Projected  
Costs of  
Generating  
Electricity
2015 Edition
Executive Summary
Convert .pdf to .jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
bulk pdf to jpg converter online; best convert pdf to jpg
Convert .pdf to .jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf document to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
change pdf to jpg format; change format from pdf to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF files to JPG.
convert pdf to jpg for online; batch pdf to jpg online
Projected Costs of  
Generating Electricity
2015 Edition
INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY 
NUCLEAR ENERGY AGENCY 
ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
convert from pdf to jpg; .net pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
change from pdf to jpg on; convert pdf to jpeg on
Copyright © 2015
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/International Energy Agency 
9, rue de la Fédération, 75739 Paris Cedex 15, France
and
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency 
12, boulevard des Îles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France
Please note that this publication is subject to specific restrictions that limit its use and distribution.  
The terms and conditions are available online at www.iea.org/t&c/
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf page to jpg; changing pdf to jpg on
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
reader pdf to jpeg; convert multipage pdf to jpg
3
Executive summary 
Projected Costs of Generating Electricity – 2015 Edition is the eighth report in the series on the levelised 
costs of generating electricity. This report presents the results of work performed in 2014 and early 
2015 to calculate the cost of generating electricity for both baseload electricity generated from 
fossil fuel thermal and nuclear power stations, and a range of renewable generation, including 
variable sources such as wind and solar. It is a forward-looking study, based on the expected cost of 
commissioning these plants in 2020. 
The LCOE calculations are based on a levelised average lifetime cost approach, using the 
discounted cash flow (DCF) method. The calculations use a combination of generic, country-specific 
and technology-specific assumptions for the various technical and economic parameters, as agreed 
by the Expert Group on Projected Costs of Generating Electricity (EGC Expert Group). For the first 
time, the analysis was performed using three discount rates (3%, 7% and 10%).1
Costs are calculated at the plant level (busbar), and therefore do not include transmission 
and distribution costs. Similarly, the LCOE calculation does not capture other systemic costs or 
externalities beyond CO
2
emissions.2
The analysis within this report is based on data for 181 plants in 22 countries (including 
3non-OECD countries3). This total includes 17 natural gas-fired generators (13combined-cycle gas 
turbines[CCGTs] and 4 open-cycle gas turbines [OCGTs]), 14 coal plants,4 11nuclear power plants, 
38solar photovoltaic (PV) plants (12 residential scale, 14 commercial scale, and 12large, ground-
mounted) and 4 solar thermal (CSP) plants, 21 onshore wind plants, 12offshore wind plants, 28hydro 
plants, 6geothermal, 11 biomass and biogas plants and 19combined heat and power (CHP) plants of 
varying types. This data set contains a marked shift in favour of renewables compared to the prior 
reports, indicating an increased interest in low-carbon technologies on the part of the participating 
governments.
Part II of the study contains statistical analysis of the underlying data (including a focused 
analysis on the cost of renewables) and a sensitivity analysis. Part III contains discussions of 
“boundary issues” that do not necessarily enter into the calculation of LCOEs, but have an impact 
on decision making in the electricity sector. The chapter on financing focuses on issues affecting 
the cost of capital, a key topic given the trends noted above. The chapter on emerging generating 
technologies provides a glimpse of what the next study may include, as these emerging technologies 
are commercialised. The final two chapters present cost issues from a system perspective and cost 
metrics that may, in addition to LCOE, provide deeper insight into the true cost of technologies in 
liberalised markets with high penetrations of variable renewable power.
1. See Chapter 2 on “Methodology, conventions and key assumptions” for further details on questions of methodology and 
Chapter 8 on “Financing issues” for a discussion of discount rates. To aid in comparability with prior studies, results for a 
discount rate of 5% are presented in Chapter 5, “History of Projected Costs of Generating Electricity, 1981-2015”.
2. The report does not attempt to calculate the impact of CO
2
emissions or non-monetarised externalities associated with 
fossil-fired plants (e.g. in their fuel production) or with nuclear power plants (e.g. in their fuel cycles).
3. Brazil, China and South Africa.
4. Contrary to the 2010 study, plants with carbon capture and storage (CCS) were excluded from this analysis.
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
convert pdf pages to jpg online; convert pdf to jpeg
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. Copyright © <2000-2015> by <RasterEdge.com>. All Rights Reserved.
bulk pdf to jpg converter; changing pdf to jpg file
4
Results
Figure ES.1 shows the range of LCOE results for the three baseload technologies analysed in this 
report (natural gas-fired CCGTs, coal and nuclear). At a 3% discount rate, nuclear is the lowest cost 
option for all countries. However, consistent with the fact that nuclear technologies are capital 
intensive relative to natural gas or coal, the cost of nuclear rises relatively quickly as the discount 
rate is raised. As a result, at a 7%discount rate the median value of nuclear is close to the median 
value for coal, and at a 10% discount rate the median value for nuclear is higher than that of either 
CCGTs or coal. These results include a carbon cost of USD 30/tonne, as well as regional variations in 
assumed fuel costs.
Figure ES.1: LCOE ranges for baseload technologies 
(at each discount rate)
LCOE (USD/MWh)
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
Nuclear
Coal
CCGT
Nuclear
Coal
CCGT
Nuclear
Coal
CCGT
Median
3%
7%
10%
, and therefore obscure regional variations. For a 
more granular analysis, see Chapter 3 on “Technology overview”.
Figure ES.2 shows the LCOE ranges for various renewable technologies – namely, the three 
categories of solar PV in the study (residential, commercial and large, ground-mounted) and the two 
categories of wind (onshore and offshore). It is immediately apparent that the ranges in costs are 
significantly larger than for baseload technologies. It is also notable that the costs across technologies 
are relatively in line with one another. While at the high end, the LCOE for renewable technologies 
remains well above those of baseload technologies, at the low-end costs are in line with – or even 
below – baseload technologies.
previous study, though onshore wind remains the lowest cost renewable technology. The median 
values for these technologies are, for the most part, closer to the low end of the range, a reflection 
of the fact that this chart obscures significant regional variations in costs (in particular for solar PV). 
This is not surprising, because the cost of renewable technologies is determined in large part by local 
resource availability, which can vary significantly among countries or even within countries.
5
Figure ES.2: LCOE ranges for solar PV and wind technologies 
(at each discount rate)
LCOE (USD/MWh)
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
Median
3%
7%
10%
Oshore wind
Onshore wind
Large, ground-mounted PV
Commercial PV
Residential PV
Oshore wind
Onshore wind
Large, ground-mounted PV
Commercial PV
Residential PV
Oshore wind
Onshore wind
Large, ground-mounted PV
Commercial PV
Residential PV
, and therefore obscure regional variations. For a 
more granular analysis, see Chapter 3 on “Technology overview”. Based on IEA analysis and commentary from the EGC Expert 
Group, an alternative measure to median value was also included in this study, namely the generation weighted average cost. 
For more on that topic, see Chapter 6 on “Statistical analysis of key technologies”.
To better interpret the results, it is important to bear in mind several relevant issues. First, as already 
noted, there is significant variation among countries both in terms of the technologies presented and 
the reported costs. While the IEA and NEA Secretariats, with the support of the EGC Expert Group, 
have worked to make the data as comparable as possible (by using consistent assumptions when 
possible, and by verifying the underlying data both with the participating countries as well as with 
other reliable sources), variations in cost are to be expected even in the case of technologies that 
are considered standardised. Local cost conditions are highly dependent on, for example, resource 
availability, labour costs and local regulations. 
Further, even with highly accurate cost data, some assumptions will also have a degree of 
uncertainty. Future fuel costs, for example, may be significantly different from the costs assumed in 
this report. In fact, as the report was being finalised, commodity prices such as oil and natural gas 
declined significantly. These uncertainties cannot fully be captured in the core analysis of the report, 
though they are addressed to some extent in Chapter 7 on the “Sensitivity analysis”. With that in 
mind, the results of the Projected Costs of Generating Electricity study (“EGC study”) can be reviewed in 
more detail.
Baseload technologies
Overnight costs for natural gas-fired CCGTs in OECD countries range from USD 845/kWe (Korea) to 
USD 1289/kWe (New Zealand). In LCOE terms, costs at a 3%discount rate range from a low of USD61/
MWh in the United States to USD133/MWh in Japan. The United States has the lowest cost CCGT in 
LCOE terms, despite having a relatively high capital cost, which demonstrates the significant impact 
that variations in fuel price can have on the final cost. At a 7% discount rate, LCOEs range from 
USD66/MWh (United States) to USD138/MWh (Japan), and at a 10% discount rate they range from 
USD71/MWh (United States) to USD143/MWh (Japan). 
6
Overnight costs for coal plants in OECD countries range from a low of USD1218/kWe in Korea to 
a high of USD3067/kWe in Portugal. In OECD countries, LCOEs at a 3% discount rate range from a low 
of USD66/MWh in Germany to a high of USD95/MWh in Japan. At a 7% discount rate, LCOEs range 
from USD76/MWh (Germany) to USD107/MWh (Japan), and at a 10% discount rate they range from 
USD83/MWh (Germany) to USD119/MWh (Japan).
The range of overnight costs for nuclear technologies in OECD countries is large, from a low 
of USD2021/kWe in Korea to a high of USD6215/kWe in Hungary. LCOEs at a 3% discount rate 
range from USD29/MWh in Korea to USD64/MWh in the United Kingdom, USD40/MWh (Korea) to 
USD101/MWh (United Kingdom) at a 7% discount rate and USD51/MWh (Korea) to USD136/MWh 
(United Kingdom) at 10%.
Solar PV and wind technologies
Solar PV technologies are divided into three categories: residential, commercial, and large, ground-
mounted. Overnight costs for residential PV range from USD1867/kWe in Portugal to USD3366/
kWe in France.
5
LCOEs at a 3% discount rate range from USD96/MWh in Portugal to USD218/MWh in 
Japan. At a 7% discount rate, LCOEs range from USD132/MWh in Portugal to USD293/MWh in France. 
At a 10% discount rate, they range from USD162/MWh to USD374/MWh, in Portugal for both cases.
For commercial PV, overnight costs range from USD1029/kWe in Austria to USD1977/kWe in 
Denmark. LCOEs range from USD69/MWh in Austria to USD142/MWh in Belgium at a 3% discount 
rate, USD98/MWh (Austria) to USD190/MWh (Belgium) at a 7% discount rate and USD121/MWh 
(Portugal) to USD230/MWh (Belgium) at a 10% discount rate.
Overnight costs for large, ground-mounted PV range from USD1200/kWe in Germany to 
USD2563/kWe in Japan. LCOEs at a 3% discount rate range from USD54/MWh in the United States to 
USD181/MWh in Japan, USD80/MWh (United States) to USD239/MWh (Japan) at a 7% discount rate 
and USD103/MWh (United States) to USD290/MWh (Japan) at a 10% discount rate. 
Onshore wind plant overnight costs range from USD1571/kWe in the United States to USD2999/
kWe in Japan. At a 3% discount rate, LCOEs range from USD33/MWh in the United States to USD135/
MWh in Japan, USD43/MWh (United States) to USD182/MWh (Japan) at a 7% discount rate and 
USD52/MWh (United States) to USD223/MWh at a 10% rate (Japan). 
Finally, overnight costs for offshore wind plants range from USD3703/kWe in the United Kingdom 
to USD5933/kWe in Germany. LCOEs at a 3% discount rate range from USD98/MWh in Denmark to 
USD214/MWh in Korea; at a 7% discount rate, they range from USD136/MWh (Denmark) to USD275/
MWh (Korea); and at a 10% discount rate, they range from USD167/MWh (United States) to USD327/
MWh (Korea).
Results from non-OECD countries
The study also includes data from three non-OECD countries: Brazil (hydro only), the People’s Republic 
of China and South Africa. In the particular case of China, data was derived from a combination 
of publicly available sources and survey data – in particular, the IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems 
Programme (PVPS) survey. They cannot, therefore, be considered official data from China for the 
Projected Costs of Generating Electricity study. Nevertheless, it is important to consider the possible 
costs of generation in China as part of this study. 
The estimated overnight cost for a CCGT in China (the only non-OECD data point in the sample) 
is USD627/kWe, while the LCOE is USD90/MWh, USD93/MWh and USD95/MWh at 3%, 7%, and 10% 
discount rates respectively. For coal, cost estimates are included for China, with an overnight cost 
of USD813/kWe, and South Africa, with an overnight cost of USD2222/kWe. The LCOEs for China 
are USD74/MWh at a 3% discount rate, USD78/MWh at a 7% discount rate and USD82/MWh at a 
5. Costs in France, for residential rooftop, include additional costs specific to roof-integrated solar systems.
7
10% discount rate. For South Africa, the range is larger: USD65/MWh at 3%, USD82/MWh at 7% and 
USD100/MWh at 10%. The report includes two nuclear data points for China, with overnight costs of 
USD1807/kWe and USD2615/kWe; LCOES are USD26/MWh and USD31/MWh at a 3% discount rate, 
For solar PV, China has the lowest cost commercial PV plant in the database, with an overnight 
cost of USD728/kWe; LCOEs are USD59/MWh, USD78/MWh and USD96/MWh at 3%, 7% and 
10% discount rates respectively. The overnight cost for the large, ground-mounted PV plant is  
USD937/kWe; the LCOEs are USD55/MWh, USD73/MWh and USD88/MWh at 3%, 7% and 10% 
discount rates. Finally, for onshore wind, overnight costs for the two estimates from China are 
USD1200/kWe and USD1400/kWe. While in South Africa, the single onshore wind plant in the 
database is USD2756/kWe; LCOEs are USD77/MWh, USD102/MWh and USD123/MWh at 3%, 7% and 
10% respectively.
Details on other technologies included in the report, such as OCGTs, solar thermal, hydro, 
biomass/biogas and CHPs can be found in Chapters 3and 4.
Comparison with EGC 2010
While changes in assumptions and differences both in terms of size and composition of the 
underlying dataset make cross-study comparisons difficult, it is nevertheless useful to examine, 
at a high-level, how cost estimates have changed over time.6 Figure ES.3 compares the range of 
LCOE results for baseload technologies in the most recent 2010 edition of Projected Costs of Generating 
Electricity (EGC 2010) and in the current study. 
The EGC 2010 results show a wider range of LCOEs, in particular for coal-fired generation. This is in 
part due to the fact that EGC 2010 contained a greater number of data points for each technology than 
there are in EGC2015,7 but also because of changes in fuel price and other underlying assumptions. 
While the range of LCOE values is smaller in EGC2015, it is notable that the median value for each 
technology is higher than in EGC 2010. While the median value is an imprecise measurement for 
comparing costs between technology categories and across countries, the fact that the median value 
is higher in each case does suggest the possibility of increasing costs for each of these technologies 
on an LCOE basis.
F
(at 10% discount rate)
LCOE (USD/MWh)
Median
CCGT
Coal
Nuclear
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
EGC 2015
EGC 2010
EGC 2015
EGC 2010
EGC 2015
EGC 2010
6. For a more detailed examination of the history of the Projected Costs of Generating Electricity study, see Chapter 5.
7. EGC 2010 contained 23 CCGTs (without CCS), 31 coal-fired plants (without CCS), and 20 nuclear power plants, compared 
to 13 CCGTs, 14 coal-fired plants and 11 nuclear plants in EGC2015.
EGC 2010 results have been converted to USD 2013 values for comparison.
8
For renewable technologies (specifically, solar PV and onshore wind), the change relative to 
EGC2010 is in the opposite direction. This can be seen most clearly in the LCOE values for solar 
PV, where, despite a larger number of data points in EGC2015,8 there are both a smaller range of 
LCOE values and a very significant decline in costs. Onshore wind LCOEs are also noticeably lower in 
EGC2015, though the difference is much less pronounced.9
F
(at 10% discount rate)
LCOE (USD/MWh)
Median
Solar PV
(all technologies)
Onshore wind
0
200
400
600
800
1 000
1 200
EGC 2015
EGC 2010
EGC 2015
EGC 2010
EGC 2010 results have been converted to USD 2013 values for comparison.
Conclusions
This eighth edition of Projected Costs of Generating Electricity focuses on the cost of generation for a 
limited set of countries, and even within these countries only for a subset of technologies. Caution 
must therefore be taken when attempting to derive broad lessons from the analysis. Nevertheless, 
some conclusions can be drawn. 
First, the vast majority of the technologies included in this study are low- or zero-carbon sources, 
suggesting a clear shift in the interest of participating countries away from fossil-based technologies, 
at least as compared to the 2010 study.
Second, while the 2010 study noted a significant increase in the cost of baseload technologies, the 
data in this report suggest that any such cost inflation has been arrested. This is particularly notable in 
the case of nuclear technologies, which have costs that are roughly on a par with those reported in the 
prior study, thus undermining the growing narrative that nuclear costs continue to increase globally.
Finally, this report clearly demonstrates that the cost of renewable technologies – in particular 
solar photovoltaic – have declined significantly over the past five years, and that these technologies 
are no longer cost outliers.
Despite the general relevance of these conclusions, the cost drivers of the different generating 
technologies nonetheless remain both market- and technology-specific. As such, there is no single 
technology that can be said to be the cheapest under all circumstances. As this edition of the study 
makes clear, system costs, market structure, policy environment and resource endowment all 
continue to play an important role in determining the final levelised cost of any given investment.
8. EGC 2010 contained 17 solar PV technologies, compared to 38 in EGC2015.
9. The median value presented in these figures may not fully represent renewable energy costs, as it gives equal weight to 
markets or data points which may be less relevant globally. For a more detailed discussion on the cost of renewable energy – 
and, in particular an altert.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested