telerik pdf viewer mvc : Convert pdf into jpg SDK control service wpf web page .net dnn eotopici031-part816

Exempt Organizations-Technical Instruction Program for FY 2003 
Social Welfare Organizations, 
Continued 
Precedents 
Illustrating 
Community 
Benefit, 
continued 
The Service will not follow the decision in Eden Hall Farm v. United 
States
, 389 F. Supp. 858 (W.D. Pa. 1975), which held that an organization 
providing recreational facilities to the employees of selected corporations 
qualifies for exemption as a social welfare organization described in IRC 
501(c)(4).  Rev. Rul. 80-205, 1980-2 C.B. 184.  In setting forth this position 
Rev. Rul. 80-205 states: 
There is no requirement that a section 501(c)(4) 
organization provide equal benefits to every member of 
the community.  The organization described in Rev. Rul. 
78-69 [1978-1 C.B. 156] that provides rush hour 
commuter bus service benefits only to those individuals 
who have a need for that service.  Similarly, an 
organization providing a particular type of recreational 
facility benefits only those who enjoy that type of 
recreation.  Such limitations are inherent in the activities 
that are undertaken to promote social welfare
In [Eden Hall
], however, the organization imposed 
limitations on the use of its facility other than those that 
were inherent in the nature of the facility.  By restricting 
use of the facility to employees of selected corporations 
and their guests, the organization is primarily benefiting a 
private group rather than primarily benefiting the common 
good and general welfare of the community. 
Published 
Precedents 
Illustrating 
Private Benefit 
An organization that provides antenna service only to its members to enable 
them to receive television is not exempt as a civic league.  Rev. Rul. 
54-394, 1954-2 C.B. 131.  See
also
Rev. Rul. 55-716, 1955-2 C.B. 263.  
Under the organization's method of operation, only members receive the 
television signal by closed circuit.  Therefore, the organization operates for 
the benefit of its members rather than for the benefit of the community.   
However, an antenna service that provides signals to any television 
receiver in the community is exempt under IRC 501(c)(4) since it 
benefits the community as a whole rather than just the members.  Rev. 
Rul. 62-167, 1962-2 C.B. 142. 
Continued on next page 
IRC 501(c)(4) Organizations – page 
I
-
Convert pdf into jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
changing pdf to jpg; convert pdf pictures to jpg
Convert pdf into jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
.pdf to .jpg online; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
Exempt Organizations-Technical Instruction Program for FY 2003 
Social Welfare Organizations, 
Continued 
Published 
Precedents 
Illustrating 
Private Benefit, 
continued 
An organization, created exclusively for the promotion of social welfare, 
that conducts weekly drawings among members of the general public as its 
principal activity and uses the profits therefrom primarily for the payment 
of its general expenses is not entitled to exemption as an organization 
described in IRC 501(c)(4).  Rev. Rul. 61-158, 1961-2 C.B. 115. 
 In American Women Buyers Club, Inc. v. Commissioner
, 238 F.2d 526 
(2nd Cir. 1964), the court affirmed denial of exemption to a membership 
corporation of female ready-to-wear buyers organized to promote the 
general good and welfare of members in the trade, encourage friendly 
relations, and give aid to members in distress.  Membership, even within 
the trade, was restrictive as approximately 15 percent of the applicants 
were rejected.  The services provided by the club (such as employment 
facilities, information about sources of supply, lectures, dinners, 
installations, publications, and sick and death benefits) were all primarily, 
if not exclusively, for the club membership.  The court commented on the 
activities of the organization as follows: 
[O]pportunities for recreation and for vocational advancement, 
enjoyable solely by the membership of a tight little trade 
association, do not promote social welfare within the meaning 
of the statute.  Id.
at 532.  
 An organization established by a collective bargaining agreement between 
an association of manufacturers and a labor union to collect federal and 
state employment taxes that the manufacturers are required to deduct from 
the wages of their unionized employees and pay over such collected 
amounts to the appropriate tax authorities does not qualify for exemption 
under IRC 501(c)(4), (c)(5), (c)(6), or (c)(9).  Rev. Rul. 66-354, 1966-2 
C.B. 207. 
In Contracting Plumbers Cooperative Restoration Corp. v. United States
488 F.2d 684 (2nd Cir. 1973), cert. denied
, 419 U.S. 827 (1974), an 
organization whose purpose was to ensure the efficient repair of "cuts" in 
city streets which resulted from its members' plumbing activities did not 
qualify for exemption under IRC 501(c)(4).  The court concluded that there 
were several factors that evidenced the existence of a substantial nonexempt 
purpose.  The factors included, but were not limited to, the members' 
substantial business interest in the organization's formation and the fact that 
each member of the cooperative enjoyed economic benefits precisely to the 
extent they used and paid for restoration services. 
Continued on next page 
IRC 501(c)(4) Organizations – page 
I
-10 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
So, feel free to convert them too with our tool. Easy converting! If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge
convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf images to jpg
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including for exporting high quality PDF from images for combining multiple image formats into one or
batch pdf to jpg converter; conversion of pdf to jpg
Exempt Organizations-Technical Instruction Program for FY 2003 
Social Welfare Organizations, 
Continued 
Published 
Precedents 
Illustrating 
Private Benefit, 
continued 
 An organization formed to purchase groceries for its membership at the 
lowest possible prices on a cooperative basis is not exempt as a social 
welfare organization.  Rev. Rul. 73-349, 1973-2 C.B. 179. 
 Organizations that provide life, sickness, and accident benefits for their 
members do not qualify under IRC 501(c)(4) because their activities 
primarily benefit their members.  Rev. Rul. 75-199, 1975-1 C.B. 160, 
which modified Rev. Rul. 55-495, 1955-2 C.B. 259.  See also
, New York 
State Association of Real Estate Boards Group Insurance Fund v. 
Commissioner
, 54 T.C. 1325 (1970). 
Police and fire relief associations are discussed later in this article. 
 An organization established by merchants which operates a public parking 
facility that provides parking for the merchants' customers free or at 
reduced rates does not qualify under IRC 501(c)(4), because it primarily 
serves the private interests of the merchants and is a business.  Rev. Rul. 
78-86, 1978-1 C.B. 152.  As stated in the revenue ruling, the Service does 
not follow the decision in Monterey Public Parking Corporation v. United 
States
, 481 F. 2d 175 (9th Cir. 1973), which held that an organization 
established by merchants to operate a public off-street parking facility that 
provides free or reduced rate parking for the merchants' customers 
qualifies as exempt under IRC 501(c)(3) or 501(c)(4).  The Service 
reasons that although there may be some public benefit, the organization 
serves the private interests of the merchants by encouraging the public to 
patronize their stores and is carrying on a business with the general public 
in a manner similar to organizations that operate for profit.  Therefore, it is 
not operated primarily for social welfare purposes. 
On the other hand, an organization whose membership is open to the 
community and that provides free parking to anyone visiting the city's 
downtown business district, is contributing to civic betterment by 
relieving congested parking conditions and therefore qualifies for IRC 
501(c)(4) exempt status.  Rev. Rul. 81-116, 1981-1 C.B. 333. 
 Personal service cooperative - a community cooperative organization 
formed to facilitate the exchange of personal services among members is 
operating primarily for the private benefit of its members and is not 
exempt from federal tax as a social welfare organization under IRC 
501(c)(4).  Rev. Rul. 78-132, 1978-1 C.B. 157. 
IRC 501(c)(4) Organizations – page 
I
-11 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Adobe PDF document can be easily loaded into your C#.NET String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg
.pdf to .jpg converter online; convert online pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. Turn multipage PDF file into image
convert pdf file to jpg format; convert pdf file to jpg file
Exempt Organizations-Technical Instruction Program for FY 2003 
Homeowners’ and Tenants’ Associations 
Introduction 
A homeowners' association is an organization that consists of all lot owners in 
a certain development and that enforces covenants for preserving the 
architecture and appearance of the development.   



Membership is usually compulsory. 
Generally, it also owns and maintains certain green areas and sidewalks.   
Depending on its activities, a homeowners' association may qualify for 
exemption from federal income tax as an organization described in IRC 
501(c)(4), IRC 501(c)(7), or IRC 528
Of the three routes to tax-exempt status, IRC 501(c)(4) imposes the strictest 
standard.  To be described in IRC 501(c)(4), a homeowners' association must 
primarily serve the community rather than the private interests of its 
members.  Therefore, the principal obstacle to exemption is the degree of 
private benefit involved in the operation of the homeowners' association. 
Lake Forest
The leading case in the area of homeowners' associations is Commissioner v. 
Lake Forest, Inc.
, 305 F. 2d 814 (1962), which arose under the predecessor of 
IRC 501(c)(4), § 101(8) of the 1939 Code.  Lake Forest was a nonprofit 
membership-housing cooperative organized by World War II veterans and 
others.  It provided low cost housing to its members.  Focusing on the words 
of the statute, the court concluded that Lake Forest was not "civic," but 
simply a private cooperative organization; that its operation was not a work of 
"social welfare," but a private economic enterprise; and that even if its objects 
included a contribution to social welfare, that was not its aim "exclusively." 
 The holding in Lake Forest
is reflected in Rev. Rul. 69-280, 1969-1 C.B. 
152.  The organization discussed in Rev. Rul. 69-280 was formed to 
provide maintenance of exterior walls and roofs of homeowner members 
in a development.  In concluding that the organization does not qualify for 
IRC 501(c)(4) exemption as a social welfare organization, the revenue 
ruling finds the organization's operations to be similar to Lake Forest in 
that both were fundamentally self-help enterprises.  Rev. Rul 69-280 
concludes: 
The organization here described is performing services that its 
members would otherwise have to provide for themselves It is 
a private cooperative enterprise for the economic benefit or 
convenience of the members.  
Continued on next page 
IRC 501(c)(4) Organizations – page 
I
-12 
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
for .NET, which can be stably integrated into C#.NET Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3
convert pdf to jpg c#; convert pdf to jpg file
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
changing pdf file to jpg; convert .pdf to .jpg
Exempt Organizations-Technical Instruction Program for FY 2003 
Homeowners’ and Tenants’ Associations, 
Continued 
Rev. Rul.  
72-102 
Rev. Rul. 72-102, 1972-1 C.B 149, attempted to enunciate standards that 
could be used to determine whether a homeowners' association could qualify 
(or maintain) IRC 501(c)(4) exempt status. 
 The organization described in Rev. Rul. 72-102 is a membership 
organization formed by a developer.  
 It is operated to administer and enforce covenants for preserving the 
architecture and appearance of a housing development, and to own 
and maintain common green areas, streets, and sidewalks for the use 
of all development residents.  
 Prospective homebuyers are advised that membership in the 
organization is required of all owners of real property within the 
housing development.  
 The organization is supported by annual assessments and member 
contributions.  Its activities are for the common benefit of the whole 
development rather than for individual residents or the developer. 
Rev. Rul. 72-102 concludes as follows:  
For the purposes of section 501(c)(4) of the Code, a neighborhood, 
precinct, subdivision, or housing development may constitute a 
community.  For example, exempt civic leagues in urban areas have 
traditionally represented neighborhoods or other subparts of much 
larger political units.  By administering and enforcing covenants, 
and owning and maintaining certain non-residential, non-
commercial properties of the type normally owned and maintained 
by municipal governments, this organization is serving the common 
good and the general welfare of the people of the entire 
development.  Even though the organization was established by the 
developer and its existence may have aided him in selling housing 
units, any benefits to the developer are merely incidental.  Also, 
even though the activities of the organization serve to preserve and 
protect property values in the community, these benefits that accrue 
to the property owner-members are likewise incidental to the goal to 
which the organization's activities are directed, the common good of 
the community. Therefore, it is held that the organization is exempt 
from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(4) of the Code
Continued on next page 
IRC 501(c)(4) Organizations – page 
I
-13 
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic control for exporting high quality PDF from images. Turn multiple image formats into one or multiple
convert pdf file into jpg format; convert pdf file to jpg online
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
convert pdf file to jpg on; convert pdf into jpg format
Exempt Organizations-Technical Instruction Program for FY 2003 
Homeowners’ and Tenants’ Associations, 
Continued 
Rev. Rul.       
72-102, 
continued 
Revenue Ruling 69-280, C.B. 1969-1, 152, which holds 
that a non-profit organization formed to provide 
maintenance of exterior walls and roofs of members' homes 
in a development is not exempt under section 501(c)(4) of 
the Code, is distinguished because that organization was 
operated primarily and directly for the benefit of individual 
members rather than for the community as a whole. 
Rev. Rul. 74-17 Rev. Rul. 74-17, 1974-1 C.B. 130, discusses a condominium housing 
association and reaches an adverse conclusion under IRC 501(c)(4).  Rev. 
Rul. 74-17 finds that homeowners' associations and condominium 
associations, even though they furnish similar services, are essentially 
different, and must be treated differently for purposes of IRC 501(c)(4).  Rev. 
Rul. 74-17 concludes as follows: 
By virtue of the essential nature and structure of a 
condominium system of ownership, the rights, duties, 
privileges, and immunities of the members of an association of 
unit owners in a condominium property derive from, and are 
established by, statutory and contractual provisions and are 
inextricably and compulsorily tied to the owner's acquisition 
and enjoyment of his property in the condominium.  In 
addition, condominium ownership necessarily involves 
ownership in common by all condominium unit owners of a 
great many so-called common areas, the maintenance and care 
of which necessarily constitutes the provision of private 
benefits for the unit owners. 
Rev. Rul. 74-99 After publication of Rev. Rul. 72-102, it became apparent its standard of 
"community" was being equated with a single housing development.   
There was also concern that Rev. Rul 72-102 made no mention of recreational 
facilities (none were present in the underlying case). 
Additionally, the term "common areas" needed more precise definition to 
prevent liberal interpretations that might encompass areas that are really little 
more than extensions of privately owned property 
Continued on next page 
IRC 501(c)(4) Organizations – page 
I
-14 
Exempt Organizations-Technical Instruction Program for FY 2003 
Homeowners’ and Tenants’ Associations, 
Continued 
Rev. Rul. 74-99, 
continued 
Rev. Rul. 74-99, 1974-1 C.B. 131, modifies Rev. Rul 72-102.  Rev. Rul 74-99 
describes the typical organization and the threshold problem as follows: 
The characteristics of the organization of homeowners 
described in Rev. Rul. 72-102 are generally typical of many 
such organizations formed in recent years that seek exemption 
under section 501(c)(4) of the Code and may be summarized 
as follows: The organization is formed by a commercial real 
estate developer as an integral part of a plan for the 
development of a subdivision.  Membership in the association 
is required of all purchasers of lots in the development.  
Membership is open only to the developer (at least for such 
time as he owns property in the development) and those who 
purchase lots.  The organization is supported by periodic 
assessments against the members and an unpaid assessment 
constitutes a lien on the property of the homeowner-member.  
The stated purposes of the organization are, generally 
speaking, to administer and enforce covenants for preserving 
the architecture and appearance of the given real estate 
development, and to own and maintain common green areas, 
streets, and sidewalks. 
The foregoing format is spelled out in written documents that 
form a part of, and are inextricably tied to, enforceable 
contracts for the sale and purchase of private property. In the 
light of this combination of factors, the prima facie 
presumption is that these organizations are essentially and 
primarily formed and operated for the individual business or 
personal benefit of their members, and, as such, do not qualify 
for exemption under section 501(c)(4) of the Code.  However, 
an organization of this kind may in certain circumstances 
overcome the presumption and qualify for recognition of 
exemption under section 501(c)(4).
Continued on next page 
IRC 501(c)(4) Organizations – page 
I
-15 
Exempt Organizations-Technical Instruction Program for FY 2003 
Homeowners’ and Tenants’ Associations, 
Continued 
Rev. Rul. 74-99, 
continued 
Essentially, Rev. Rul. 74-99 concludes that to overcome the presumption, to 
qualify for exemption under IRC 501(c)(4), a homeowners' association: 
Must serve a "community" which bears a reasonably recognizable 
relationship to an area ordinarily identified as governmental, 
Must not conduct activities directed to the exterior maintenance of private 
residences, and 
The common areas or facilities it owns and maintains must be for the use 
and enjoyment of the general public. 
On the issue of "community," Rev. Rul. 74-99 states as follows: 
A community within the meaning of section 501(c)(4) of 
the Code and the regulations is not simply an aggregation 
of homeowners bound together in a structured unit formed 
as an integral part of a plan for the development of a real 
estate subdivision and the sale and purchase of homes 
therein.  Although an exact delineation of the boundaries 
of a "community" contemplated by section 501(c)(4) is not 
possible, the term as used in that section has traditionally 
been construed as having reference to a geographical unit 
bearing a reasonably recognizable relationship to an area 
ordinarily identified as a governmental subdivision or a 
unit or district thereof. 
Rev. Rul. 80-63 Rev. Rul. 80-63, 1980-1 C.B. 116, was issued to discuss, in question and 
answer format, certain issues raised by Rev. Rul. 74-99.   
Rev. Rul. 80-63 
Question 1 
Does Rev. Rul. 74-99 contemplate that the term "community" for purposes of 
section 501(c)(4) of the Code embraces a minimum area or a certain number 
of homeowners? 
Continued on next page 
IRC 501(c)(4) Organizations – page 
I
-16 
Exempt Organizations-Technical Instruction Program for FY 2003 
Homeowners’ and Tenants’ Associations, 
Continued 
Rev. Rul. 80-63 
Answer  
No. Rev. Rul. 74-99 states that it was not possible to formulate a precise 
definition of the term "community."  The ruling merely indicates what the 
term is generally understood to mean.   
Whether a particular homeowners' association meets the requirements of 
conferring benefit on a community must be determined according to the facts 
and circumstances of the individual case.  Thus, although the area represented 
by an association may not be a community within the meaning of that term as 
contemplated by Rev. Rul. 74-99, if the association's activities benefit a 
community, it may still qualify for exemption.   
 For instance, if the association owns and maintains common areas and 
facilities for the use and enjoyment of the general public as distinguished 
from areas and facilities whose use and enjoyment is controlled and 
restricted to members of the association then it may satisfy the 
requirement of serving a community. 
Rev. Rul. 80-63 
Question 2 
May a homeowners' association, which represents an area that is not a 
community, qualify for exemption under section 501(c)(4) of the Code if it 
restricts the use of its recreational facilities, such as swimming pools, tennis 
courts, and picnic areas, to members of the association? 
Rev. Rul. 80-63 
Answer 
No. Rev. Rul. 74-99 points out that the use and enjoyment of the common 
areas owned and maintained by a homeowners' association must be extended 
to members of the general public, as distinguished from controlled use or 
access restricted to the members of the association.   
 For purposes of Rev. Rul. 74-99, recreational facilities are included in the 
definition of "common areas." 
Continued on next page 
IRC 501(c)(4) Organizations – page 
I
-17 
Exempt Organizations-Technical Instruction Program for FY 2003 
Homeowners’ and Tenants’ Associations, 
Continued 
Rev. Rul. 80-63 
Question 3 
Can a homeowners' association establish a separate organization to own and 
maintain recreational facilities and restrict their use to members of the 
association? 
Rev. Rul. 80-63 
Answer 
Yes.  An affiliated recreational organization that is operated totally separate 
from the homeowners' association may be exempt.  See Rev. Rul. 69-281, 
1969-1 C.B. 155, which holds that a social club providing exclusive and 
automatic membership to homeowners in a housing development, with no 
part of its earnings inuring to the benefit of any member, may qualify for 
exemption under section 501(c)(7) of the Code. 
Rev. Rul. 80-63 
Question 4 
Can an exempt homeowners' association own and maintain parking facilities 
only for its members if it represents an area that is not a community? 
Rev. Rul. 80-63 
Answer 
No.  By providing the facilities only for the use of its members the association 
is operating for the private benefit of its members, and not for the promotion 
of social welfare within the meaning of section 501(c)(4) of the Code. 
Flat Top Lake 
Association
In Flat Top Lake Association v. United States
, 868 F.2d 108 (4
th
Cir. 1989), 
the court concluded that a homeowners' association that encompassed a very 
large area but restricted use of its facilities to its members does not qualify for 
exemption under IRC 501(c)(4). 
Summary        
of the 
“Community” 
Issue 
The above-cited authorities disclose that the Service will not accept the 
position that an association's geographic area constitutes a "community," as 
that term is used in Rev. Rul. 74-99, without some showing that the 
association is, in the words of the Flat Top Lake
opinion, "an active part of 
society [rather than] a private refuge for those who would live apart."  Id.
at 
113. 
Rev. Rul.       
75-286 
Although an association may not benefit a "community" within the meaning 
of Rev. Rul. 74-99, if its activities are not limited to its members, but are 
directed to the general public, it can qualify for exemption under IRC 
501(c)(4).  That is the message of Rev. Rul. 75-286, 1975-2 C.B. 210. 
Continued on next page 
IRC 501(c)(4) Organizations – page 
I
-18 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested