telerik pdf viewer mvc : Convert pdf to gif or jpg Library application component .net html wpf mvc Enterprise-Development-with-Flex8-part770

To finalize Café Townsend, we’ll steal (copy) the assets folder from the original Café
to display the logo on top, apply the styles defined in main.css, and make just a couple
of cosmetic changes:
• Remove the 
Application
tag from Example 1-26, moving the declaration of name-
spaces and the 
creationComplete()
event to its MXML tag 
ViewStack
(you’ll also
need to remove three references to the autogenerated variable 
vs
that was referring
to this 
ViewStack
):
<mx:ViewStack height="100%" width="100%"
xmlns:mx="http://www.adobe.com/2006/mxml"
xmlns:lib="http://www.faratasystems.com/2008/components"
creationComplete="onCreationComplete()">
• Create a small application Café_Townsend_CDB to include the styles, the logo,
and the main view (see Example 1-28).
Example 1-28. Café_Townsend_CDB.mxml
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" standalone="no"?>
backgroundColor="#000000" layout="vertical">
<mx:Style source="assets/main.css"/>
<mx:Image source="assets/header.jpg" width="700"/>
<views:Employee_getEmployees_GridFormTest selectedIndex="0"/>
</mx:Application>
Compile and run the application, just to ensure that Café Townsend CDB looks as
good as possible (Figure 1-21).
The entire process of creating Café Townsend with Clear Data Builder has been pre-
recorded, and you can find this screencast in the Demos section at http://www.farata
systems.com.
Report Card: Clear Toolkit
Clear Toolkit is a collection of code generators, methodologies, and smart components.
Its components may be used either as an alternative to architectural frameworks or
together with them. If you are a development manager starting a Flex project with a
team that has at least one senior Flex architect, using Clear Toolkit is the productive
way to go.
If you have to deal with a number of junior developers, consider using the Mate frame-
work with some of the Clear Toolkit components, e.g., enhanced 
DataGrid
DataForm
,
and a number of enhanced UI controls. Besides, having a good reporter, logger, Ant
script, and DTO generators is quite handy regardless of whether you use architectural
frameworks.
Clear Toolkit t | | 57
Convert pdf to gif or jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
to jpeg; convert pdf image to jpg image
Convert pdf to gif or jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
pdf to jpeg; convert pdf picture to jpg
The pros are:
• It offers a library of enriched Flex components (supergrid, data-aware components,
etc.).
• It automatically generates code, which minimizes the amount of code to be written
by application developers.
• It offers data synchronization functionality in free BlazeDS, similar to Data Man-
agement Services from LCDS.
• Its components can be used à la carte on an as-needed basis.
• It automates creation of Ant build scripts.
• It automates creation of ActionScript data transfer objects.
The cons are:
• It doesn’t help in separating work among team members.
• Data exchange between the application’s views and modules must be coded
manually.
Figure 1-21. Café Townsend, as generated by Clear Data Builder
58 | | Chapter 1: Comparing Selected Flex Frameworks
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Convert a JPG to PDF. the files, try out some settings and then create the PDF files with we believe in diversity and won't discriminate against gif, bmp, png
convert pdf to jpg batch; changing pdf to jpg file
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
convert multi page pdf to jpg; convert from pdf to jpg
Final Framework Selection Considerations
If you are a Flex architect or a development manager in charge of selecting a third-party
Flex framework, ask yourself these questions: “Do I want to use intelligent objects that
encapsulate most of the framework functionality, or do I prefer to deal with simple
objects and do explicit coding for each instance? Will I have senior developers in the
project team? Do I need to modularize the application to be developed? Do I trust code
generators?”
After answering these questions, take a detailed look at the implementation of several
frameworks, assess the benefits each of them brings to your application, and pick the
most appealing one that will give you confidence that it—given the project’s size/na-
ture/deliverables/available human resources—has the least probability of failing.
Always keep in mind that your application may grow and you’ll need to redesign it into
modules. Will your selected framework become your friend or foe in a modularized
application? In general, if you are going with modules, you need a multilayered frame-
work and intelligent registration services that are written specifically for the task.
Cairngorm, Mate, and PureMVC are architectural frameworks that utilize global ob-
jects. These may simplify project management by providing a structure and separating
developers’ work on the Model, View, and Controller. All these singletons, managers,
and event maps are a way to establish communication between the application parts.
By making this process more formal, you can build much smaller chunks, communi-
cating with each other, and in your mind the more formal process will yield better
maintainability. On the other hand, it will create more parts in your application that
require maintenance and testing.
Clear Toolkit is an application framework that consists of a mix of enhanced compo-
nents and code generators. Its goal is to make the development process more productive
by substantially reducing the need to write code manually.
If the word global gives you goosebumps, but you are uncomfortable with code gen-
erators too, consider Joe Berkovitz’s MVCS approach (see “References” on page 61)
as a middle ground between the two. This may work better for medium to large teams
that would have no access to code generators and data-driven/factories-based
architecture.
This book targets enterprise developers whose main concern is data processing. But
there are legions of Flex developers who do not care about 
DataGrid
and the like. They
are into the creation of small visual components and do not need to use any application
frameworks. For example, if you Google image viewer Cairngorm, you’ll find an ex-
ample of a small application to display images built with this framework. This is clearly
overkill and an example of bad practice, because if you are the only developer working
on a small one-view application, introducing any architectural framework is plain
wrong. For these kinds of applications, all you need is the Flex framework and possibly
one or two self-contained components.
Final Framework Selection Considerations s | | 59
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to gif images. // Define input and output files path.
convert online pdf to jpg; pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert MS PowerPoint to Jpeg, Png, Bmp
to Jpeg, PowerPoint to Png, PowerPoint to Bmp, and PowerPoint to Gif. RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code just convert first Excel page to Jpeg image.
change pdf to jpg image; convert pdf photo to jpg
Large projects are different animals. Six months into the project, the functional speci-
fication may change. This can happen for a variety of reasons, for example:
• The business analyst realizes that she made a mistake.
• The business process changes.
• Another department needs some of your application’s functionality.
• Another line of business has to be handled by your application.
If this happens, commands need to be amended and recoded, views redesigned, and
events integrated with a different workflow. Now you are thinking to yourself, “Why
didn’t I go with code generators that could’ve made my application more agile?”
Using code generators and components is a way to get you through the “implementa-
tion” part faster while giving you maximum flexibility on the “design and functionality”
part. If you don’t have 80 percent of your application built in 20 percent of the time,
you will be late with the remaining 20 percent.
Flex itself is more of an application framework. It is not a library of patterns, but rather
a set of objects that are built to communicate and react. The Flex framework itself uses
code generators. The key here is automation of implementation tasks by minimizing
the amount of manually written code. That is done by explicitly checking the “related”
objects for specific interfaces. By not adhering to the implementation of these interfaces,
the external frameworks require serious application development effort to support
them.
After rebuilding Café Townsend, we decided to compare the sizes of the pro-
duced .swf file. We’ve been using Flex Builder 3’s Project → Export Release Build option
with all default settings. These are the results:
Cairngorm
409 KB
Mate
368 KB
PureMVC
365 KB
The total size of the Café Townsend application produced by Clear Toolkit is 654 KB
on the client and 30 KB of Java JARs (Java ARchives) deployed on the server. The size
is larger, but this application includes full CRUD functionality; Cairngorm, Mate, and
PureMVC don’t. And you’ve had to write just a dozen lines of code manually. This is
a reasonable size for an application that has full CRUD functionality.
Of course, you can further reduce the size of the business portion of the Café written
with any of the frameworks by linking the Flex SDK as an RSL.
When making your selection, consider the benefits you’ll be getting from the frame-
work of your choice. From the learning curve perspective, none of the reviewed frame-
works is overly difficult to master. You may spend a day or two with the manuals. But
ask yourself, “What will be different in my project development if I use this particular
60 | | Chapter 1: Comparing Selected Flex Frameworks
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
best pdf to jpg converter for; .pdf to .jpg online
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from GIF Images on Windows. JPEG to GIF Converter can directly convert GIF files to JPG files.
convert pdf into jpg; convert pdf file to jpg format
framework?” Are you adding a small library to your project that helps you organize
your project better, but still requires you to write a lot of code? Or are you adding a
larger library that makes you write less code and be more productive?
Of course we are biased—we created Clear Toolkit to help us develop the types of
applications we work on with our business clients, and it serves us well. Before making
your final decision on a framework for your application (especially if it’s not as small
as Café Townsend), ask yourself one more question: “If three months down the road
I realize that I’ve selected the wrong framework, how much time/money would it take
to remove it?” The answer to this question may be crucial in the selection process.
If you decide to use one of the architectural frameworks, it doesn’t mean that you can’t
throw in a couple of useful components from Clear Toolkit or other libraries mentioned
in the following section. You can also find some brief reviews and recommendations
of third-party libraries and tools that will make your Flex ecosystem more productive.
References
Due to space constraints, we reviewed only some of the Flex frameworks in this chapter.
What other Flex MVC frameworks would we have reviewed if space allowed? We rec-
ommend you to take a close look at Swiz and Parsley, which are light MVC frameworks
that implement the Inversion of Control design pattern. Here is a comprehensive list
of Flex frameworks and component libraries, in alphabetical order:
• as3corelib
• Cairngen
• Cairngorm
• Cairngorm extensions
• Clear Toolkit
• EasyMVC
• Flextras
• FlexLib Components
• FlexMDI
• Guasax
• Mate
• MVCS
• Parsley
• PureMVC
• Spring ActionScript
• Swiz
• Tweener
References | | 61
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
control able to batch convert PDF documents to image formats in C#.NET. Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap
changing pdf to jpg on; change pdf to jpg file
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object. Use C# Code to Convert Gif to Tiff.
convert pdf to jpeg; .pdf to jpg
While analyzing frameworks, fill out the following questionnaire for each candidate:
• Will using this framework reduce the time required for development of my project?
• Does it offer enhanced Flex components or just help with separation of responsi-
bilities of developers?
• Is it well documented?
• Is it easy to master for developers that were assigned to this project?
• Is technical support available? If yes, is it provided by creators of this framework
or is it available via an online community?
• If I make the wrong choice, how long will it take to remove this framework from
the application code?
• Does it support modularized applications?
• How long has this framework been around? Has it been released or is it still in beta?
This chapter was a brief comparison of selected frameworks. If you’d like to get a better
understanding of how things work in Flex and maybe consider creating your own
framework of rich and reusable components, we encourage you to study Chapters 2,
3, and 6. The authors sincerely hope that after reading this book, you’ll be able to pick
the right Flex framework for your project!
62 | | Chapter 1: Comparing Selected Flex Frameworks
CHAPTER 2
Selected Design Patterns
Life is like an ever-shifting kaleidoscope—a slight
change, and all patterns alter.
—Sharon Salzberg
Design patterns suggest an approach to common problems that arise during software
development regardless of programming language. For example, when you need to
ensure that your application allows only one instance of a particular class, you need to
implement a singleton design pattern. If you need to pass the data between different
objects, you create data transfer objects (a.k.a. value objects). There are a number of
books written about design patterns and their implementation in different program-
ming languages, including ActionScript 3.0; see ActionScript 3.0 Design Patterns by
William Sanders and Chandima Cumaranatunge (O’Reilly). This chapter is not yet
another tutorial on patterns. The goal of this chapter is to highlight selected patterns,
as you (the developer) may implement them to take advantage of the Flex framework.
While going through the examples shown in this chapter, please keep in mind that Flex
is a domain-specific tool that’s aimed at creating rich UI for the Web and providing
efficient communication with the server-side systems.
We realize that there are people who don’t like using the dynamic features of Action-
Script, arguing that it makes the code less readable. In our opinion, there are lots of
cases when dynamic features of the language can make the code concise and elegant.
All code examples from this chapter are located in two Flash Builder projects: Pat-
terns and a Flex library project called Patterns_lib. You’ll need to import them from the
code accompanying this book.
In the previous chapter, you saw that each version of Café Townsend was built imple-
menting some of design patterns. After reading this chapter, you may want to revisit
the code of Chapter 1—you may have some new ideas about how to build yet another
version of Café.
63
Singleton
As the name singleton implies, only one instance of such a class can be instantiated,
which makes such classes useful if you’d like to create some kinds of global repositories
of the data so that various objects of your application can access them. In Chapter 1,
you saw examples of their use by various architectural Flex frameworks. For example,
ModelLocator
from Cairngorm provides a repository for the data that was retrieved by
delegates so that the views can properly display it. But to get access to the data stored
in this singleton, your application class has to first get a hold of this singleton:
var model: AppModelLocator = AppModelLocator.getInstance();
After this is done, you can access the data stored in various properties of the object to
which the variable 
model
refers.
If you need a Cairngorm singleton that can communicate with the server side, write the
following code:
service = ServiceLocator.getInstance().getHTTPService(
'loadEmployeesService');
Pretty soon, your application code gets polluted with similar lines of code that try to
get a reference to one of the singletons.
Here’s the idea. Why not just use a singleton that already exists in any Flex application
instead of introducing new ones? This is a Flex Application object that’s always there
for you because it is part of the Flex framework. Thus you can be fairly sure that there
is only one instance of it.
The problem is that the 
Application
class was not created as dynamic, and you need
to either extend it to act as a singleton with specific properties, or make it dynamic to
be able to add to the application singleton any properties dynamically. Example 2-1’s
dynamic class 
DynamicApplication
is a subclass of the Flex class 
Application
. It imple-
ments a 
Dictionary
that allows you to register your services with the application.
Example 2-1. DynamicApplication class
package com.farata.core{
import flash.utils.Dictionary;
import mx.core.Application;
public dynamic class DynamicApplication extends Application implements
IApplicationFacade{
public function DynamicApplication(){
super();
}
public static var services:Dictionary =
new Dictionary();
// Consider using getter and setter if you need to override behavior
// but a workaround with "static" problem in Flex
public function getService(name:String) : Object {
64 | | Chapter 2: Selected Design Patterns
return services[name];
}
public function addService(name:String,value: Object): void {
services[name] = value;
}
public function removeService(name:String) : void {
delete services[name];
}
public function getServices() : Dictionary {
return services;
}
}
}
This singleton class implements the 
IApplicationFacade
interface (Example 2-2), which
defines the methods to add, remove, and get a reference to the objects that are required
by your application. The main reason to use the 
IApplicationFacade
interface here is
that when you typecast an 
Application
with this interface in your code, you get Flash
Builder’s “intellisense” support and compile-time error checking.
Example 2-2. IApplicationFacade interface
package com.farata.core
{
import flash.utils.Dictionary;
public interface IApplicationFacade    {
function getService(name:String) : Object ;
function addService(name:String,value:Object):void ;
function removeService(name:String) : void ;
function getServices() : Dictionary ;
}
}
Note that the test program shown in Example 2-3 is no longer a regular 
<mx:Applica
tion>
, but rather an instance of the dynamic class shown in Example 2-1 and is located
in the Patterns_lib project. Upon application startup, it calls the function
addAllServices()
, which dynamically adds 
myModel
and 
myServices
properties to the
application object. Now any other object from the application can access this global
repository just by accessing 
DynamicApplication.services
followed by the property you
are trying to reach. This is illustrated in the functions 
getData()
and 
setData()
used in
Example 2-3.
Example 2-3. The application Singleton.mxml
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
xmlns:fx="http://www.faratasystems.com/2009/components"
creationComplete="addAllServices();">
<mx:Script>
<![CDATA[
import com.farata.core.DynamicApplication;
Singleton | | 65
import mx.core.Application;
// Add required services to the Application object.
// For illustration purposes, we'll add myModel and
// myServices
private function addAllServices() :void {
// Add the model repository to the application object
DynamicApplication.services["myModel"]= new Object();
// Add the services to the application object
DynamicApplication.services["myServices"] = new Object();
}
private function getData(serviceName:String,
key:Object):Object{
return DynamicApplication.services[serviceName][key];
}
private function setData(serviceName:String, key:Object,
value:String):void{
DynamicApplication.services[serviceName][key]=
new String(value);
}
]]>
</mx:Script>
<!--Adding values to myModel -->
<mx:Button label="Add to myModel" x="193" y="59"
click="setData('myModel',key.text, value.text)"/>
<mx:Label x="14" y="42" text="Key" fontWeight="bold"/>
<mx:Label x="14" y="14" fontWeight="bold" fontSize="14">
<mx:text>
Add one or more key/value pairs to the object MyModel
</mx:text>
</mx:Label>
<mx:Label x="91" y="42" text="Value" fontWeight="bold"/>
<mx:TextInput x="8" y="59" id="key" width="75"/>
<mx:TextInput x="89" y="59" id="value" width="96"/>
<!--Retrieving the value from a Singleton. -->
<mx:Button label="Show the value" x="8" y="122" click=
"retrievedValue.text=getData('myModel', key.text) as String"/>
fontSize="15"/>
<mx:Label x="10" y="94" fontWeight="bold" fontSize="14">
<mx:text>
Retrieve and display the value from MyModel bykey
</mx:text>
</mx:Label>
</fx:DynamicApplication>
66 | | Chapter 2: Selected Design Patterns
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested