mvc export to pdf : Batch convert pdf to jpg online Library application class asp.net azure html ajax EDORA_Final_Report_Parts_A_and_B-maps_corrected_06-02-20127-part594

45
peripherality, weak agglomerative advantages, poor communications, negative population 
trends (and associated labour market issues), difficulties in maintaining provision of services of 
general interest, and so on. 
Whilst acknowledging that sectoral rural development policy may have territorial cohesion 
impacts where the primary sector is a relatively important component of the regional/rural 
economy (such as in Agrarian regions, and perhaps some Consumption Countryside regions) it 
is our intention in the final pages of this report, to articulate a rationale for policy to (directly) 
address territorial cohesion in a rural context. This will be firmly based upon the findings of the 
preceding sections, arguing that meta-narratives and the typologies suggest some broad 
priorities for macro-regions, but that it is also crucial to be responsive to regional/local/micro-
scale variations in intangible assets, through local development approaches. 
7.2 The Implications of the Meta-Narratives of Rural Change. 
The review of the literature described in Section 2, and the examination of Exemplar Regions 
(Section 4) drew attention to a wide range of opportunities and constraints for rural areas. In 
Table 1 (below) we have listed a selection of these according to the three meta-narratives 
presented in Section 2.3. The final column of the table suggests policy “domains” which may be 
appropriate to address these opportunities and constraints, at either EU or national level. 
Table 1: Some examples of Rural Opportunities and Constraints associated with the 
three Meta-Narratives. 
Meta 
Narrative 
Opportunities 
Challenges 
Policy 
Domains 
Agri-
Centric 
Increased agricultural 
competitiveness in some areas. 
Diversification. 
Remuneration for rural amenities 
(consumption countryside). 
Quality products, short supply 
chains, regional appellation. 
Loss of agricultural competitiveness in some 
areas  low income or abandonment. 
Decline in farm employment, even in competitive 
areas. 
Environmental effects of intensification in 
competitive areas. 
Difficulty in valuation of public goods. 
Agriculture. 
Rural 
Development. 
Human capital 
(training). 
Land use. 
Rural-
Urban 
Counter-urbanisation (increased 
population and economic activity) 
in intermediate and accessible 
rural areas). 
Information technology 
facilitating new activities. 
Establishment of the New Rural 
Economy. 
Sparsity (especially in remote rural areas) 
Peripherality. 
Selective out-migration from remoter and 
sparsely populated regions. 
Accelerated demographic ageing. 
Difficulties in provision of SGI. 
Pump effects of infrastructure improvements. 
Infrastructure. 
Telecommuni
cations. 
Land use 
planning. 
Transport. 
SGI 
Global-
isation 
Wider markets for rural products. 
Rapid diffusion of innovation. 
Increase in “primary segment” 
jobs. 
Expanded opportunities for 
international tourism. 
Restructuring – loss of competitiveness for 
“traditional” activities. 
“Rationalisation” of globally controlled activities 
 concentration in accessible rural, 
intermediate, or urban regions.  
Loss of local control over economic activities, 
employment, provision of market services etc. 
Loss of regional distinctiveness, cultural assets, 
 reduced residential attractiveness and 
potential for tourism. 
Competition. 
Trade. 
Employment. 
Social 
Inclusion. 
Tourism. 
Batch convert pdf to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file to jpg on; change pdf file to jpg online
Batch convert pdf to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
bulk pdf to jpg converter; conversion pdf to jpg
46 
The first observation based on Table 1 is that (although the examples provided are not intended 
to be comprehensive) the three meta-narratives point to a rather broad spectrum of 
opportunities and challenges, and a similarly wide range of policy domains. 
The second point to be made is that each of the meta-narratives has a number of different 
impacts, both positive and negative, and that these are likely to vary with regional context. Thus, 
for example, the rural-urban meta-narrative points to opportunities in the accessible rural and 
intermediate areas, due to counter-urbanisation, and the advance of the New Rural Economy, 
but to selective out-migration, accelerated demographic ageing etc. in the more remote and 
sparsely populated rural regions. Similarly, Globalisation can bring an increase in “primary 
segment” employment in some areas, but a loss of competitiveness, local control, and 
degradation of cultural assets in others. This points to the necessity of taking account of 
different regional contexts. This can be carried out at various scales, from very localised to 
broad “macro regions”. The next section illustrates how the EDORA typologies can be helpful at 
this more broad-brush level, whilst Section 7.4 considers how this may be approached in the 
context of individual regions, where the key issue is the level of “intangible assets” which 
facilitate the response to opportunities. 
7.3 Taking Account of Macro-Scale Patterns: The Typologies. 
The role of “broad-brush”, “macro-regional” and “structural” patterns (as represented in the 
EDORA typologies) in the rationale for rural cohesion policy is explored in the final section of 
WP24 (Copus and Noguera 2010, Annex 1). The tables and the associated discussion are 
reproduced in Appendix 4. 
The exercise presented in Appendix 4 is not claimed to be comprehensive, further detailed 
analysis of the processes of rural change, and the associated challenges and opportunities, 
differentiating between different types of “non-urban” region (both in terms of degree of rurality 
and economic structure) would of course be helpful. Nevertheless it illustrates the fact that 
some basic generalisations regarding the impact of the meta-narratives on different kinds of 
rural region are possible, and that these could play a role in a first stage of rural territorial 
cohesion policy design.  
Three key findings are: 
(i) 
The focus of this first, “broad-brush” stage should be appropriate objectives, broad 
intervention strategies, and overall/indicative resource allocations for the principal 
types of non-urban region. This points first to a role in strategic targeting within 
Cohesion Policy, and secondly to the potential to influence the “shape” of Member 
State policies through the updated Territorial Agenda. 
(ii) 
That the Agrarian, Consumption Countryside, and Diversified (Secondary) types of 
region seem to exhibit a balance towards challenges rather than opportunities, and 
achieving their full potential is likely to imply a greater level of cohesion policy 
support (Figure 10). 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf to jpeg on; convert pdf page to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
VB.NET components for batch convert high resolution images from PDF. Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap
change from pdf to jpg; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
47
(iii) 
That (as already stated above) sectoral rural development interventions have more 
scope to deliver territorial cohesion benefits in Agrarian regions than elsewhere, 
simply because the primary sector is a larger element of the economy. This does not 
mean, of course that other forms of intervention, addressing (for example) issues of 
infrastructure, human capital, service provision, business development and so on, 
are not required in Agrarian regions. However it is reasonable to conclude the 
converse, that sectoral rural development interventions have very modest territorial 
cohesion impacts in regions in which the primary sector is relatively unimportant. 
Agri-
Centric
Rural-
Urban
Global-
isation
Intermediate 
Accessible
+/-
+
+
Intermediate 
Remote
+/-
+
+
Predom. Rural 
Accessible
+/-
+
+
Predom. Rural  
Remote
-
-
-
Agrarian
-
+/-
-
Consumption 
Countryside
+/- +/- - +/-
Diversified 
(Secondary)
+
+
-
Diversified 
(Market Serv.)
+
+
+
Meta-Narrative
Rural Types
Figure 10: Broad Generalisations about the Relationship between Meta-Narratives and 
Rural Types 
7.4 Assessing Potentials at the Micro Level 
As both the Exemplar Region reports (Section 4) and the review of urban-rural relationships 
(Section 6) illustrated, each individual region has a unique combination of assets and 
capacities, both tangible (landscape, agricultural land, settlement pattern, communications and 
transport networks, workforce, commercial and industrial buildings etc) and intangible (human 
capital, social capital, institutional capacity, entrepreneurial culture etc). Upon these, various 
processes of rural change (summarised in the meta-narratives), and the exogenous shocks of 
the Future Perspectives analysis, act. As we have seen, some aspects of this nexus of regional 
potential and forces of change vary systematically across Europe, are measured by widely 
available indicators, and can therefore be captured (at least in part) by the typologies. By 
contrast, most of the intangible assets, which are the key to “diagnosis” and programme design 
at a more detailed, individual region, level are not currently reflected in published statistics. 
Some are in any case “aspatial”; (i.e. not subject to systematic variation). These observations 
point to two requirements: 
(a) A standardised form of regional auditing of assets (especially intangibles), in order to 
provide an adequate evidence base upon which to base a choice of interventions tailored to 
the assets and potential of each region. 
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
changing pdf to jpg; reader pdf to jpeg
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Powerful .NET control to batch convert PDF documents to tiff format in Visual C# .NET program. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images.
.net convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg image
48 
(b) A determined and sustained effort to redress the balance of the published indicator 
resource, to eliminate the current agrarian bias, and to introduce innovative indicators (or 
reliable proxies) for key intangible assets. 
“As the specific constellation of local and regional assets (both tangible and intangible) vary in 
a more unsystematic way across Europe, these would have to be assessed through local or 
regional audits... The proposed regional audits suggest a process to take full account of 
development assets and explore required and most effective activities for each region. These 
considerations ought to be supported by general guidelines that translate the framework of 
regional typologies and meta-narratives into a set of relevant intervention priorities…” Dax et al 
(op cit p24). 
7.5 A Multi-Level Approach to Support Rural Territorial Cohesion. 
At the beginning of this section the ultimate aim of the project was restated, as finding ways to 
promote territorial cohesion by identifying ways in which “EU and Member State policy can 
enable rural areas to build upon their specific potentials”. Clearly the rationale presented above 
points generally towards a multi-level approach, addressing both macro and micro-scale 
components of rural change and differentiation (Figure 11). 
Neo-Endogenous
Local
Development 
Micro-scale
Patterns of
(Intangible) Assets,
Regional Audits
Individual
Region
Targeted
Horizontal
Programmes 
Macro-scale
(Structural) 
Patterns. 
Regional indicators
and Typologies
Type or
Macro-Region
Figure 11: Multi-Level Rural Cohesion Policy 
At the macro-scale level the EDORA typologies have pointed to economic restructuring and 
diversification as a key issue. There are clear and persistent macro-scale patterns of structural 
differentiation, closely associated with disparities in economic performance which seem well 
suited to carefully targeted horizontal forms of intervention. In terms of existing policies, Axis 3 
of CAP Pillar 2, Cohesion Fund and Convergence Objective policies are the obvious vehicles. 
However the former is currently rather sectoral in terms of its implementation, whilst the latter 
could be seen as urban in focus, and particular consideration should be given to the role and 
needs of rural SMEs, and non-farming rural households. 
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
and Benefits. Powerful image converter to convert images of Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after
change file from pdf to jpg; change pdf file to jpg file
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
speed JPEG to GIF Converter, faster than other JPG Converters; Automatically sort the file name when you convert the files in batch; Storing conversion
convert pdf to jpg for online; change pdf to jpg on
49
At the micro-scale (local/regional) level the key policy “levers” relate to various kinds of 
territorial capital, with an increasing emphasis upon intangible or “soft” aspects, such as human 
and social capital, institutional capacity, and so on). This points to neo-endogenous forms of 
intervention, termed “local development” by the Fifth Cohesion Report (EC 2010c), supported 
by standardised, comparable auditing of local assets. The LEADER Axis of CAP Pillar 2 is 
(despite many criticisms of the handling of “mainstreaming”) perhaps the most promising 
example of this form of intervention. 
However EU policies such as those mentioned above can never be sufficient. A very broad 
range of Member State and regionally implemented policies have an impact upon rural change 
and patterns of differentiation at both macro and micro regional levels. With respect to these the 
most realistic policy objective is to increase awareness and readiness to take account of rural 
impacts within the Member State policy community. The most promising vehicle for this is the 
Territorial Agenda (COPTA 2007). It is desirable that the ongoing revision (Salamin 2011) 
should take it beyond its current focus upon rural-urban linkages as the main response to 
differential performance, towards “rural cohesion proofing” across a wide range of Member 
State policy domains. In this sense it could occupy a “meso” (Member State) level in terms of 
implementation. 
The above description of the sort of policy rationale/architecture which follows logically from the 
findings of EDORA, (both conceptual and empirical) is of course predicated upon the 
assumption of “a clean sheet”, or “starting from scratch”. As such it will appear somewhat 
disconnected from the current debate centred upon the CAP Towards 2020 document (EC 
2010b), and the Fifth Cohesion Report (EC 2010c), and the debate about the programming 
period beginning in 2014. Sadly the two documents mentioned above seem to portend rather 
limited opportunities to implement the conclusions of EDORA in the near future. Two specific 
possibilities, relating to targeting of Single Farm Payments, and Multi-Fund Local Development 
programmes were highlighted by Copus et al (2011) at the Bled Conference. An extract from 
this paper, providing details, is reproduced as Appendix 5. 
8 Suggestions for Further Research. 
A range of possible avenues for further investigation suggest themselves, including very topical 
issues such as further exploration of climate change impacts and possible responses in different 
kinds of rural area, or the effects of recession and the nature of resilience in different contexts. 
However these issues will undoubtedly attract research funding from a variety of sources in the 
coming years.  
However it is important to keep in mind the core mission of ESPON. In terms of future research 
which would extend the “toolbox” of spatial planning, a focus upon local (micro level) 
collaborative planning processes to support the kind of Local Development policies 
recommended above would be extremely valuable. Components of such a project might 
include: 
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
An advanced .NET control able to batch convert PDF documents to image formats in C# Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
.pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg online
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Select "Convert to DICOM"; Select "Start" to start conversion How to Start Batch JPEG Conversion to DICOM. JPEG to DICOM Converter first; Load JPG images from
convert pdf pages to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg file
50 
o Further work to develop meaningful and comparable indicators of “soft” forms of territorial 
capital. This would need to be preceded by systematic comparative analyses of rural 
regions across Europe, in order to better understand the nature and role of the different 
forms of capital. 
o The development of systematic auditing procedures to assess regional territorial assets 
(both tangible and intangible). 
o An comparative exploration of the ways in which “top-down” visions and strategies may be 
replaced by engagement with stakeholders in collaborative dialogue to ‘plan’ through 
deliberative processes. The difficult next step would be to develop procedures which could 
allow such engagement to interact with EU policy. 
In practical terms a targeted analysis, involving a selection of stakeholder regions representing 
different types of rural area, would probably be the most productive environment, since it would 
allow specific approaches to be piloted. The desired outcome would be practical tools to support 
the multi-fund Local Development initiatives anticipated during the next programming period. 
9 Conclusions. 
Rural development research and policy has struggled for decades to break out of a “sectoral 
straightjacket”. Among the challenges is the difficulty of establishing boundaries, once the old 
sectoral line has been crossed. The EDORA review of the “state of the art” paints a very 
complex picture of rural change. The “meta-narrative” approach offers a means of organising 
this material, illustrating inter-relationships between a wide range of “story lines”. The key output 
of the empirical phase of the project, the “EDORA cube”, is a novel attempt to provide a sound 
empirical foundation for the construction of new generalisations which reflect the realities of 
twenty-first century rural Europe. 
An important “sub-text” in the conceptual review is the importance of local context, resources or 
assets, in determining the capacity to respond positively to ubiquitous meta-narratives of 
change, which is the principal determinant of differentiation between regions. In the final 
sections of this report this concept is mobilised in a policy context in the form of neo-
endogenous “asset-based development”. The potential benefit of incorporating these ideas 
more fully within both EU Cohesion policy, and Member State policy architecture, is one of the 
key practical implications of the theoretical findings of the EDORA project. 
The EDORA Future Perspectives analysis has suggested that the incremental processes of 
change represented by the meta-narratives are likely, over the next two decades, to be subject 
to exogenous “shocks” from the many direct and indirect impacts of climate change. The effects 
upon, and opportunities available to, rural Europe will depend to a large extent upon the rapidity 
with which climate change impacts are felt, and the model of economic governance which 
emerges to structure the response. Foresight techniques have provided a set of alternative 
scenarios for rural areas in Europe, a starting point for a discourse on how climate change 
impacts, and opportunities, might be accommodated in future Cohesion policy. 
51
References: 
Arkleton Centre for Rural Development Research (2005). The Territorial Impact of CAP and 
Rural Development Policy, Final Report, ESPON Project 2.1.3, European Spatial Planning 
Observatory Network (ESPON), Aberdeen. 
Bathelt, H, Malmberg, A, Maskell, P (2004) Clusters and knowledge: local buzz, global pipelines 
and the process of knowledge creation, Progress in Human Geography,  Vol. 28 Issue 1, p31-
56. 
Belo Moreira M, Psaltopoulos D and Skuras D, (2009). Rural business development, EDORA 
Working Paper 3, (Annex 1) 
Bengs C et al (2006) Urban Rural Relations in Europe, Final Report ESPON 2006 Project 1.1.2 
http://www.espon.eu/main/Menu_Projects/Menu_ESPON2006Projects/Menu_ThematicProjects/
urbanrural.html
Boehm et al (2009) Interim Report, ESPON Typology Complilation 2013/3/022. 
http://www.espon.eu/main/Menu_Projects/Menu_ScientificPlatform/typologycompilation.html
Braithwaite; K. (2009). Building on What You Have Got – A guide to Optimising Assets, The 
Rural Action Research Programme Briefing Series, Carnegie UK Trust, Dunfermline (UK). 
Camagni, R. (2008). Regional Competitiveness: Towards a Concept of Territorial Capital, in: 
Modelling Regional Scenarios for the Enlarged Europe, Springer, Berlin-Heidelberg, pp.33-47. 
Camagni R et al (2010) Final Report: TIPTAP: Territorial Impact Package for Transport and 
Agricultural 
Policies, 
ESPON 
2013 
Applied 
Research 
Project 
2013/1/6. 
http://www.espon.eu/main/Menu_Projects/Menu_AppliedResearch/tiptap.html
Cernic M and Copus A, (2009), Rural employment, EDORA Working Paper 2, (Annex 1) 
COPTA (2007). Territorial Agenda of the European Union: Towards a more competititve and 
sustainable Europe of diverse regions http://www.eu-territorial-agenda.eu/Pages/Default.aspx
. 
Copus A K (2001) From Core-Periphery to Polycentric Development; Concepts of Spatial and 
Aspatial Peripherality, European Planning Studies, vol 9 No 4 pp539-552 
Copus A, Weingarten P and Noguera J, (2009) Farm structural change, EDORA Working Paper 
9, (Annex 1) 
Copus A K (2010) A Review of Planned and Actual Rural Development Expenditure in the EU 
2007-2013, Deliverable D4.1, 4.2, 5.1, and 5.2. EU-project “Assessing the Impact of Rural 
Development Policies” (RuDI), FP7 – 213034, Stockholm, 73pp. 
Copus A and Noguera J, (2010) The EDORA Typology, EDORA Working Paper 24, (Annex 1) 
Copus A. K., Dax T, Shucksmith M and Meredith D (2011) Cohesion Policy for Rural Areas after 
2013 - A Rationale. Paper presented at DG Regio/RSA Conference: What Future for Cohesion 
Policy; An Academic and Policy Debate, Bled, Slovenia, 16-18 March 2011.  
52 
Courtney P, Psaltopoulos D and Skuras D, (2009) Rural-Urban relationships, EDORA Working 
Paper 4, (Annex 1) 
Courtney P, Skuras D, and Talbot H., (2010), Territorial Cooperation, EDORA Working Paper 
27, (Annex 1)Crowley C, Walsh J, Meredith D (2008) Irish farming at the Millennium - A Census 
Atlas, National Institute for Regional and Spatial Analysis, Maynooth. 
Dax T, Talbot H, Shucksmith M and Kahila P., (2010) Cohesion Policy Implications, EDORA 
Working Paper 28, (Annex 1) 
DEMIFER - Demographic and Migratory Flows affecting European Regions and Cities (2010). 
Final Report. http://www.espon.eu/main/Menu_Projects/Menu_AppliedResearch/demifer.html
Dijkstra L and Poelman H, (2008) Remote Rural Regions, How proximity to a city influences the 
performance of rural regions, Regional Focus No1, DG Regio, European Commission 
http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/sources/docgener/focus/2008_01_rural.pdf
European Commission (2008). Green Paper on Territorial Cohesion. Turning territorial diversity 
into strength, COM(2008) 616 final. 
European Commission (EC) (2010a). Europe 2020: A strategy for smart, sustainable and 
inclusive growth, Brussels, 3 March 2010, COM(20190) 2010. 
European Commission (EC) (2010b) The Reform of the CAP Towards 2020. Consultation 
Document for Impact Assessment. Brussels 
http://ec.europa.eu/agriculture/cap-post-2013/communication/index_en.htm
European Commission (EC) (2010c) Investing in Europe’s Future, Fifth Report on Economic 
and Social Cohesion, Brussels. 
http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/sources/docoffic/official/reports/cohesion5/index_en.cfm
Florida R (2002) The Rise of the Creative Class, Basic Books. 
Freshwater D (2000) The “New” Open Economy: What Has Changed For Rural Areas?, paper 
presented at Conference “European Rural Policy at the Crossroads” The Arkleton Centre for 
Rural 
Development 
Research, 
University 
of 
Aberdeen. 
http://www.abdn.ac.uk/irr/arkleton/conf2000/papers.shtml
Gade O (1991) Dealing with Disparities in Regional Development – The Intermediate 
Socioeconomic Region, Chapter 3 in Gade O, Miller V P, Sommers L M, Planning Issues in 
Marginal Areas, Occasional Papers in Geography and Planning, Vol 3 Spring 1991, Department 
of Geography and Planning, Appalachian State University, Boone, N. Carolina. 
Gade O (1992) Functional and Spatial Problems of Rural Development: General Considerations 
of an Explanatory Model, Chapter 4 in Ó Cinnéide M and Cuddy M, Perspectives on Rural 
Development in Advanced Economies, Centre for Development Studies, Social Sciences 
Research Centre, University College Galway. 
Johansson M and Kupiszewski M, (2009) Rural demography, EDORA Working Paper 1, (Annex 
1) 
53
Kahila P, Nemes G, and High C (2009) Institutional capacity, EDORA Working Paper 7, (Annex 
1) 
Langlais R and Tepecik Dis A, (2009) Climate change, EDORA Working Paper 8, (Annex 1) 
Lee R, Shucksmith M and Talbot H (2010) Synthesis of Thematic Reviews, EDORA Working 
Paper 10 (Annex 1) 
MacLeod M, Van Well L, Sterling J and Kahila P, (2009) Cultural heritage, EDORA Working 
Paper 5, (Annex 1) 
Meredith D, Copus A, Banski J, and Kahila P, (2010) Future Perspectives, EDORA Working 
Paper 26, (Annex 1) 
Noguera J, (2010) Country Profiles Comparative Report, EDORA Working Paper 25, (Annex 1) 
Noguera J, Lückenkötter, del Mar García-García, and Veloso-Pérez E, (2009) Access to 
services of general interest, EDORA Working Paper 6, (Annex 1) 
OECD (2006). The New Rural Paradigm, Polcies and Governance. OECD Rural Policy 
Reviews, Paris. 
Peet J R (1969) The Spatial Expansion of Commercial Agriculture in the Nineteenth Century: A 
Von Thunen Interpretation, Economic Geography, 45, p283. 
Peet J R (1970) Von Thunen Theory and the Dynamics of Agricultural Expansion, Explorations 
in Economic History, 8, p181. 
Peet J R (1972) Influences of the British Market on Agriculture and Related Economic 
Development in Europe, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 56, p1. 
Salamin, G. (2011) Territorial Agenda 2020 and Territorial State and Perspectives as guiding 
documents for future of territorial cohesion, presentation at VASAB conference 7 February, 
Warsawa (Poland). 
http://www.vasab.org/files/documents/events/Annual_conference_2011/3_GS_HU_VATI.pdf 
Saraceno E (1994) Alternative readings of spatial differentiation: The rural versus the local 
economy approach in Italy, European Review of Agricultural Economics, 21 Number 3-4 pp451-
474. 
Schneidewind P et al (2006), The Role of Small and Medium-Sized Towns (SMESTO), Final 
Report, ESPON 1.4.1. 
http://www.espon.eu/main/Menu_Projects/Menu_ESPON2006Projects/Menu_StudiesScientificS
upportProjects/smallandmediumcities.html
Storper, M. (1995) The resurgence of regional economies, ten years later: the region as a nexus 
of untraded interdependencies, European Urban and Regional Studies, Vol. 3: 191-221. 
Suriñach, J., Moreno, R. Autant-Bernard, C., Heblich, S., Iammarino, S., Paci, R. and Parts, E. 
(2010). Intangible Assets and Regional Economic Growth (IAREG), Scientific Executive 
Summary, FP7, SSH – 2007, no. 216813. 
54 
http://www.iareg.org/uploads/media/SCIENTIFIC_EXECUTIVE_SUMMARY_9_7_2010_DEF.pdf  
(accessed 07.09.2010) 
Wallerstein I, (1976) The Modern World-System: Capitalist Agriculture and the Origins of the 
European World-Economy in the Sixteenth Century. New York: Academic Press. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested