FAO COMMODITY AND TRADE POLICY RESEARCH WORKING PAPER 
No. 32 
Food Export Restrictions: Review of the 
2007-2010 Experience and Considerations 
for Disciplining Restrictive Measures 
Ramesh Sharma
MMaayy  22001111
1
Ramesh Sharma is Senior Economist at the Trade and Markets Division of the Food and Agriculture 
Organization of the United Nations (FAO). 
Convert multiple pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
bulk pdf to jpg converter online; pdf to jpeg converter
Convert multiple pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg file; convert from pdf to jpg
FAO Commodity and Trade Policy Research Working Papers are published by the Trade and 
Markets Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). 
They are working documents and do not reflect the opinion of FAO or its member 
governments, or of other Organizations when there is a co-author. 
Also available at http://www.fao.org/economics/est/publications/en/
Additional copies of this working paper can be obtained from EST-Registry@fao.org
The designations employed and the presentation of material in this information product do not 
imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture 
Organization of the United Nations concerning the legal or development status of any 
country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its 
frontiers or boundaries. 
All rights reserved. Reproduction and dissemination of material in this information product 
for educational or other non-commercial purposes are authorized without any prior written 
permission from the copyright holders provided the source is fully acknowledged. 
Reproduction of material in this information product for resale or other commercial purposes 
is prohibited without the written permission of the copyright holders. Applications for such 
permission should be addressed to: 
Chief, Publishing Management Service, Communication Division, FAO 
Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00153 Rome, Italy or by e-mail to: copyright@fao.org. 
© FAO 2011 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf to jpg for online; batch convert pdf to jpg online
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
convert pdf to high quality jpg; convert .pdf to .jpg online
Table of Contents 
1. Introduction 
2. The incidence and types of export restrictions on foodstuffs 
2.1 Incidence 
2.2 Understanding various forms of export restrictive measures 
3. Understanding the impact of export restrictions 
14 
3.1 Economics of export restrictions 
14 
3.2 Review of selected analyses of the 2007-2010 food crisis 
16 
4. Disciplining export restrictions in the Doha Round 
20 
4.1 Negotiating proposals and ideas 
20 
4.2 Two schemes proposed for disciplining export restrictions 
23 
5. Summary and conclusions 
25 
References 
27 
Annex 1 - Timeline of export restriction measures (2007 to March 2011) 
29 
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET framework. Combine scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp
c# convert pdf to jpg; .net convert pdf to jpg
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
batch pdf to jpg converter online; convert pdf into jpg format
FOOD EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: REVIEW OF THE 
2007-2010 EXPERIENCE AND CONSIDERATIONS FOR 
DISCIPLINING RESTRICTIVE MEASURES
Abstract 
This paper reviews experiences on food export restrictions during 2007-10 and related studies and 
makes some proposals for disciplining export restrictions through the ongoing Doha Round 
negotiations. To start with, there is a strategic choice to be made. One option is to limit the 
disciplining to improving the requirements for notifications, information provision and consultations, 
along the line of the Uruguay Round Agreement on Agriculture Article 12. This is the choice that has 
been made by negotiators, as reflected in the draft Doha texts of December 2008. In the mean time, 
the 2007-10 food crisis and price spikes have prompted calls from many quarters for going beyond 
that choice to actually disciplining restrictive policies such as export tax and ban. This is the second 
option in that strategic choice. For option 1, the paper discusses issues and ideas for strengthening 
Article 12. For option 2, it makes two concrete proposals, as alternatives. One is a Tax-Rate Quota 
scheme similar to the current Tariff-Rate Quota on imports. The other is a variable export tax scheme. 
Radical departure is very unlikely to be agreed and these schemes are seen as compromises and first 
steps. These ideas follow from the review of the use of export restrictive instruments during 2007-10, 
as well as studies. The second option will require de-linking the new Article 12 from GATT Article 
XI which permits almost full freedom for restricting food export. The fundamentals of the world food 
markets have changed and so multilateral trade rules also need to adjust accordingly. 
Résumé 
Ce document passe en revue les expériences sur les restrictions à l'exportation de produits 
alimentaires au cours de la période 2007-10 et des études connexes et avance quelques propositions 
pour discipliner les restrictions à l'exportation à travers les négociations du Cycle de Doha. Tout 
d’abord, il y’a un choix stratégique à faire. Une option est de limiter les mesures disciplinaires à 
l'amélioration des exigences en matière de notifications, la diffusion d'informations, et les 
consultations, en accordance avec l'Accord du Cycle d'Uruguay sur l'agriculture l'article 12. C'est le 
choix qui a été fait par les négociateurs, comme en témoignent les projets de textes de Décembre 
2008. Parallèlement, la crise alimentaire et la hausse des prix en 2007-10 ont suscité des appels de 
toutes parts pour aller au-delà de ce choix et de discipliner les politiques restrictives comme la taxe et 
l’interdiction à l'exportation. C'est la deuxième option dans ce choix stratégique. Le présent document 
aborde les questions et les idées pour le renforcement de l'article 12. Pour l'option 2, il fait deux 
propositions concrètes comme alternatives. L'une est un régime de « Tax-Rate Quota » d'imposition 
comparable à l'actuel «Tariff-Rate Quota » sur les importations. L'autre est un régime de taxe variable 
à l'exportation. Un départ radical est très peu probable d'être accepté et ces régimes sont considérés 
comme des compromis et des premières étapes. Ces idées découlent de la revue de l'utilisation des 
instruments restrictifs à l'exportation au cours de 2007-10, ainsi que des études. Dans le cas de la 
seconde option, il faudra dissocier le nouvel article 12 de l'article XI du GATT qui permet une liberté 
totale pour les restrictions à l'exportation de produits alimentaires. Les fondamentaux des marchés 
alimentaires mondiaux ont changé et les règles commerciales multilatérales doivent être ajustées en 
conséquence. 
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
An advanced .NET control able to batch convert PDF documents to image formats in C#.NET. Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
best convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg format
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. VB.NET Components to combine various scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp
convert pdf into jpg online; changing pdf file to jpg
Resumen 
Este documento revisa experiencias y estudios sobre restricciones a la exportación de alimentos del 
período 2007-10, y realiza algunas propuestas para disciplinarlas a través de las actuales 
negociaciones de la Ronda de Doha. Para empezar, existe una elección estratégica que es necesario 
adoptar. Una primera opción sería seguir los lineamientos del Artículo 12 del Acuerdo de la Ronda 
Uruguay sobre la Agricultura, limitando la disciplina a mejorar los requisitos para realizar 
notificaciones, para proveer información y para realizar consultas. Esta es la elección tomada por los 
negociadores, tal como se refleja en los proyectos de texto de Doha de diciembre de 2008. Sin 
embargo, la crisis alimentaria del 2007/10 y el alza de precios han visto un llamamiento por parte de 
muchos sectores para ir más allá de esta alternativa, disciplinando las políticas restrictivas como ser 
los impuestos a la exportación y la prohibición a las exportaciones. Esta sería la segunda opción. El 
documento aborda temas e ideas que podrían fortalecer el Artículo XII. Con relación a la segunda 
opción, se hacen dos propuestas concretas y alternativas. Una es crear « Tax-Rate Quota », parecidos 
al actual sistema de «Tariff-Rate Quota » que se aplica a las importaciones. Otra es crear un esquema 
de impuestos a la exportación variable. Es poco factible que se busquen salidas radicales, por lo que 
estos dos sistemas representan un punto de partida y/o compromisos. Para la segunda opción será 
necesario desvincular el nuevo Artículo 12 del Artículo XI del GATT, que permite total libertad para 
aplicar restricciones a la exportación. Los fundamentos de los mercados mundiales de los alimentos 
han cambiado, y también deberán hacerlo las reglas comerciales multilaterales. 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Gratis control for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file.
convert pdf file into jpg format; conversion of pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
PDF. Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. Turn
convert pdf to jpg c#; batch pdf to jpg online
1. Introduction 
Export taxes and restrictions have a very long history and continue to be prominent policy 
instruments for both agricultural and non-agricultural products. The recent World Bank 
studies on distortions to agricultural incentives documents the history and pervasiveness of 
these measures (Anderson 2009). Export restrictions on foodstuffs came to prominence 
during 2007-11 as one of the key drivers of the food crisis and price spikes. With projections 
of tight world food markets and increased price volatility for many years to come, export 
restrictions have been singled out as one of the key issues to be addressed by the global 
community of nations. The appropriate place for this is the Doha Round agricultural 
agreement being negotiated. 
The purpose of this paper is to contribute to this work on disciplining export restrictions. This 
is addressed in Section 4. Following the review of various negotiating proposals and ideas, it 
proposes two schemes or measures, as alternatives, for disciplining export restrictions. But 
there is a strategic choice to be made by the community negotiating the trade rules before 
considering the specific schemes. There are two options.  
The first option is to do nothing in this Round to export restrictive measures but to limit to the 
current provisions of Article 12 of the Uruguay Round Agreement on Agriculture (URAA) 
and the proposals in the draft Doha texts (the December 2008 draft Modalities), i.e. to try to 
improve on things like notifications, information provision and consultations. In Section 4, 
the paper reviews proposals and ideas on this option and identifies several areas where 
improvements need to be made and could indeed be made. If left to themselves as they 
currently are, there is a significant risk that the Doha Round disciplines on exports will 
continue to remain weak as in the Uruguay Round. And given the outlook for high and 
volatile food prices, this will erode importers’ confidence on the world food markets and 
undermine the progress already made in the global trading system, including in market access 
and domestic subsidies.  
The second option is to go beyond strengthening Article 12 and to actually discipline 
restrictive measures. This means going beyond what is currently permitted by GATT Article 
XI. As a result of the food crisis and price spikes, there is a widespread support for this 
option, although not much has been taking place in the Doha negotiations itself. In Section 
4.2, two concrete proposals are made for this – a Tax-Rate Quota scheme, similar to the 
current Tariff-Rate Quota (TRQ) on the import side, and a variable export tax regime.  
These ideas follow almost naturally from the review of the instruments currently used by 
many countries and from considering genuine concerns of many export restricting countries 
with price instability and food insecurity. These topics - the “building blocks” for the above 
proposals - are covered in Sections 2 and 3. 
Section 2 surveys the incidence or prevalence of export restrictions on foodstuffs during 
2007-2010. The survey shows that export restrictions were often the preferred responses for 
many countries as they faced the consequences of or the threat from the price spikes. There 
was also a considerable experimentation with various restrictive instruments from a tax to 
ban in different contexts. A new scheme for disciplining export restrictions, to command 
consensus in a negotiating environment, needs to incorporate into it some of the desirable 
features of these diverse instruments used during the crisis. 
Section 3 discusses the economics of export restrictions and covers two topics. The first is a 
brief tour of the standard trade theory on the consequences of export restriction. As part of 
that tour, some model-based studies of an ex ante nature are also illustrated. The second part 
reviews some studies undertaken during 2007-2010 and focussed on the food crisis. These 
sought to understand the specific role of export restrictions in the price spikes as well as the 
impacts and consequences. The overall consensus is that while an exogenous shock like a 
drought started the process, export restrictions did amplify, in significant ways, the price rises 
into spikes. In the process, food importers suffered not just from the high prices but also from 
inconveniences and uncertainties trying to secure supplies from alternative sources. On the 
other hand, consumers in exporting countries gained as the rises in food prices were 
restrained. 
In a paper on global trade governance and food security, Konandreas (2011) has argued that 
to the extent that the fundamentals of the world food markets have changed (towards high 
and volatile food prices), multilateral rules must also adjust accordingly to be able to address 
trade issues that may arise also in periods when food is dear. This is essential to ensure the 
credibility of the global trading system and to foster an environment conducive to more trade 
openness on the part of importing countries, assuring them that the world food market is a 
reliable source for imports even in periods of relative scarcity. Besides export restrictions, 
there are several other elements of the draft Doha texts that need to be revisited with a view 
to adjusting the rules to the new situation. The adjustments needed were discussed in an 
earlier paper (Sharma and Konandreas 2008) and covered the following: export restrictions; 
food aid; export credits; food import financing facility in the context of the Marrakesh 
NFIDC Decision; State Trading Enterprises; stockholding and domestic food distribution; 
biofuels; and trade facilitation. 
2. The incidence and types of export restrictions on foodstuffs 
2.1 Incidence 
Several agencies and analysts compiled information on export restrictions on foodstuffs 
during the food crisis. A FAO survey in 2008 (FAO 2008) based on a coverage of 77 
countries had showed that roughly one-quarter of the countries imposed some form of export 
restriction during the food crisis. Other policy responses recorded then were as follows: about 
half took measures to reduce food import taxes, 55 percent used price controls or consumer 
subsidies, one-quarter took actions to increase supply drawing on cereal stocks, and 16 
percent showed no policy activities whatsoever. 
What follows contributes to that literature by extending the coverage to end-March 2011 
(2007-2010, in short).
2
Policy information on export restrictions used below is presented in 
Annex 1 of this paper. The information is compiled from many sources, notably from the 
FAO GIEWS’ survey of national food policies, which was intensified during the food crisis.
3
Annex 1 provides detailed time-line of restrictive measures for the 7-8 countries that were 
prominent in the media during the food crisis, and briefly for about 20 other countries. 
2
There are also several papers on restrictive measures on other agricultural products as well as minerals and 
metals (e.g. Piermartini 2004 and Korinek and Kim 2010). The WTO Trade Policy Reviews have become a 
valuable source for this type of information. 
3
GIEWS, FAO - Country Policy Monitoring: Main Food-related Policy Measures 
http://www.fao.org/giews/countrybrief/policy_index.jsp
Two summary tables are constructed – one showing the incidence of restrictive measures 
relative to all policy measures (Table 1), and the other showing the types of the restrictive 
measures used (Table 2).  
Table 1 shows that of the sample of 105 countries covered with some information on food 
policy measures (export restrictions and many others), 33 countries (31 percent of the 
sample) resorted to one or more export restrictive measures. This is only slightly higher than 
the 25 percent recorded in the 2008 FAO survey. Likewise, 16 percent of all the 528 food 
policy measures recorded were export restrictive measures. Excluding the five countries in 
the “others” region (the sample is not representative enough for the region), Asia tops the list 
in terms of countries applying restrictive measures – 50 percent of all, versus 21 percent in 
Africa and 18 percent in the LAC. In terms of policy measures also, 23 percent of all 
measures were export restrictive for Asia, versus 10 percent in the other two regions. 
Table 1 - Food export restricting countries and restrictive measures in a sample of 105 
countries, 2007 to end-March 2011 
-------------- Countries -----------------
-------------- Measures ------------------
All 
Export 
% of 
All 
Export 
% of 
countries
restricting
restricting
policy
restriction
restrictive 
Region covered (#) ) countries (#)
countries
measures (#) ) measures (#)
measures 
Africa
42
9
21
142
15
11
Asia
30
15
50
210
49
23
LAC
28
5
18
148
15
10
Others
5
4
80
28
8
29
Total
105
33
31
528
87
16
Source: Author, based on information in Annex 1 for export restrictions and FAO food policy monitoring 
database for other measures. 
Next, Table 2 illustrates the various types of export restrictive measures used by the eight 
major countries covered and a summary for other 20 countries. The instrument in bold is 
considered to be the most commonly used measure.  
One typical practice common to many of the cases in Table 2 is to combine various 
instruments, both sequentially and concurrently as governments reacted to rapid changes in 
food prices at home and in the world markets. There were three cases where only a single 
instrument was used: MEPs on Basmati rice by India; MEPs on all rice varieties by Pakistan; 
and quotas by Ukraine on all products. In other cases, there were combinations: ordinary tax, 
variable tax and quotas by Argentina; VAT rebate, tax and quotas by China; ban, MEP and 
ban again on ordinary rice by India; ban, quotas, ban on wheat by India; tax, ban, quota on 
rice by Egypt; tax, ban and quota on wheat by Pakistan; tax and ban by Russia; and ban, 
MEPs and progressive tax on rice by Vietnam. Although subject to further analysis, this 
experience shows that various countries find different instruments appropriate for different 
products at different times. In general, a more restrictive measure is used when spikes are 
more pronounced. This preference for the combination of instruments needs to be taken into 
account in considering alternatives for disciplining export restrictive measures (Section 4). 
Table 2 - Illustration of the use of various export restrictive measures during 2007-2010 
Country 
Product 
Restrictive policy instruments used 
Argentina 
China 
India 
Egypt 
Pakistan 
Russia 
Ukraine 
Vietnam 
Other 20 
countries 
Wheat, maize, soybean, sunflower 
seeds 
Rice, wheat, maize, flour 
a) Basmati rice 
b) Ordinary rice 
c) Wheat 
Rice 
a) Rice (ordinary and basmati) 
b) Wheat 
a) Wheat, maize, barley, flour 
b) Rapeseed 
Wheat, maize, barley 
Rice 
35 products affected, mostly 
cereals, but also sugar, beans, oils, 
cattle  
Tax (ad valorem), Tax (variable), Quota, Ban 
Tax (ad valorem), Quota/license 
a) MEP, Tax (specific), STE  
b) Ban, MEP, STE  
c) Ban, Quota, STE 
Tax (specific), Quota, Ban 
a) MEP 
b) Tax (ad valorem), Quota, Ban 
a) Tax (ad valorem), Ban 
b) Tax (ad valorem
Quota 
MEP, Quota, Ban, Tax (variable), STE 
Ban in 32 cases, 1 MEP, 1 Tax (ad valorem) and 
1 STE  
Source: Author, based on Annex 1.  
Note: In a majority of cases, multiple instruments were used, both concurrently and sequentially. The instrument 
shown in bold is considered to be the most common measure used. MEP is minimum export price and STE is 
state trading enterprise.  
2.2 Understanding various forms of export restrictive measures 
As an integral part of the review of the experience during 2007-2010, this sub-section 
provides briefs on various instruments used. This understanding is essential for considering 
alternatives for disciplining such measures in the Doha Round. Based on Table 2, the 
following eight instruments are discussed. For the purpose of this paper, export restriction is a 
general term used to indicate all forms of restrictions, from a tax to the ban.
4
All these 
measures have the effect of reducing the flow of export, and so should fall within the scope of 
the measures aimed at “prohibition and restriction” of exports in GATT Article XI.
5
1. Export tax – specific, ad valorem, mixed 
2. Export tax - variable 
3. Export tax – differential (DET) 
4. Minimum Export Price (MEP) 
5. Quota  
6. Government to government (G2G) sales 
7. Export ban or prohibition 
4
Adjustment of the VAT rebate rates could also be added to this list because this also influences exports. This 
instrument was found to be used in one case (China). 
5
This list reminds of the list of measures in the footnote to URAA Article 4 for imports which were prohibited 
by that Article with the exception of ordinary customs duties, TRQs and Special Treatment (Annex 5). 
10 
8. State Trading Enterprises (STEs) 
Ordinary export tax 
Also known as ordinary customs duty, an export tax could be in specific or ad valorem form, 
or mixed, typically the applied rate being higher of the two. For imports, a specific tariff 
provides greater protection as import prices fall. Similar consideration applies to an export 
tax. If based on f.o.b. value, a fixed specific tax results into higher ad valorem rates when 
domestic prices are falling, thus providing greater protection against exports at all times to 
lower-valued products (e.g. to ordinary than to superior rice). Difficulty in customs valuation 
is also a factor for favouring a specific tax. Also for this reason, an export tax is often applied 
to constructed values, including a MEP and the world price. 
In theory, under some assumptions, all restrictive measures have an equivalent tax and thus 
some level of tax should substitute for other measures like quota, and a prohibitive tax being 
the same thing as a ban. In the survey, export taxes were not that high, the maximum being 
about 40 percent.
6
This is in contrast to the case with tariffs on the import side. One reason 
why taxes are relatively low could be that other forms of restrictions are not prohibited by 
GATT/URAA rules, and so there is no need for very high taxes.  
GATT Article XI permits export taxation. But as this is not bound, it does not mean much. 
Simply banning other restrictive measures without first capping export taxes does not achieve 
anything useful.  
Export tax - variable 
These are progressive tax schedules where the applied rate varies directly with the world 
market price, i.e. higher the world price, higher the tax. The key motives are domestic price 
stabilization and revenue. Table 3 illustrates two such examples. In March 2008, the 
Argentine government modified export tax regime by implementing a sliding tax scheme, 
based on fob prices for wheat, maize, soybeans and sunseed. The table shows the details for 
wheat only. The minimum and maximum rates in the bands for other products were as 
follows: maize 25 percent and 40 percent (prevailing fixed rate 25 percent), soybeans 23.5 
percent and 49 percent (prevailing fixed rate 35 percent) and sunseed 23.5 percent and 45 
percent (prevailing fixed rate 32 percent). This scheme was announced for four years, but was 
discontinued in just four months, reverting in July 2008 to the fixed tax regime. Such a 
scheme may be compared with Chile’s price band policy under which import tariffs varied 
automatically with the moving averages of the world market prices. A WTO dispute panel 
found that scheme not WTO-compatible for imports and Chile has discontinued that policy. 
The Indonesian palm oil progressive tax regime continues. 
6
Even for minerals and metals, applied taxes are low (in the 3-30 percent range) (Korinek and Kim 2010), 
despite many of the exporters enjoying considerable market power. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested