devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Change from pdf to jpg on application control utility azure html .net visual studio eg_us_mo_0973110-part614

The Official U.S. Government Resource for Small and Medium-Sized Businesses
U.S. Department of Commerce   |   International Trade Administration   |   U.S. Commercial Service
A BASIC GUIDE TO
EXPO
R
T
I
NG
Change from pdf to jpg on - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi; convert pdf document to jpg
Change from pdf to jpg on - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert from pdf to jpg; .pdf to .jpg converter online
A Basic 
Guide to 
Exporting
11th Edition
Doug Barry, Editor  
U.S. Commercial Service
U.S. Commercial Service—Connecting you to global markets.
A Publication by the U.S. Department of Commerce  •  Washington, DC
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour.
convert pdf images to jpg; convert pdf to jpg
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Allow to change converting image with adjusted width & height; Change image resolution Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in
.net convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf picture to jpg
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
A basic guide to exporting / Doug Barry, editor. -- 11th edition.
pages cm
“A publication by the U.S. Department of Commerce.”
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-0-16-092095-0 (alk. paper)
(Business editor) II. United States. Department of Commerce. 
HF1416.5.B37 2015
658.8’40973--dc23
2015010057
Interviews, success story photos (excluding stock images), and other third-party content provided by and copyright their 
respective owners; used with permission. Under U.S. copyright law, may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without 
written permission from their respective owners.
Stock images acquired from Thinkstock by Getty Images; used with permission. Under U.S. copyright law, may not be 
reproduced, in whole or in part, without written permission from Getty Images, Inc.
Selected forms in Appendix D appear courtesy of Unz & Co., a division of WTS Corporation.
All type is set in the Myriad Pro family, with the exception of the main cover and spine titles, which are set in variations of 
Grotesque MT, and the above Catalogue-in-Publication data, which is set in Share TechMono.
This edition was created using Adobe Creative Cloud 2014 software, including InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator. Work 
was performed on an Apple iMac 2009 and a Microsoft Surface Pro.
Published by the U.S. Department of Commerce, 1401 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20230.
First printing, 2015.
Federal Recycling Program. 
Printed on recycled paper. 
Printed in the United States of America.
This book is intended to provide general guidance for businesses and practitioners in better understanding the basic 
concepts of international trade. It is distributed with the understanding that the authors, editors, and publisher are not 
engaged in rendering legal, accounting, or other professional services. Where legal or other expert assistance is required, 
the services of a competent professional should be sought. This book contains information on exporting that was current 
as of the date of publication. While every effort has been made to make it as complete and accurate as possible, readers 
should be aware that all information that is contained herein is subject to change without notice.
export.gov/basicguide
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Web Security. Your PDF and JPG files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
conversion of pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg format
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputDirectory = @"C:\output\"; // Convert tiff to jpg and show How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C#
convert pdf to jpg batch; changing pdf to jpg
Exporting for the first time?
Exported before, but things have changed?
Need answers, but not sure how or where to get them?
This is the book you need.
For more than 70 years, A Basic Guide to Exporting has given companies the information they need 
to establish and grow their business in international markets.
Whether you’re new to exporting or just want to learn the latest ideas and techniques, and 
whether your product is a good or a service, this new 11th Edition—completely rewritten, revised, 
and updated—will give you the nuts-and-bolts information you need.
Here are just some of the topics we’ll cover:
• How to identify markets for your company’s products (Chapters 3 and 6)
• How to create an export plan (Chapter 2)
• How to finance your export transactions (Chapter 15)
• The best methods of handling orders and shipments (Chapters 12 and 13)
• Sources of free or low-cost export counseling (Chapter 4)
In addition, this book also includes:
• Real-life success stories from companies we’ve counseled on exporting
• Sample forms and letters
• Details on how to get free or low-cost U.S. government export support
Turn the page, and let’s begin . . .
iii
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
convert .pdf to .jpg online; pdf to jpg converter
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Users may easily change image size, rotate image angle, set image rotation in dpi Covert JPG & JBIG2 image with high-quality; Provide user-friendly interface
.pdf to jpg converter online; change format from pdf to jpg
Acknowledgments
None of the people responsible for this newest 11th 
Edition of A Basic Guide to Exporting was alive when the 
first one came off the printing press in 1936. At that time 
and for years after, exporting was dominated by very 
large companies. That may be why over the next 73 years 
there were only nine editions—the audience was limited.
Not anymore. More than 40,000 copies of the 10th 
Edition and 10th Revised Edition have been printed 
since 2011. But since then, much has changed on the 
world economic scene, including a record 300,000 U.S. 
exporting companies in 2013.
This completely updated and rewritten 11th Edition is 
dedicated to and a practical reference for the thousands 
of additional companies, mostly small and medium-size, 
that, in the coming years, will export for the first time or 
expand into additional export markets.
A new generation of export enablers is responsible for 
the book you are holding, or are viewing on your mobile 
device—a technology that wasn’t even science fiction 
in 1936! Among the many contributors to this book are 
Anand Basu and Antwaun Griffin of the senior leadership 
team of the U.S. Commercial Service, who early on 
supported the need for a new edition. Budget analyst 
Carolyn McNeill made sure commitments were kept.
Making important editorial contributions were Curt 
Cultice and Roza Pace, a whiz at explaining free trade 
agreements. Student interns Brian Gerrard and Sara 
Abu-Odeh kept track of hundreds of text changes and 
crunched innumerable bits of data for the charts.
Credit for the look and feel of the book goes to our 
designer Jason Scheiner. It was no small feat to integrate 
all the photos, charts, samples, stories, text pullouts, 
and changes. He also made sure that the print shop was 
faithful to the design.
This book contains many new facts, figures, and analyses. 
Dozens of experts from different government trade 
promotion agencies reviewed sections of the book and 
suggested changes. Special thanks to Jamie Rose of the 
U.S. Department of the Treasury for coordinating input 
on the export controls section and to Yuki Fujiyama from 
the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Office of Financial 
and Insurance Industries for expanding the Trade  
Finance section.
Our colleague April Miller served as business manager for 
the project, and her knowledge of how our system works 
ensured that the book appeared while topics and trends 
are fresh.
Lastly, thanks to Progressive Publishing Services who 
provided text editing services and the index. Our friends 
at the Government Printing Office helped us find them, 
then later selected the print shop and arranged for book 
distribution through their commercial sales program.
To you, the reader, we hope this book challenges 
your assumptions about engaging in the world of 
international business and gives you the confidence to 
become an even greater success. Like the businesspeople 
featured in the pages that follow, we hope you will not 
only sell to the world—we hope you’ll help make it a 
better place.
Doug Barry, Editor  
Washington, D.C.  •  2015
iv
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
bulk pdf to jpg; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
similar software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
pdf to jpeg converter; best convert pdf to jpg
v
U.S. Commercial Service  •  A Basic Guide to Exporting
Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction  
The World Is Open for Your Business .........1
Success Story: DeFeet International .................................8
Chapter 2  
Developing an Export Strategy ..............11
Sample Outline of an Export Plan ..................................22
Sample Elements of an Export Plan ..............................23
Success Story: Urban Planet Mobile ..............................28
Chapter 3  
Developing a Marketing Plan ................31
Success Story: Zeigler Brothers .......................................42
Chapter 4  
Export Advice .......................................45
Success Story: Advanced Superabrasives ....................56
Chapter 5  
Methods and Channels ..........................59
Choosing a Foreign Representative or Distributor ...70
Success Story: Infinity Air ..................................................72
Chapter 6  
Finding Qualified Buyers .......................75
Who Is the “Ideal” International Buyer? ........................83
Chapter 7  
Tech Licensing and Joint Ventures ..........85
Success Story: Spancrete Machinery Corporation ....88
Chapter 8  
Preparing Your Product for Export .........91
Success Story: Avazzia .......................................................96
Chapter 9  
Exporting Services ................................99
Success Story: Home Instead Senior Care .................104
Chapter 10  
International Legal Considerations .......107
Intellectual Property ........................................................116
Chapter 11  
Going Online: E-Exporting Tools for  
Small Businesses .................................121
Success Story: NuStep .....................................................132
Chapter 12  
Shipping Your Product .........................135
Success Story: Bassetts Ice Cream Company ............144
Chapter 13  
Pricing, Quotations, and Terms .............147
Success Story: Alignment Simple Solutions .............154
Chapter 14  
Methods of Payment ............................157
Success Story: Giant Loop ..............................................166
Chapter 15  
Financing Export Transactions ..............169
Success Story: Patton Electronics Company .............180
Chapter 16  
Business Travel Abroad .........................183
Business Culture Tips........................................................187
Success Story: Lightning Eliminators ..........................190
Chapter 17  
Selling Overseas and After-Sales Service ..193
Chapter 18  
Rules of Origin for FTAs ........................201
Example Rules of Origin ..................................................207
Success Story: Jet Incorporated ....................................214
Chapter 19  
Conclusion ..........................................217
Appendices  
A: Glossary of Terms .............................218
B: Definitions of Abbreviations .............224
C: Free Trade Agreements Chart ............225
D: Forms ..............................................226
Index ..................................................244
About the U.S. Commercial Service .......249
1
U.S. Commercial Service  •  A Basic Guide to Exporting
Chapter 1: Introduction  
The World Is Open 
for Your Business
In this chapter . . .
• Selling globally is easier than ever.
• More help than ever is available.
• Your assumptions may not be accurate.
• Transform your business—and yourself.
The World Is Open for Business—Your Business
Today, it’s easier than ever for a company like yours, regardless of size, to sell goods and services 
across the globe. Small and medium-sized companies in the United States are exporting more 
than ever before. In 2013, more than 300,000 small and medium-sized U.S. companies exported to 
at least one international market—nearly 28 percent more than in 2005, the year in which the 
10th Edition of this book was first published. In 2013, the value of goods and services exports was 
an impressive $2.28 trillion, nearly a 25 percent increase since 2010. And 2014 topped the 
previous year, with exports valued at $2.34 trillion.
Additional Reasons to Explore or Expand Exporting
Global trade in goods and services is likely to grow in the future. 
The new World Trade Agreement on trade facilitation that was 
introduced at the end of 2013 and renegotiated in 2014 will 
reportedly add $1 trillion to the global gross domestic product (GDP) 
once it is fully implemented. This agreement compels the World 
Trade Organization (WTO) members to improve customs procedures 
and cut regulatory red tape, speeding the flow of goods and services 
across borders and reducing the costs involved. The U.S. government 
will create a “single window” system that has some of the same 
benefits and efficiencies as the WTO effort.
When this edition of A Basic Guide to Exporting went to press, the United States was in an 
advanced stage of negotiating trade agreements with the European Union and countries in the 
Asia-Pacific region, including the large market of Japan. Together, these markets represent 50 
U.S. Total Annual Exports  
(USD Trillions, 2010–14)
Year
Value
Increase (%)
2009
1.570
2010
1.831
16.62
2011
2.103
14.86
2012
2.216
5.37
2013
2.280
2.89
2014
2.345
2.85
Source: U.S. Census Bureau.
U.S. Commercial Service  •  A Basic Guide to Exporting
2
percent of total global GDP and 30 percent of global trade. These agreements, if 
ratified, will join agreements already in place, including the North American Free 
Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the Central America and Dominican Republic Free 
Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR). More than reducing the duties on imported goods 
by member countries and thus making these products cheaper for consumers, 
the agreements also generate additional business opportunities by strengthening 
intellectual property protections, simplifying regulations, opening up the service 
sectors and government contracting procedures, and generally treating foreign 
companies the same as domestic companies. For more information on free trade 
agreements see our publication Free Trade Agreements: 20 Ways to Grow Your Business 
(International Trade Administration, 2013).
If you have a web presence, you have a global marketing and order-taking platform. 
For a few more dollars, you can process credit card payments for buyers in Australia 
or translate key pages into Spanish and other languages to further your reach. During 
the next few years, worldwide B2C e-commerce is projected to nearly double to  
$2.2 trillion with the fastest growth in the Asia-Pacific. You’ll want to be in the game 
as sales soar.
Do You Want More Sales Channels?
Online B2B and B2C marketplaces offer virtual storefronts and a ready-made global 
army of shoppers. They also offer payment solutions, and you can choose a shipper 
that will take care of the required documentation for you. The shippers want to 
help make things easier too, and many offer international business advice, freight 
forwarding and customs brokerage services, cost calculators, and in some cases, 
financing. Plus, they’ll pick up goods and documents from your back door and 
deliver them to almost any address in the world. And you can track everything on 
their website. Some e-commerce platforms will arrange to ship your goods to one or 
more of their fulfillment warehouses located in major commercial centers around the 
world. As items are sold and shipped quickly to buyers, you can restock the goods 
by sending larger quantities to the fulfillment centers, generally at less cost than 
shipping one item at a time from your place of business in the United States.
Want even more sales channels? If web-based marketing and sales are insufficient 
to meet your sales growth appetite, you can attend trade shows in the United States 
where buyers from around the world come to purchase U.S. goods and services. 
Show organizers will facilitate introductions to the buyers, working with agencies 
of the U.S. government to provide matchmaking services on the show floor. These 
same government agencies can arrange for you to attend shows in other countries, 
where the connections and influence of your embassy network can save you time 
and money generating new business. Government agencies can find buyers for you 
and arrange introductions in more than 100 countries. Call this service “customized 
business matchmaking.” 
3
Chapter 1: Introduction—The World Is Open for Your Business
Channels can include:
• Direct to end-user
• Distributors in country
• Supplier to the U.S. government in a foreign country
• Your e-commerce website
• A third-party e-commerce platform where you handle fulfillment
• A third-party e-commerce where they handle fulfillment
• Supplier to a large U.S. company with international sales
• Franchise your business
You are not limited to one of these channels. Today’s global trading system is ideal for the smaller 
company employing more than one marketing and sales channel to sell into multiple overseas 
markets. But most U.S. exporters currently sell to one country market—Canada, for example. And 
the smaller the company, the less likely it is to export to more than one country. For example, 
60 percent of all exporters with fewer than 19 employees sold to one country market in 2005. 
Imagine the boost in the bottom line if they could double the number of countries they sell to.
Why Don’t More Small Companies Export to More than a Single Market?
One reason is fear. It’s not very fear inducing to sell to a buyer in Canada who seems not so 
far away, speaks the same language, and operates under a similar legal system. Croatia or 
Myanmar are perceived to be more risky. But are they? Many 
U.S. companies are doing good business there now. In general, 
their “secret sauce” boils down to careful planning, relying on 
assistance provided by government export promotion agencies, 
good basic business fundamentals including excellent customer 
service, and a willingness if needed to get on a plane to visit a 
prospective customer.
The opportunity for selling into a single region, such as Central 
America, and taking advantage of free trade agreements is 
substantial. The help available and discussed in this book can 
quickly expand your thinking—and your sales—from one market 
to many.
In choosing from among these channels, markets, and countries, 
what’s the best strategy for your business? There’s help for that 
too—from private consultants, from your home state and local 
U.S. government sources, from the web, and from this book. And 
much of the help is free or costs very little. It is easy to access, 
easy to use. Think of this help as your Global Entrepreneurship 
Ecosystem (GEE). According to The World Is Your Market: Exporting Made Easier for Small Businesses 
(Braddock Communications, 2013), your GEE is a social network of key contacts that can help you 
grow your international sales. 
Your GEE Checklist
• Local U.S. Commercial Service office
• Regional Ex-Im Bank office
• Freight forwarder/customs broker
• World Trade Center
• Port Authority
• Chamber of Commerce
• State office of international trade
• A university business school
• Mayor’s office/Sister City program
• Small Business Development Center
• International logistics company
• Other relevant companies or organizations
U.S. Commercial Service  •  A Basic Guide to Exporting
4
Global Business Assumptions
Old Assumption
New Assumption
Exporting is too risky.
Exporting to some markets, such as Canada, is no more risky than 
selling in the United States. Different international markets have 
different levels of risks. Almost any perceived risk can be identified 
and reduced by using the affordable export assistance  
now available.
Getting paid is 
cumbersome, and I’ll lose 
my shirt.
Trade finance and global banking have evolved to the point where 
buying and selling things internationally is routine, safe, and 
efficient. Reliable payment collection methods are numerous and 
include letters of credit through banks, credit cards, and online 
payments. Some delivery companies will even collect payment at 
the buyer’s back door.
Exporting is too 
complicated.
Most exporting requires minimal paperwork. Researching markets 
and finding buyers can in many instances be done from your 
computer using free or low-cost information. Third-party export 
facilitators, such as e-commerce platforms, can remove much of the 
complexity and risk, real or assumed.
My domestic market is 
secure. I don’t need  
to export.
Globalization has made it easier to buy and sell goods in multiple 
markets. Few markets remain static, and new markets are constantly 
opening to competition. Most U.S. businesses are involved in or 
affected by international business, whether they realize it or not. 
More small and medium-size U.S. companies need an international 
strategy that includes diversifying markets. It turns out that 
exporting is often a tremendous learning experience for those who 
are open to the lessons, resulting in better products and services 
and valuable experiences for the practitioners.
I’m too small to go global.
No company is too small to go global. In fact, nearly 30 percent of all 
U.S. exporters in 2005 had fewer than 19 employees, and many had 
fewer than five.
My product or service 
probably won’t sell outside 
the United States.
If your product or service sells well in the United States, there’s a 
good chance an overseas market can be found for it. What’s more, 
help is available to test acceptance of your service or product 
in more than 100 countries around the globe. In some markets, 
you may have to make some modifications because of cultural or 
regulatory differences, but by learning how to sell into another 
market, you will become a better marketer, and your company will 
be more successful in all markets in which it competes.
I won’t be successful 
because I don’t speak 
another language and have 
never been abroad.
Cultural knowledge and business etiquette are always helpful, but 
you can pick these things up as you go. The English language will 
take you a very long way, and help is readily available for situations 
in which interpreters and translators are necessary. We Americans 
regularly lampoon ourselves for being “ugly.” A level of introspection 
and culturally specific knowledge can help prevent potentially deal-
breaking faux pas, but a friendly disposition and willingness to learn 
can make up for a multitude of unintended mistakes.
I have no idea where to turn 
for help.
There is plenty of help available, much of it free. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested