ER3) and South Savo (ER11)). In Mansfeld-Sudharz (ER5), LEADER initiatives were originally 
dominated by the public sector, but the business community and civil society are now becoming 
more involved. However, some region reports stressed the difficult relationships within their 
regions. For example, the Neumarkt report (ER6) gave examples of the conflicts between new 
and old residents, and between those who wish to preserve and those who wish to transform 
the traditional rural culture. 
Some rural regions’ development has been strongly influenced by external decision-making 
bodies. For some the effects of the relationship have been positive, such as on Skye (ER2) 
where the development success is often associated with state intervention. In other cases the 
impact of external decisions on the rural regions are negative, such as with the introduction of 
the Schengen area on Chelmsko-Zamojski (ER10) already discussed. The North Yorkshire 
case study (ER1) and the Jonkoping report (ER12) provide detailed accounts of how the rural 
region’s development is intimately bound up with higher level regional decision-making. In both 
cases the current approach is to integrate rural issues into the ‘mainstream’ policies of city-led 
‘functional regions’. 
The reports described how the regions are changing at different rates. What was apparent from 
the exemplar regions reports was that some regions are building on their past successes to be 
shown currently as ‘accumulating’ regions in the typology. La Rioja (ER4) is a good example of 
this. Others have long histories of depletion, but have recently turned this around to show 
positive performance categories on the typology. Skye (ER2) and Teruel (ER3) are both 
examples of this but both report authors show some scepticism about the robustness of their 
regions’ ‘success stories’. In the Skye report the question was raised of how far Skye’s 
development can be claimed a success when much of the economic activity is low paid, 
seasonal and dependent on multiple job-holding. In Teruel depletion in population terms has 
been reversed by the immigration of young people from Latin America, Africa and Romania, but 
the report authors stressed that these people could be transitory rather than permanent 
migrants. 
32 
The penetration of capitalist systems into the post-socialist states provided significant 
discontinuity from past trajectories. For some post-socialist exemplar regions this brought 
immediate benefits: Osrednjeslovenska (ER7), for example, has flourished as a rural region 
which includes a fast-growing capital city. For others the disruption brought significant depletion 
(e.g., Mansfeld-Sudharz (ER5) and Chelmsko-Zamojski (ER10)). Some reports referred to 
accession to the EU as a significant event in their development trajectory (see for example 
South Savo (ER11)). The notion that major events are often important in setting regions off on 
new trajectories is also well documented in the historic accounts provided by many reports: the 
draconian clearances by landlords in the nineteenth century on Skye (ER2), and the effects of 
disease on French vines for the wine industry in La Rioja (ER4), for example. 
4.4 Micro-Level Differentiation: - The Roles of Meta-Narratives and Local 
Territorial Capital. 
The Exemplar Region reports provide a series of pen pictures of the empirical reality of recent 
development and micro-level patterns in different rural contexts across the EU. They illustrate 
the fact that the meta-narratives, and the patterns revealed by the (macro level) typologies are 
high level abstractions. Thus, although there are recurrent broad themes, the detailed reality in 
an individual rural region is a unique outcome of a singular development path, which is a 
consequence of the interaction between exogenous drivers (associated with the meta-
narratives) and the local assemblage of assets and capacities. 
In the context of rural development the role of some of these local assets, such as transport and 
communication infrastructure, appropriate buildings, access to business services and training 
have long been recognised. More recently there as been increasing awareness of the 
importance of “soft” or “intangible” assets, such and human or social capital. Nevertheless, 
much of the theoretical literature relating to “intangible assets” comes from the fields of regional 
development or entrepreneurship and is (implicitly) urban in its focus. There is a rich and varied 
lexicon, including “externalities”, “untraded interdependencies”, “associational economy”, 
“institutional thickness”, “embeddedness”, “innovation systems”, “milieu”…and so on. 
There have been some attempts to synthesise, and mobilise, these ideas in a rural policy 
context. Two of these, the assets-based approach to development (Braithewaite 2009), and 
Camagni’s (2008) concept of “territorial capital”, were examined in WP26 (Courtney et al 2010, 
Annex 1), in terms of their usefulness for rural cohesion policy, and it will be helpful to introduce 
them here. 
The “assets-based community development” (ABCD) approach was recently summarised by the 
Carnegie Trust under the heading “Community Capitals Framework”. They stress the 
importance of seven forms of capital; built, financial, natural, human, social, cultural and 
institutional (or political). Courtney et al (Ibid) emphasise that the inclusion of the latter is crucial, 
but they add that part of the “political asset base” required for successful neo-endogenous rural 
policy needs to be situated outside the locality, at a regional, national or EU level. 
33
Capital
Definition
Examples and comments.
Financial
Financial capital plays an important role in 
the economy, enabling other types of capital 
to be owned and traded.
The liquid capital accessible to the rural 
population and business community, and that 
held by community organisations.
Built
Fixed assets which facilitate the livelihood or 
well-being of the community.
Buildings, infrastructure and other fixed assets, 
whether publically, community or privately 
owned. 
Natural
Landscape and any stock or flow of energy 
and (renewable or non-renewable) resources 
that produces goods and services, (including 
tourism and recreation).
Water catchments, forests, minerals, fish, wind, 
wildlife and farm stock.
Social
Features of social organisation such as 
networks, norms of trust that facilitate 
cooperation for mutual benefit. May have 
"bonding" or "bridging" functions.
Sectoral organisations, business representative 
associations, social and sports clubs, religious 
groups. 'Strength' relates to intensity of 
interaction, not just numbers.
Human
People's health, knowledge, skills and 
motivation. Enhancing human capital can be 
achieved through health services, education 
and training.
Health levels less variable in an EU context. 
Education levels very much generational. 'Tacit 
knowledge' is as important as formal education 
and training.
Cultural
Shared attitudes and mores, which shape the 
way we view the world and what we value.
Perhaps indicated by festivals, or vitality of 
minority languages. Some aspects  - e.g. 
'entrepreneurial culture' - closely relate to 
human and social capital.
Political
The ability of the community to influence the 
distribution and use of resources.
Presence of, and engagement in, 'bottom up' 
initiatives, the most local part of 'multi-level 
governance'. Relates to local empowerment v. 
top-down policy, globalisation.
Figure 6: The Seven forms of Capital recognised by Asset Based Community 
Development. 
Source: Based on Braithewaite 2009 
Materiality
Rivalry
Club/Impure
Public Goods
Mixed
Hard/
Private
Hard/
Public
Soft/
Public
Soft/
Private
Private
Goods
Public
Goods
"Hard"
"Soft"
Figure 7: Territorial Capital 
Source: Based on Camagni 2008 
The Camagni presentation of territorial capital is extremely helpful because it pulls together, in a 
coherent and systematic framework, a broad spectrum of different kinds of tangible and 
34 
intangible assets, showing how they relate to two dimensions; “materiality” and “rivalry” (for a 
more detailed description see Courtney et al 2010 p5). Examples of rural territorial assets on 
the left (hard) side of the diagram would include farm buildings and machinery, transport 
infrastructure and so on. The former are private goods, and would therefore occupy the top left 
corner, whilst the latter are “non-excludable” and would be in the bottom left corner. On the right 
(soft) side human capital assets would occupy the top right (private) quadrant, whilst social 
capital would be located at the bottom right, being public goods. Agri-environment public goods 
would also be located in the bottom right corner.  
A third approach has recently emerged in the findings of the EU Framework 7 IAREG project 
(Suriñach et al 2010). Once again, this does not specifically take rural conditions into account. 
Nevertheless it has much to offer in terms of drawing together a wide range of different kinds of 
“soft factor”, and especially in terms of considering ways to measure such phenomena in an 
operational way, and reviewing potential regional and national indicators. 
Figure 8 is an attempt to provide a simple summary of the way in which EDORA researchers 
conceive the process of “micro-level differentiation” of rural areas across Europe. The meta-
narratives of rural change are more or less uniform across ESPON space, and act as 
exogenous drivers. Their impact is mediated by each rural area’s unique assemblage of 
territorial capital, with the result that local consequences are highly individual, and micro-level 
patterns exhibit strong differentiation. 
Financial
Human
Social
Cultural
Institutional
Built
Natural
Agri-
centric
Urban-
Rural
Global-
isation.
Meta-Narratives
Connexity
Differentiated rural areas
Figure 8: Schematic Representation of Micro-Scale process of rural differentiation 
The exogenous drivers (meta-narratives) are the consequence of deeply-rooted global socio-
economic trends which may be considered effectively immutable (in terms of policy 
intervention). The main “levers” for policy are therefore in the realm of territorial capital. In the 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested