devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Convert pdf to jpg file application software utility azure windows web page visual studio EKM_ContentMgt_WP0-part638

UGS Teamcenter
www.ugs.com/teamcenter
PLM-Driven Content Management
Aligning engineering design and technical publications
support functions: Ensuring product launch success
By using product lifecycle management (PLM) to integrate today’s engineering design
and technical publications domains, companies can dramatically improve the way in
which content is managed across a product document’s lifecycle. With this in mind, 
UGS PLM Software provides UGS Teamcenter™ software’s content management solution
toenable engineering design and technical publication groups to share information
retained in different system repositories, re-use content as often as possible and
automate functions and processes common to both domains.
white paper
UGSPLMSoftware
Convert pdf to jpg file - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert online pdf to jpg; pdf to jpeg
Convert pdf to jpg file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
.pdf to jpg; convert pdf pages to jpg
Section name
Table of contents
Executive summary
1
Recent evolution of 
technical publications
2
Commonality between product 
and documentation lifecycles
4
Today’s next major 
improvement opportunities
7
Moving ahead
10
Appendix
11
PLM-Driven Content Management
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the
change pdf file to jpg file; reader convert pdf to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf to high quality jpg; bulk pdf to jpg
1
Section name
The implementation of structured authoring initiatives and other
technology advances has significantly improved the lifecycle
associated with managing today’s product and service documents –
especially with respect to reducing production time and managing
resources effectively. However, additional progress can be made by
recognizing the intersecting relationships between engineering and
technical publishing and capitalizing on their synergy to improve
multiple business processes, including:
• Content authoring
• Content editing/updating
• Document publishing
• Graphics management
• Document translation
To gain these additional improvements, many of today’s most
innovative companies are using product lifecycle management (PLM)
to integrate their engineering design and technical publications
domains at multiple levels by:
• Sharing information retained in multiple systems
• Re-using product and service content
• Automating functions and processes common to both domains
UGS Teamcenter™ software provides a PLM-driven environment that
streamlines today’s technical publications processes through dynamic
publishing techniques. These streamlined publication processes
enable technical documents to be developed in concert with the
product development process.
Teamcenter®content management capabilities address issues
associated withtraditional technical publications processes, including
concerns that these processes:
• Take too much time
• Have difficulty reflecting the latest engineering changes
• Inhibit extensive re-use of content and graphics
• Require “heroic” efforts to meet product delivery dates
• Fail to meet multiple language requirements
• Fail to publish timely content in all of today’s required delivery
formats
Many of these issues result from the fact that the content for
engineering design and technical publications traditionally has
resided in disparate and discrete authoring systems and
organizational domains. Teamcenter’s content management
solutions overcome this isolation by providing workflow, version
control and relationship management capabilities that link product
documents with their associated parts in an assembly.
PLM-driven content management directly relates XML content
instances to a product’s parts – thereby synchronizing the product
and its documentation even when product changes arise. The
relationships between product parts and content ensure that critical
path documents that depend on engineering data flow will be
completed without imposing unnecessary overhead (typically
required when engineering and technical publication teams work
with different systems in isolated environments).
In a PLM environment, the product definition is managed in one
location – a logical repository that serves as the environment’s
authoritative information source regardless of configuration or
whether manufacturing or as-sold BOMs are being referenced.
Teamcenter-driven PLM environments provide a single logical
authoritative source of product definitions and linked documents 
that can be manipulated byuser-initiated workflow and data
management capabilities tointegrate engineering, manufacturing
and technical publications.
Keys for Success
Companies can eliminate the isolation that separates technical
publications groups from their engineering design/development
counterparts byeffectively using XML in both environments.
To facilitate effective collaboration, the technical publication group’s
system of choice and engineering design group’s system of choice
must use the same workflows and process automation environment.
Moving XML into an engineering environment – through the use of
PLM-driven content management – is crucial to integrating the
processes and information flows common to both environments,
while at the same time delivering improved productivity and cost
savings.
Executive summary
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; convert pdf photo to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc. PowerPoint.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
change pdf file to jpg; .pdf to jpg converter online
Recent evolution of technical publications
2
Over the last two decades, engineering design and manufacturing have
experienced sweeping technology changes. Working relationships
between these two organizational domains have been integrated through
the use of interdisciplinary engineering software that recognizes and
capitalizes on intersecting roles that each domain plays in the product
lifecycle.
Product lifecycle management (PLM) has driven these initiatives by
providing these domains with a common platform for effectively
integrating otherwise isolated information assets and streamlining cross-
discipline tasks across the enterprise. This integration has enabled
companies to accelerate their product development cycles, improve
product assembly, and target their product designs to highly selective
market segments. Equally important, these changes have increased the
need for more product support documentation while raising its level of
complexity. 
Role of technical publications
The need to support more complex product documentation has raised
new challenges for today’s technical publication groups, including the
need to: 
• Develop content to support a variety of documentation deliverables,
including traditional hardcopy manuals, CD-based publications and
online documents in both page-based and interactive formats
• Simultaneously publish documents in multiple languages to support
today’s global marketplace
• Release product and service documentation on time (i.e., when the
product is ready to ship) while accommodating distributed teams that
need access to current versions of the same content
• Accurately reflect late breaking engineering changes in the document’s
content, even when these changes occur within days of the product
ship date
Levelofeffort
Lifecycle phase
Design
Prototype
Test
Modify
Test
Release
Ship
Engineering
Technical publications
Traditional relationships between engineering design and technical publications in the product lifecycle
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C# Create PDF from Raster Images, .NET Graphics and REImage File with XDoc Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg file
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Turn multipage PDF file into image files in .NET WinForm application. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET.
convert pdf picture to jpg; convert multi page pdf to jpg
3
• Avoid “heroic” publication production efforts that incur overtime costs,
whichin turn jeopardize the product’sprofit margins
The accompanying diagram illustrates the traditional relationship between
engineering design and technical publications during the product lifecycle.
Facing the “last hurdle”
Historically,technical publications groups have been viewed as the “last
hurdle” in product development innovation (see appendix for more
details). While publication services and deliverables remain on the critical
pathtoproduct shipping, engineering design decisions and engineering
change orders (ECOs) are still managed outside the technical publications’
system and its related workflow.
To reduce the time lag between product release and the document ship
date, most publication groups start document development early in the
product design cycle. As a result, technical publication groups engage in
significant rework as the product design is repeatedly refined. 
In essence, technical publication is still largelyafollow-on process. While
providing a necessaryfunction, technical publications groups are largely
isolated from other disciplines in the product lifecycle. They invariably use
separate automation systems and often rely on non-integrated processes
to handle change notices that materialize late in the product lifecycle.
However, diverse development paths no longer offer sufficient
justification for keeping engineering design and technical publications in
separate computing environments. Today’s common change management
processes and the configuration management capabilities of PLM now
provide companies with a holistic environment for managing both product
and documentation development. This holistic environment is especially
adept at reducing the risk of inconsistent or out-of-date technical
documentation while shortening the length and complexity of the
publications cycle.
Levelofeffort
Lifecycle phase
Design
Prototype
Test
Modify
Test
Release
Ship
Engineering
Technical publications
Influence of structured content on the relationship between technical publishing and engineering design
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. C#.NET WPF PDF Viewer Tool: Convert and Export PDF.
convert pdf to jpg file; change from pdf to jpg
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List foreach (string file in imagePaths) { Bitmap tmpBmp = new Bitmap
convert pdf file into jpg format; conversion of pdf to jpg
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter n
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section n
Component 1
Component 2
Component 3
Component n
Text 
block A
Table
Text 
block B
Table
Image
Commonality between product and documentation lifecycles
4
During the past two decades, significant technology improvements have
enabled multiple disciplines in the product lifecycle to work together more
effectively. Engineering data management and standards for metadata
management have improved communications between engineering teams
and shortened the engineering production cycle. Content technologies
and their related standards have enabled publication groups to quickly
and consistently produce higher volumes of technical documents – as well
as facilitate content exchange with business partners and government
oversight groups without the need for rework.
Acloselook at the publishing process and documentation lifecycle reveals
similarities and dependencies with today’s engineering processes and the
product lifecycle. Technical publication groups have direct ties to the
engineering design discipline in at least three ways:
• Source material
• Parts data and its related descriptive content
• Technical review/feedback process
Functional system requirements
Technical writers deal with the same complex parts and assembly
constructs as their engineering counterparts. A series of related technical
publications is comprised of reusable “parts” (e.g., content and graphics)
that can be assembled into documents, such as training materials,
illustrated parts catalogs and operation manuals. By looking closely at
these manuals, it is easy to see common graphics, operational procedures,
and descriptive paragraphs.
Graphics often are used in the product’s support documents as well as in
documents that describe the product’s related configurations. For
example, the steps and graphics that describe a carburetor’s maintenance
procedure might also appear in the owner’s manual for a particular model
of coupe or sedan offered by the same automaker. To support these
models, an engineer must be able to track the assemblies where the
carburetor is used, while a technical writer must be able to track all
documents where the carburetor is described.
Typical parts and assemblies for a technical document
Edit/
revise
Copies of
source data
Engineering
data
ECO
Final
documents
Draft
documents
Create/
edit
Technical publishing
Engineering
PDF or paper copies 
for review/approval – 
ECO added as comments
Expanding on this example, the coupe owner’s manual might include a
cover photo of the coupe, while the sedan’s owner’s manual might
include a photo of the sedan. Each manual’s text content will be different
depending of whether the automobile in question is a two-door or four-
door model. This configuration-sensitive content has metadata that
classifies the content as being appropriate for a specific document. In
essence, this metadata is applied to the content’s “parts” to indicate when
it should be added tothe document’s“assembly” (in much the same way
that a physical product’s parts and assemblies are managed in an
engineering-driven PDM environment).
Both the engineering and technical publications environments use
repository software to meet the product’s state and lifecycle
tracking/reporting requirements. Both environments need to manage
access rights. Both need to track contributor changes to the parts and
assemblies that they manage. Both need to manage risk and facilitate IT
efficiency by reducing redundant or duplicate parts and providing a
consistent product view.
In addition, both environments require the following key functionalities:
• Workflow/lifecycle management
• Change management
• Security controls, including International Traffic in Arms Regulations
and Export Control (ITAR)
• Program execution management
• Configuration management
• Relationship management
In the bestcase, companies have traditionally provided these
functionalities totheir engineering design and technical publications
groups through multiple repository applications – and in worst case,
through directory structures and generic tracking mechanisms that are
manuallymaintained.
Source material
Output from logistics, mechanical and software engineering groups
usually provide the source materials used by technical writers to create
document content. In most cases, source material is “thrown over the
wall” to the technical publications group so it can be reworked. Draft
documents are created in the technical publications environment, where
source materials can be revised, rewritten or copied/pasted into complete
5
Typical product information flow between engineering and technical publications groups
6
documents. Subsequently, these drafts are thrown back over the wall for
technical review by the engineering group.
Concurrently – and in many cases, unbeknownst to the technical
publications group – design changes take place in the engineering
environment. These changes are provided to technical publications in the
form of new/revised content or ECO copies. In turn, the technical writing
team updates the in-process documentation accordingly.
Relationship between data and content
There is a direct relationship between a product’s parts/assemblies and the
text/graphics that describe it within a technical document. This
relationship is so close and complete that many publications group use
part numbers as the metadata for classifying their content.
The engineering design changes that affect mechanical, electrical and
software models/codes also drive the changes that are made against a
technical document’s content and graphics. In addition, while ECOs, their
related discussions and their authorizations/approvals are tracked in the
product engineering and development environment, technical
publications groups have a similar requirement to monitor/manage the
annotations and approvals associated with product’s documentation
content.
Technical review/feedback
Usually, the responsibility for validating/verifying the content of a
technical document falls to the engineering staff. To handle the
review/feedback functions associated with the validation/verification
process, engineering groups generally work with page-based displays or
hard copy documents.
Engineers sometimes review multiple configurations of the same
document content in the same way they review designs that relate to
multiple product configurations.
7
Today’s next major improvement opportunities
Technology advances and the implementation of structured authoring
have facilitated significant production time and resource management
improvements with respect to creating technical document content.
Additional progress can be made by capitalizing on the common
relationship between engineering design and technical publications.
Specifically, the engineering design and technical publication groups can
be effectively integrated by:
• Sharing information retained in multiple systems
• Re-using product and service content
• Automating functions and processes common to both disciplines
Shared systems
Both the engineering design environment and the technical publications
environment have similar requirements for managing information in a
sharable repository. In addition, engineering changes to the product
design act as prompts for the technical publication group to initiate
content changes against the product’s related documentation.
Today’s most innovative companies recognize that the publication process
makes considerable contributions (in the form of both design and after-
market documents) to the product lifecycle. Equally important, they
realize that the “parts” and metadata that comprise these documents are
directly related to the product’s traditionally defined parts.
Many companies are making the move to consolidate and reduce the
hardware, software and legacy customizations that account for a large
portion of their overhead spend.
1
By moving all of their product dataintoasingle PLM environment and
enabling entitled usersfrom all disciplines towork with the same system,
companies can reduce the number of systems they employ and cut their
relatedoverhead.
Similarly, a single PLM system improves cross-discipline communications
while providing an integrated product definition that all product support
teams can use to understand the impact of approved design changes.
Equallyimportant, take-to-market risk is reduced and time-to-market
schedules areimproved as companies no longer need to depend on
isolated information silos, manually-maintained tracking mechanisms or
individual knowledge workers who may leave a company’s workforce
vulnerable totheir retirement.
Content re-use
By combining the shared information capabilities required by both
engineering and technical publications, today’s companies are positioned
to move closer to a true solution for re-using their product-related
intellectual assets.
Manufacturing companies typically value part-centric information.
Information is developed as the part passes from conception through
refinement and testing, deployment, maintenance and obsolescence. 
As this happens, that information is incorporated into technical
documentation. In theory, any information regarding a part should have a
relationship to the part. In practice, engineering and publication teams
copy/paste and rewrite that information several times over during the life
of the part.
For example, suppose Ed from Engineering has come up with the concept
for an improved widget. Typically, he writes up a proposal that includes
the rationale and requirements for a new assembly. Then, he gets
approval to proceed. Given the nature of this process, Ed’s company has
text and product requirements that describe the assembly before Ed even
begins the details of the design. Companies often store and manage this
early information in a requirements management database (or lacking
that, they might retain this information in an emacs or MS Word or Excel
file). 
At this point, Ed might begin the design by creating, combining or
copying/pasting numerous versions of numerous CAD files. The design
nowhas expanded toinclude parts that are contained or used by the
assembly. For example, a larger engine component might contain or use
Ed’snewassembly.In addition, relationships between CAD/CAE files that
supportthe manufacturing of the new part also can be created.
Atthis point, Larryfrom Logistics joins the product development process
by creating maintenance, repair and operations information for the
widget. This logistics support analysis record (LSAR) data, which is stored
in yet another database, includes requirements and information about
other factors, such as mean-time-between-failure (MTBF) and data used
internally by the service organization. At the same time, Larry also writes
instructional maintenance procedures that include each procedure’s
related steps. In essence, Larry’s work describes or supports the part. The
company maintains the relationship between Ed’s work and Larry’s work
1
According to the Gartner Group, consolidating as few as six small servers into a pair of large
machines provides total cost of ownership savings of 35 to 40 percent (primarily achieved by
reducing internal support costs). Gartner Group Study K-LAN-308.
8
by using the same part number when referring to the information they
produce. As a best practice, this information should be stored in the same
system.
Now, Arthur from Technical Publications gets involved in the product
lifecycle. He is responsible for creating all of the consumer and services
documentation that needs to be shipped with Ed’s assembly. Arthur
requests access to all of the information that has been created to date 
by Ed and Larry, including engineering diagrams, the manufacturing 
BOM, and logistics information. At this point, Arthur might identify
documentation from previous projects that relates to the parts in the
assembly – and then start to work.
Typically, Arthur might copy/paste from other documents, rewrite content
as needed, reorient certain illustrations, and edit procedural steps to
accommodate both new users and experienced users. When this is 
done, he will save all of this work in the technical publication group’s
information repository. After this, Arthur might generate a draft PDF 
and submit it to Ed and Larry for their review/approval. In many cases,
Arthur will be informed that design changes have been made, which will
require revisions to his document. 
Before Arthur is done, he probably will have created several documen-
tation versions that describe or support the part. Moreover, some of these
versions might be a version of the work previously done by Ed and Larry.
Since traditional publications approaches do not link the documentation
to its source data, publications teams often add time, cost and even risk
(in the form of inaccurate or out-of-date content) to the process of
producing technical support documentation.
However, imagine how that workflow would change if engineering and
technical publication team members were working in the same
Teamcenter environment. Arthur would only need to change/edit content
that directly relates to new or change product information. A single PLM-
driven repository with today’s latest illustration software would enable
Arthur to identify – and in some cases, to programmatically produce –
new graphics whenever the engineering group updates the source
CAD/CAE files.
Equally important, Arthur would receive automatic notification about
which specific part or which logistics information is affected by the design
change. This notification capability is particularly valuable since it frees
technical writers from having to research the design change and
determine its impact manually. Instead, edits to the source data would be
retained between ECOs.
Publication structure
Published documents
Engineering 
information
Part
0194700
Version 3.0
Part
0194700
Version 3.0
Part
0194700
Version 3.0
Publication
010999
Header
010888
Manual
010888
Version 1.4
GenComp
010879
Version 2.0
GenComp
010877
Version 2.0
Composedcontent
Procedure
0109378
Version 2.2
Product
0109378
Version 3.7
CAD
Assembly
0194782
Version 3.0
Renditions
Annotations
Publishing results
Maintenance reqs
Common parts
Annotations
Graphic
0194782A
Version 3.0
GenComp
010879
Version 2.0
Document
10112345-2
010999
Version 2.1
Relationship of engineering information and publication structure to published document
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested