U.S. Commercial Service  •  A Basic Guide to Exporting
92
Questions to Consider
You must consider several issues when you are thinking of selling overseas, including:
• What foreign needs does your product satisfy?
• What products should your company offer abroad?
• Should your company modify its domestic market product for sale abroad? 
Should it develop a new product for the foreign market?
• What specific features, such as design, color, size, packaging, brand, labels, and 
warranty, should your product have? How important are languages or  
cultural differences?
• What specific services, warranties, and spare parts are necessary abroad at the 
presale and postsale stages? 
• Are your company’s service and repair facilities adequate?
Product Adaptation
To enter a foreign market successfully, your company may have to modify its 
product to conform to government regulations, geographic and climatic conditions, 
buyer preferences, or standards of living. 
Your company may also need to modify 
its product to facilitate shipment or to 
compensate for possible differences in 
engineering and design standards. Foreign 
government product regulations are common 
in international trade and are expected to 
expand in the future. These regulations 
can take the form of high tariffs, or they 
can be nontariff barriers, such as industrial 
regulations or product specifications. 
Governments impose regulations for several reasons:
• To protect domestic industries from foreign competition
• To protect the health and safety of their citizens
• To force importers to comply with environmental controls
• To ensure that importers meet local requirements for electrical or  
measurement systems
• To restrict the flow of goods originating in or having components from  
certain countries
• To protect their citizens from cultural influences deemed inappropriate
Detailed information on regulations imposed by foreign countries is available 
through your local U.S. Commercial Service office. When a foreign government 
imposes particularly onerous or discriminatory barriers, your company may be 
able to obtain help from the U.S. government to press for their removal. For more 
information, call (202) 395-3230 or visit ustr.gov.
International buyers may have 
different expectations than U.S. 
buyers. Packaging, advertising, 
and labeling requirements can 
all vary between markets.
Change pdf file to jpg file - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
change pdf file to jpg online; bulk pdf to jpg
Change pdf file to jpg file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
best pdf to jpg converter; reader convert pdf to jpg
93
Chapter 8: Preparing Your Product for Export
You can also contact the Office of Trade Agreements Negotiations and Compliance (TANC). TANC 
systematically monitors, investigates, and evaluates foreign government compliance with our 
international trade agreements to ensure that U.S. companies and workers receive the full benefit 
of these agreements. This free program is available to assist all U.S. exporters or investors facing 
trade barriers, but it is particularly valuable to small and medium-sized companies, which often 
lack the resources or expertise to deal with these problems. It is the U.S. government’s one-stop 
shop for getting help reducing or eliminating those barriers. 
The TANC website includes a fully searchable database containing the texts of approximately 250 
international trade agreements. To assist, TANC provides examples of the most common foreign 
government-imposed trade barriers at 1.usa.gov/1yRJbr5. This service enables U.S. exporters to 
file complaints about foreign government-imposed trade barriers or unfair trade situations in 
foreign markets.
Buyer preferences in a foreign market may also lead you to modify your product. Local customs, 
such as religious practices or the use of leisure time, often determine whether a product is 
marketable. The sensory impression a product makes, such as taste, smell, or a visual effect, 
may also be a critical factor. For example, Japanese consumers tend to prefer certain kinds of 
packaging, leading many U.S. companies to redesign cartons and packages that are destined for 
the Japanese market. Body size may also be an issue. If a product is made for U.S. body types, it 
may not work for people of smaller statures.
Market potential must be large enough to justify the direct and indirect costs involved in product 
adaptation. Your company should assess the costs to be incurred and, though it may be difficult, 
should determine the increased revenues expected from adaptation. The decision to adapt a 
product is based partly on the degree of commitment to the specific foreign market; a company 
with short-term goals will probably have a different perspective than a company with long- 
term goals.
Engineering and Redesign
In addition to adaptations related to cultural and consumer preferences, your company should be 
aware that even fundamental aspects of products may require changing. For example, electrical 
standards in many foreign countries differ from those in the United States. It’s not unusual to find 
phases, cycles, or voltages (for both residential and commercial 
use) that would damage or impair the operating efficiency of 
equipment designed for use in the United States. Electrical 
standards sometimes vary even within the same country. 
Knowing the requirements, the manufacturer can determine 
whether a special motor must be substituted or if a different 
drive ratio can be achieved to meet the desired operating 
revolutions per minute.
Similarly, many kinds of equipment must be engineered in the metric system for integration with 
other pieces of equipment or for compliance with the standards of a given country. The United 
States is virtually alone in its adherence to a nonmetric system, and U.S. companies that compete 
successfully in the global market realize that conversion to metric measurement is an important 
detail in selling to overseas customers. Even instruction or maintenance manuals should provide 
Electrical standards can vary wildly 
between, and sometimes within, 
different international markets.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the PDF files with the
convert pdf pictures to jpg; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
batch convert pdf to jpg online; changing pdf file to jpg
U.S. Commercial Service  •  A Basic Guide to Exporting
94
dimensions in centimeters, weights in grams or kilos, and temperatures in degrees 
Celsius. Information on foreign standards and certification systems is available from 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology (nist.gov).
Branding, Labeling, and Packaging
Consumers are concerned with both the product itself and the product’s secondary 
features, such as packaging, warranties, and services. Branding and labeling products 
in foreign markets raise new considerations for your company, such as:
• Are international brand names 
important to promote and distinguish 
a product? Conversely, should local 
brands or private labels be used to 
heighten local interest?
• Are the colors used on labels and 
packages offensive or attractive to 
the foreign buyer? For example, in 
some countries certain colors are 
associated with death.
• Can labels and instructions be produced in official or customary languages if 
required by law or practice?
• Does information on product content and country of origin have to be provided?
• Are weights and measures stated in the local unit? Even with consumer products, 
packaging and describing contents in metric measurements (e.g., kilograms, 
liters) can be important.
• Must each item be labeled 
individually? What is the language 
of the labeling? For example, “Made 
in the USA” may not be acceptable; 
the product may need to be labeled 
in the language spoken by the 
country’s consumers. There may be 
special labeling requirements for 
foods, pharmaceuticals, and  
other products.
• Are local tastes and knowledge considered? A cereal box with the picture of a 
U.S. athlete on it may not be as attractive to overseas consumers as the picture of 
a local sports hero.
Installation
Another element of product preparation that your company should consider is 
the ease of installing the product overseas. If technicians or engineers are needed 
overseas to assist in installation, your company should minimize their time in the field 
if possible. To do so, your company may wish to preassemble or pretest the product 
before shipping or to provide training for local service providers through the web, 
Your U.S. brand name is important 
to you, but it may be less important 
to foreign consumers. On the other 
hand, in some places, it may be more 
valuable than it is in the U.S.
A visible endorsement from a famous 
person may get you sales at home, but 
the same person may be unknown—
or, worse, disliked—elsewhere.
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Components to combine various scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET.
best way to convert pdf to jpg; change file from pdf to jpg on
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Append one PDF file to the end
.pdf to .jpg converter online; convert pdf into jpg online
95
Chapter 8: Preparing Your Product for Export
training seminars, or DVDs. Zeigler Brothers, the fish food supplier profiled in Chapter 3, uses 
visual aids to help train people who use their products.
Your company may consider disassembling the product for shipment and reassembling it 
abroad. This method can save your company shipping costs, but it may delay payment if the 
sale is contingent on an assembled product. Your company should be careful to provide all 
product information, such as training manuals, installation instructions (even relatively simple 
instructions), and parts lists, in the local language.
Warranties
Your company should consider carefully the terms of a warranty on the product (and be very 
specific about what the warranty covers) because the buyer will expect a specific level of 
performance and a guarantee that it will be achieved. Levels of expectation and rights for a 
warranty vary by country, depending on the country’s level of development, its competitive 
practices, the activism of consumer groups, the local standards of production quality, and other 
factors. Product service guarantees are important because customers overseas typically have 
service expectations as high as or greater than those of U.S. customers.
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
c# pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc. PowerPoint.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
pdf to jpg converter; change from pdf to jpg
U.S. Commercial Service  •  A Basic Guide to Exporting
96
Success Story  
Working Through the Pain  
Avazzia
“Our sales generate increased cash  
flow that helps us meet payroll;  
so you might say I’m bullish on  
our export potential.”
—Tim Smith, Chief Executive Officer
The Company
Tim Smith helped put a man on the moon. 
Given that career highlight, what would be an 
appropriate sequel for a veteran manager who 
spent his career at Texas Instruments developing 
computer chips for the Apollo space program and 
major military systems? 
“My dad taught me all the basics of electronics, 
so at the age of 12, I was hardwiring circuits in 
our home,” Smith says. “Then in high school I had 
a great electronics teacher, which motivated me 
even further and put me on my career path.”
After spending 21 years at Texas Instruments in 
chip design, manufacturing, and research and 
development, Smith was ready for a change. And 
after learning that a close friend had diabetic 
neuropathy, Smith thought he could help. Soon 
after leaving Texas Instruments, he learned about 
the Russian space program’s use of electronic 
devices to manage chronic and acute pain. 
“Working out of my garage, I familiarized myself 
with the process of applying electrical signals to 
humans to turn on the body’s neuropeptides—the 
body’s defense systems that promote the healing 
process and alleviate pain,” Smith says. “In doing 
so, I decided to start my own company, Avazzia, 
which means ‘beauty and freedom of health.’” 
For Smith, it wasn’t about just making a profit; it 
was a quality-of-life issue. “One-third of Americans 
suffer from chronic pain, so there’s always a 
need,” he says. “Also, more Americans die from 
prescription painkillers than from street drugs. 
There’s real opportunity for making a difference in 
the lives of millions of people.” 
Smith eventually hired staff and developed 11 
varieties of therapy devices and 50 accessories. 
Marketing to hospitals, doctors’ offices, and 
rehabilitation centers, Avazzia also provides 
training to medical staff. In the United States, the 
devices are available only through prescription, 
whereas overseas, a prescription is not required. To 
date, his product has proven to be very effective. 
Smith reports that two-thirds of customers 
responding to his survey reported reduced use of 
pain medications and had improved sleep; many 
no longer needed to take oxytocin. 
C# TIFF: How to Use C#.NET Code to Compress TIFF Image File
C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object. List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); / Step1: Load image to REImage object. foreach (string file in
convert pdf to jpg for online; c# convert pdf to jpg
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG
convert online pdf to jpg; convert from pdf to jpg
97
Success Story: Avazzia
The Challenge
Smith first looked toward international markets 
in 2008 by selling to Taiwan. He’s also had good 
success in Canada and Malaysia, and has made 
sales in Korea, Singapore, and England. To 
overcome import requirements, he began working 
with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 
and International Standards Organization (ISO) to 
obtain product quality and safety certifications; 
he also gained the CB internationally accepted 
approval for safety. With these approvals, his 
products are usually accepted in most countries, 
thus removing a major barrier to trade. 
About a year ago, Smith started eyeing India as 
a potential destination due to its large English-
speaking population and a growing middle 
class. But when he previously tried to start doing 
business in new markets, it took several months 
and costly trial-and-error to locate distributors. 
How could he quickly find a good distributor?
The Solution
At a local chamber of commerce event in 2012, 
Smith was introduced to Trade Specialist Richard 
Ryan of the U.S. Commercial Service in north Texas. 
Smith later took advantage of business counseling 
and learned more about entry strategies. Smith 
says, “I knew that India’s population generally tries 
to avoid drugs, but the additional market research 
really reaffirmed the Indian medical community 
was very receptive to nondrug therapies.” 
Working with U.S. Commercial Service colleagues 
in New Delhi, India, Ryan helped Smith seek out 
potential Indian distributors. Avazzia’s needs 
were matched with several prospective Indian 
distributors, then Smith flew to India.
“I interviewed several distributors and really 
‘clicked’ with one in particular—we both had 
similar technology backgrounds,” Smith says. 
“Having U.S. government backing also gave me 
added credibility with him, so it worked out well, 
and I ended up signing him as a distributor.” 
The distributor purchased an initial stock of 
Avazzia products and showcased them at a trade 
show. Thirty Indian medical doctors came to 
Avazzia’s booth, generating additional sales that 
continue to this day. Now, Avazzia is working on 
selling to a major sports injury rehabilitation clinic 
that treats 500 patients per week. 
Lessons Learned
Smith originally assumed that international 
customers would be looking to pay the lowest 
price, regardless of quality. “But what I found is 
that if you have a quality product, people will lay 
out the cash to buy it,” he says. 
So what does the future hold for Avazzia? Smith’s 
company has grown to 15 employees. “Exports 
account for 20 percent of our overall sales, a figure 
that could grow to 50 percent within the next 2 
years,” he says. His next big focus is Mexico, with 
plans to expand into Latin America, where the 
United States has several free trade agreements. 
Oh, and what about Smith’s friend who suffered 
from diabetic neuropathy? He continues to use 
Avazzia technology, which has dramatically 
reduced his need for painkilling medications. 
Action
“If you have no previous international trade or 
export experience, do your homework first and 
take advantage of the U.S. Commercial Service. 
If I had known 10 years ago what I know today, I 
would have started selling to Europe early on.
“Leverage your business experience; you may have 
a greater skill set than you realize. For example, if 
you’ve sold here in the United States, that’s a great 
asset to becoming a successful exporter.” 
99
U.S. Commercial Service  •  A Basic Guide to Exporting
Chapter 9  
Exporting Services
In this chapter . . .
• Role of the service sector in the United States  
and in world economies
• Differences between service and product exporting
• Places where service exporters can find assistance
The United States is the world’s premier producer and exporter of services. As the largest 
component of the U.S. economy, the service sector includes all private-sector economic activity 
other than agriculture, mining, construction, and manufacturing. The service sector accounts for 
90 million jobs, which is nearly 80 percent of the private-sector gross domestic product (GDP). 
In the future, the service sector will loom even larger in the U.S. economy. Small and medium-
sized entrepreneurial companies—those employing fewer than 500 employees—overwhelmingly 
lead this service-driven business expansion. More than 4 million small U.S. service companies 
account for more than 16 million jobs. Although small service companies make up most of the 
service sector, many of the most prominent U.S. service exporters are large companies. Seven  
of the 30 companies that constitute the widely cited Dow Jones Industrial Average are  
service companies.
The dominant role that services play throughout the U.S. economy translates into leadership 
in technology advancement, as well as growth in skilled jobs and global competitiveness. U.S. 
service exports more than doubled between 1990 and 2000—increasing from $148 billion in 1990 
to $299 billion in 2000. Growth continued to $404 billion in 2006, $632 billion in 2012, and $682 
billion in 2013. Major markets for U.S. services include the European Union, Japan, and Canada. 
Mexico is the largest emerging market for U.S. service exports.
Service Exports with High Growth Potential
Travel and Tourism
The largest single category within the U.S. service sector encompasses all travel- and tourism-
related businesses, including recreational and cultural services. The industry is diverse and 
U.S. Commercial Service  •  A Basic Guide to Exporting
100
encompasses services in transportation, lodging, food and beverage, recreation, and 
purchase of incidentals consumed while in transit. Export sales for this sector in 2013 
were $140 billion. Recently, there has been an increase in visitors from China.
Environmental Services
The environmental technologies 
industry incorporates all goods 
and services that generate revenue 
associated with environmental 
protection, assessment, 
compliance with environmental 
regulations, pollution control, 
waste management, remediation 
of contaminated property, design 
and operation of environmental 
infrastructure, and provision and 
delivery of environmental resources. 
The industry has evolved in 
response to growing concern about 
the risks and costs of pollution and 
about the enactment of pollution 
control legislation in the United 
States and around the world. The 
United States is the largest producer 
and consumer of environmental 
technologies in the world.
Transportation Services
This sector encompasses aviation, ocean shipping, inland waterways, railroads, 
trucking, pipelines, and intermodal services, as well as ancillary and support services 
in ports, airports, rail yards, and truck terminals. Transportation is the indispensable 
service for international trade in goods, moving all manufactured, mining, and 
agricultural products to market as well as transporting people engaged in business, 
travel, and tourism. Well aware that if you are welcoming Asian tourists to your 
service business, you are generating export sales, the U.S. Commercial Service has 
a global team dedicated to generating more visits from international travelers. 
Representatives of this branch of the Department of Commerce will be glad to help 
you promote your services and make overseas customers even more welcome.
Banking, Financial, and Insurance Services
U.S. financial institutions are very competitive internationally, particularly when they 
offer account management, credit card operations, and collection management. U.S. 
insurers offer valuable services, ranging from underwriting and risk evaluation to 
insurance operations and management contracts in the international marketplace.
U.S. Service Exports by Country  
(USD Billions, 2011–2014)
Country
2011
2012
2013
2014*
Canada
58.319 61.533 63.281 47.222
United 
Kingdom
57.314 59.173 60.269 46.729
Japan
43.830 46.529 46.270 35.058
China
28.435 33.090 37.761 31.090
Mexico
26.436 28.205 29.855 22.331
Germany
27.070 27.004 27.529 21.108
Brazil
23.270 25.046 26.640 20.943
South Korea 16.664 17.986 20.904 15.589
France
18.721 17.858 19.488 15.474
India
11.780 12.350 13.470 10.688
Italy
9.199
8.716
9.352
7.387
Saudi Arabia 6.465
7.947
9.240
6.779
All Other 
Countries
300.280 309.415 323.352 280.398
Source: U.S. Census Bureau. * Data through September 2014
101
Chapter 9: Exporting Services
Telecommunications and Information Services
This sector includes companies that 
generate, process, and export such 
electronic commerce activities as e-mail, 
funds transfer, and data interchange, 
as well as data processing, network 
services, electronic information services, 
and professional computer services. 
The United States leads the world in 
marketing new technologies and enjoys 
a competitive advantage in computer 
operations, data processing and 
transmission, online services, computer 
consulting, and systems integration. 
Education and Training Services
Management training, technical training, 
and English language training are areas  
in which U.S. expertise remains 
unchallenged. The export market for such 
training is almost limitless, encompassing 
most industry sectors for products and services.
Commercial, Professional, and Technical Services
This sector comprises accounting, advertising, and legal and 
management consulting services. The international market 
for those services is expanding at a more rapid rate than the 
U.S. domestic market. Organizations and business enterprises 
all over the world look to U.S. companies, as leaders in these 
sectors, for advice and assistance. 
Entertainment
U.S.–filmed entertainment and U.S.–recorded music have 
been very successful in appealing to audiences worldwide. 
U.S. film companies license and sell rights to exhibit films 
in movie theaters, on television, on video cassettes, and 
on DVDs and CDs. U.S. music has been successful in both 
English-speaking and non-English-speaking countries. 
Architectural, Construction, and Engineering Services
The vast experience and technological leadership of 
the U.S. construction industry, as well as special skills in 
operations, maintenance, and management, frequently 
U.S. Service Exports by Industry  
(USD Millions, 2012–14)
Industry
2012
2013
2014
Maintenance and Repair 15.115
16.295
18.098
Transportation
83.592
87.267
89.681
Travel (Including 
Educational)
161.249
173.131
179.038
Insurance Services
16.534
16.096
16.439
Financial Services
76.605
84.066
89.475
Intellectual Property
125.492
129.178
134.897
Telecommunications, 
Computer Services, and 
Information Services
32.103
33.409
33.292
Other Business Services
119.892
123.447
125.597
Government Services
24.267
24.522
23.817
Total
654.849
687.411
718.333
Source: U.S. Census Bureau.
Exporting services provides unique 
challenges, because the export is 
often invisible or intangible. Most 
likely, this will mean:
• More travel. Without a tangible product, you  
may have to make special efforts to elevate the 
profile of your company and the credibility of  
your statements about its services.
• Awareness of labor requirements. You may be  
in-country for an extended period of time, or  
you may need to hire local workers. Be aware  
of your legal obligations, such as securing  
work permits.
• More intensive market research. Market  
research methodologies and business  
opportunity indicators are unique for service 
companies, often requiring more in-depth  
and detailed activities, information, and 
intelligence than are routine for  
exporting goods.
U.S. Commercial Service  •  A Basic Guide to Exporting
102
give U.S. companies a competitive edge in international projects. U.S. companies 
with expertise in specialized fields, such as electric-power utilities, construction, 
bioremediation, and engineering services, are similarly competitive. 
E-Business
This sector, which can be service or product oriented, is expected to grow 
dramatically. It is estimated that there are already 600 million Internet users 
worldwide—but that figure represents only a small chunk of the world’s population. 
China’s B2C e-commerce platforms have become a popular means for Chinese 
consumers to purchase U.S. brands. 
Free Trade Agreements and Service Exports
Most free trade agreements include provisions that make it easier for participants 
to sell services on a nondiscriminatory basis. The U.S. currently has agreements with 
20 countries. Consider targeting some of these countries for expanding your service 
business beyond U.S. borders. If you are a service provider seeking international 
contracts, consider letting visitors to your website know that the U.S. free trade 
agreements make it easy for purchasers in participating countries to work with you.
Aspects of Service Exports
Services can be crucial in stimulating goods exports and are critical in maintaining 
those transactions. Many U.S. merchandise exports would not take place if they were 
not supported by such service activities as banking, insurance, and transportation. 
The many obvious differences between services and products include differences 
in tangibility and customer involvement. 
Because services are intangible, you may find 
that communicating a service offer is more 
difficult than communicating a product offer. 
Also, services frequently must be tailored to the 
specific needs of the client. Such adaptation often 
necessitates the client’s direct participation and 
cooperation. Involving the client, in turn, calls for 
interpersonal skills and cultural sensitivity on the 
part of the service provider.
The intangibility of services makes financing somewhat more difficult—given that no 
form of collateral is involved—and financial institutions may be less willing to provide 
financial support to your company. However, many public and private institutions will 
provide financial assistance to creditworthy service exporters. Trade organizations 
offer two important finance services under various terms and conditions. One is a 
guarantee program that requires the participation of an approved lender; the other 
program provides loans or grants to the exporter or a foreign government. Exporters 
who insure their accounts receivable against commercial credit and political risk loss 
are usually able to secure financing from commercial banks and other institutions at 
lower rates and on a more liberal basis than would otherwise be the case.
Service exports such as 
banking, insurance, and 
transportation are essential 
for many product exports.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested