sageways, and done it with nods, and signs with his hands. Then he
took his place over against the wall. He was the softest, glidingest,
stealthiest man I ever see; and there warn’t no more smile to him than
there is to a ham.
They had borrowed a melodeum—a sick one; and when everything
was ready a young woman set down and worked it, and it was pretty
skreeky and colicky, and everybody joined in and sung, and Peter was
the only one that had a good thing, according to my notion. Then
the Reverend Hobson opened up, slow and solemn, and begun to
talk; and straight off the most outrageous row busted out in the cel-
lar a body ever heard; it was only one dog, but he made a most pow-
erful racket, and he kept it up right along; the parson he had to stand
there, over the coffin, and wait—you couldn’t hear yourself think. It
was right down awkward, and nobody didn’t seem to know what to
do. But pretty soon they see that long-legged undertaker make a sign
to the preacher as much as to say, “Don’t you worry—just depend on
me.” Then he stooped down and begun to glide along the wall, just
his shoulders showing over the people’s heads.
So he glided along, and the powwow and racket getting more and
more outrageous all the time; and at last, when he had gone around
two sides of the room, he disappears down cellar. Then in about two
second we heard a whack, and the dog he finished up with a most
amazing howl or two, and then everything was dead still, and the
parson begun his solemn talk where he left off. In a minute or two
here comes this under taker’s back and shoulders gliding along the
wall again; and so he glided and glided around three sides of the
room, and then rose up, and shaded his mouth with his hands, and
stretched his neck out towards the preacher, over the people’s heads,
and says, in a kind of a coarse whisper, “He had a rat! Then he
drooped down and glided along the wall again to his place. You could
see it was a great satisfaction to the people, because naturally they
wanted to know. A little thing like that don’t cost nothing, and it’s
just the little things that makes a man to be looked up to and liked.
There warn’t no more popular man in town than what that under-
taker was.
Well, the funeral sermon was very good, but pison long and tire-
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
184
Change pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file into jpg format; changing pdf to jpg
Change pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
.pdf to .jpg online; pdf to jpeg converter
some; and then the king he shoved in and got off some of his usual
rubbage, and at last the job was through, and the undertaker begun
to sneak up on the coffin with his screw-driver. I was in a sweat
then, and watched him pretty keen. But he never meddled at all;
just slid the lid along as soft as mush, and screwed it down tight
and fast. So there I was!  I didn’t know whether the money was in
there or not.  So, says I, s’pose somebody has hogged that bag on
the sly?—now how do I know whether to write to Mary Jane or
not? S’pose she dug him up and didn’t find nothing, what would
she think of me? Blame it, I says, I might get hunted up and jailed;
I’d better lay low and keep dark, and not write at all; the thing’s
awful mixed now; trying to better it, I’ve worsened it a hundred
times, and I wish to goodness I’d just let it alone, dad fetch the
whole business!
They buried him, and we come back home, and I went to watch-
ing faces again—I couldn’t help it, and I couldn’t rest easy. But noth-
ing come of it; the faces didn’t tell me nothing.
The king he visited around in the evening, and sweetened every-
body up, and made himself ever so friendly; and he give out the idea
that his congregation over in England would be in a sweat about
him, so he must hurry and settle up the estate right away and leave
for home. He was very sorry he was so pushed, and so was every-
body; they wished he could stay longer, but they said they could see
it couldn’t be done. And he said of course him and William would
take the girls home with them; and that pleased everybody too,
because then the girls would be well fixed and amongst their own
relations; and it pleased the girls, too—tickled them so they clean
forgot they ever had a trouble in the world; and told him to sell out
as quick as he wanted to, they would be ready. Them poor things was
that glad and happy it made my heart ache to see them getting fooled
and lied to so, but I didn’t see no safe way for me to chip in and
change the general tune.
Well, blamed if the king didn’t bill the house and the niggers and
all the property for auction straight off—sale two days after the
funeral; but anybody could buy private beforehand if they wanted to.
So the next day after the funeral, along about noontime, the girls’
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
185
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour.
convert pdf to jpeg; pdf to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Web Security. Your PDF and JPG files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
best pdf to jpg converter for; convert pdf image to jpg image
joy got the first jolt. A couple of nigger traders come along, and the
king sold them the niggers reasonable, for three-day drafts as they
called it, and away they went, the two sons up the river to Memphis,
and their mother down the river to Orleans.  I thought them poor
girls and them niggers would break their hearts for grief; they cried
around each other, and took on so it most made me down sick to see
it. The girls said they hadn’t ever dreamed of seeing the family sepa-
rated or sold away from the town. I can’t ever get it out of my mem-
ory, the sight of them poor miserable girls and niggers hanging
around each other’s necks and crying; and I reckon I couldn’t a stood
it all, but would a had to bust out and tell on our gang if I hadn’t
knowed the sale warn’t no account and the niggers would be back
home in a week or two.
The thing made a big stir in the town, too, and a good many come
out flatfooted and said it was scandalous to separate the mother and
the children that way.  It injured the frauds some; but the old fool he
bulled right along, spite of all the duke could say or do, and I tell you
the duke was powerful uneasy.
Next day was auction day. About broad day in the morning the
king and the duke come up in the garret and woke me up, and I see
by their look that there was trouble. The king says:
“Was you in my room night before last?”
“No, your majesty”—which was the way I always called him when
nobody but our gang warn’t around.
“Was you in there yisterday er last night?”
“No, your majesty.”
“Honor bright, now—no lies.”
“Honor bright, your majesty, I’m telling you the truth. I hain’t been
a-near your room since Miss Mary Jane took you and the duke and
showed it to you.”
The duke says:
“Have you seen anybody else go in there?”
“No, your grace, not as I remember, I believe.”
“Stop and think.”
I studied awhile and see my chance; then I says:
“Well, I see the niggers go in there several times.”
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
186
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
convert online pdf to jpg; change from pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputDirectory = @"C:\output\"; // Convert tiff to jpg and show How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C#
convert multi page pdf to jpg; change from pdf to jpg on
Both of them gave a little jump, and looked like they hadn’t ever
expected it, and then like they had.
Then the duke says:
“What, all of them?”
“No—leastways, not all at once—that is, I don’t think I ever see
them all come outat once but just one time.”
“Hello! When was that?”
“It was the day we had the funeral. In the morning. It warn’t early,
because I overslept. I was just starting down the ladder, and I see
them.”
“Well, go on, goon! What did they do? How’d they act?”
“They didn’t do nothing. And they didn’t act anyway much, as fur
as I see. They tiptoed away; so I seen, easy enough, that they’d shoved
in there to do up your majesty’s room, or something, s’posing you
was up; and found you warn’tup, and so they was hoping to slide out
of the way of trouble without waking you up, if they hadn’t already
waked you up.”
“Great guns, thisis a go!” says the king; and both of them looked
pretty sick and tolerable silly.  They stood there a-thinking and
scratching their heads a minute, and the duke he bust into a kind of
a little raspy chuckle, and says:
“It does beat all how neat the niggers played their hand. They let
on to be sorrythey was going out of this region! And I believed they
wassorry, and so did you, and so did everybody. Don’t ever tell me
any more that a nigger ain’t got any histrionic talent.  Why, the way
they played that thing it would fool anybody. In my opinion, there’s
a fortune in ‘em. If I had capital and a theater, I wouldn’t want a bet-
ter layout than that—and here we’ve gone and sold ‘em for a song.
Yes, and ain’t privileged to sing the song yet. Say, where IS that
song—that draft?”
“In the bank for to be collected. Where wouldit be?”
“Well, that’sall right then, thank goodness.”
Says I, kind of timid-like:
“Is something gone wrong?”
The king whirls on me and rips out:
“None o’ your business! You keep your head shet, and mind y’r own
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
187
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Allow to change converting image with adjusted width & height; Change image resolution Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in
to jpeg; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
changing pdf file to jpg; convert pdf to jpg converter
affairs—if you got any.  Long as you’re in this town don’t you forgit
that—you hear?” Then he says to the duke, “We got to jest swaller it
and say noth’n’: mum’s the word for us.”
As they was starting down the ladder the duke he chuckles again,
and says:
“Quick sales andsmall profits! It’s a good business—yes.”
The king snarls around on him and says:
“I was trying to do for the best in sellin’ ‘em out so quick. If the
profits has turned out to be none, lackin’ considable, and none to
carry, is it my fault any more’n it’s yourn?”
“Well, they’dbe in this house yet and we wouldn’tif I could a got
my advice listened to.”
The king sassed back as much as was safe for him, and then
swapped around and lit into meagain. He give me down the banks
for not coming and tellinghim I see the niggers come out of his room
acting that way—said any fool would a knowedsomething was up.
And then waltzed in and cussed himselfawhile, and said it all come
of him not laying late and taking his natural rest that morning, and
he’d be blamed if he’d ever do it again. So they went off a-jawing; and
I felt dreadful glad I’d worked it all off on to the niggers, and yet
hadn’t done the niggers no harm by it.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
188
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Users may easily change image size, rotate image angle, set image rotation in dpi Covert JPG & JBIG2 image with high-quality; Provide user-friendly interface
convert pdf to jpg for online; change pdf to jpg on
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
convert pdf page to jpg; pdf to jpg converter
B
y and by it was getting-up time. So I come down the ladder
and started for downstairs; but as I come to the girls’ room the door
was open, and I see Mary Jane setting by her old hair trunk, which
was open and she’d been packing things in it—getting ready to go to
England. But she had stopped now with a folded gown in her lap,
and had her face in her hands, crying. I felt awful bad to see it; of
course anybody would. I went in there and says:
“Miss Mary Jane, you can’t a-bear to see people in trouble, and I
can’t—most always. Tell me about it.”
So she done it. And it was the niggers—I just expected it. She said
the beautiful trip to England was most about spoiled for her; she 
didn’t know howshe was ever going to be happy there, knowing the
mother and the children warn’t ever going to see each other no
more—and then busted out bitterer than ever, and flung up her
hands, and says:
“Oh, dear, dear, to think they ain’t evergoing to see each other any
more!”
“But they will—and inside of two weeks—and I knowit!” says I.
Laws, it was out before I could think! And before I could budge she
throws her arms around my neck and told me to say it again, say it
again, say it again!
I see I had spoke too sudden and said too much, and was in a close
place. I asked her to let me think a minute; and she set there, very
impatient and excited and handsome, but looking kind of happy and
eased-up, like a person that’s had a tooth pulled out.  So I went to
CHAPTER TWENTY-EIGHT
189
studying it out. I says to myself, I reckon a body that ups and tells
the truth when he is in a tight place is taking considerable many
resks, though I ain’t had no experience, and can’t say for certain; but
it looks so to me, anyway; and yet here’s a case where I’m blest if it
don’t look to me like the truth is better and actuly saferthan a lie. I
must lay it by in my mind, and think it over some time or other, it’s
so kind of strange and unregular. I never see nothing like it. Well, I
says to myself at last, I’m a-going to chance it; I’ll up and tell the
truth this time, though it does seem most like setting down on a kag
of powder and touching it off just to see where you’ll go to. Then I
says:
“Miss Mary Jane, is there any place out of town a little ways where
you could go and stay three or four days?”
“Yes; Mr. Lothrop’s. Why?”
“Never mind why yet. If I’ll tell you how I know the niggers will
see each other again inside of two weeks—here in this house—and
provehow I know it—will you go to Mr. Lothrop’s and stay four
days?”
“Four days!” she says; “I’ll stay a year!”
“All right,” I says, “I don’t want nothing more out of youthan just
your word—I druther have it than another man’s kiss-the-Bible.” She
smiled and reddened up very sweet, and I says, “If you don’t mind it,
I’ll shut the door—and bolt it.”
Then I come back and set down again, and says:
“Don’t you holler. Just set still and take it like a man. I got to tell
the truth, and you want to brace up, Miss Mary, because it’s a bad
kind, and going to be hard to take, but there ain’t no help for it.
These uncles of yourn ain’t no uncles at all; they’re a couple of
frauds—regular dead-beats. There, now we’re over the worst of it,
you can stand the rest middling easy.”
It jolted her up like everything, of course; but I was over the
shoal water now, so I went right along, her eyes a-blazing higher
and higher all the time, and told her every blame thing, from
where we first struck that young fool going up to the steamboat,
clear through to where she flung herself on to the king’s breast at
the front door and he kissed her sixteen or seventeen times—and
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
190
then up she jumps, with her face afire like sunset, and says:
“The brute! Come, don’t waste a minute—not a second—we’ll have
them tarred and feathered, and flung in the river!”
Says I:
“Cert’nly. But do you mean beforeyou go to Mr. Lothrop’s, or—”
“Oh,” she says, “what am I thinkingabout!” she says, and set right
down again. “Don’t mind what I said—please don’t—you won’t, now,
willyou?” Laying her silky hand on mine in that kind of a way that
I said I would die first. “I never thought, I was so stirred up,” she
says; “now go on, and I won’t do so any more. You tell me what to
do, and whatever you say I’ll do it.”
“Well,” I says, “it’s a rough gang, them two frauds, and I’m fixed so
I got to travel with them a while longer, whether I want to or not—
I druther not tell you why; and if you was to blow on them this town
would get me out of their claws, and I’d be all right; but there’d be
another person that you don’t know about who’d be in big trouble.
Well, we got to save him, hain’t we? Of course. Well, then, we won’t
blow on them.”
Saying them words put a good idea in my head. I see how maybe I
could get me and Jim rid of the frauds; get them jailed here, and then
leave. But I didn’t want to run the raft in the daytime without any-
body aboard to answer questions but me; so I didn’t want the plan to
begin working till pretty late tonight.
I says: “Miss Mary Jane, I’ll tell you what we’ll do, and you won’t
have to stay at Mr. Lothrop’s so long, nuther. How fur is it?”
“A little short of four miles—right out in the country, back here.”
“Well, that ‘ll answer. Now you go along out there, and lay low till
nine or half-past tonight, and then get them to fetch you home
again—tell them you’ve thought of something. If you get here before
eleven put a candle in this window, and if I don’t turn up wait till
eleven, and thenif I don’t turn up it means I’m gone, and out of the
way, and safe. Then you come out and spread the news around, and
get these beats jailed.”
“Good,” she says, “I’ll do it.”
“And if it just happens so that I don’t get away, but get took
up along with them, you must up and say I told you the whole
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
191
thing beforehand, and you must stand by me all you can.”
“Stand by you! indeed I will. They sha’n’t touch a hair of your
head!” she says, and I see her nostrils spread and her eyes snap when
she said it, too.
“If I get away I sha’n’t be here,” I says, “to prove these rapscallions
ain’t your uncles, and I couldn’t do it if I washere. I could swear they
was beats and bummers, that’s all, though that’s worth something.
Well, there’s others can do that better than what I can, and they’re
people that ain’t going to be doubted as quick as I’d be. I’ll tell you
how to find them. Gimme a pencil and a piece of paper. There—
‘Royal Nonesuch, Bricksville.’ Put it away, and don’t lose it. When
the court wants to find out something about these two, let them send
up to Bricksville and say they’ve got the men that played the Royal
Nonesuch, and ask for some witnesses—why, you’ll have that entire
town down here before you can hardly wink, Miss Mary. And they’ll
come a-biling, too.”
I judged we had got everything fixed about right now. So I says:
“Just let the auction go right along, and don’t worry. Nobody don’t
have to pay for the things they buy till a whole day after the auction
on accounts of the short notice, and they ain’t going out of this till
they get that money; and the way we’ve fixed it the sale ain’t going to
count, and they ain’t going to get no money. It’s just like the way it
was with the niggers—it warn’t no sale, and the niggers will be back
before long. Why, they can’t collect the money for the niggersyet—
they’re in the worst kind of a fix, Miss Mary.”
“Well,” she says, “I’ll run down to breakfast now, and then I’ll start
straight for Mr. Lothrop’s.”
“’Deed, thatain’t the ticket, Miss Mary Jane,” I says, “by no man-
ner of means; go beforebreakfast.”
“Why?”
“What did you reckon I wanted you to go at all for, Miss Mary?”
“Well, I never thought—and come to think, I don’t know. What
was it?”
“Why, it’s because you ain’t one of these leatherface people. I don’t
want no better book than what your face is. A body can set down and
read it off like coarse print. Do you reckon you can go and face your
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
192
uncles when they come to kiss you good-morning, and never—”
“There, there, don’t! Yes, I’ll go before breakfast—I’ll be glad to.
And leave my sisters with them?”
“Yes; never mind about them. They’ve got to stand it yet a while.
They might suspicion something if all of you was to go. I don’t want
you to see them, nor your sisters, nor nobody in this town; if a neigh-
bor was to ask how is your uncles this morning your face would tell
something. No, you go right along, Miss Mary Jane, and I’ll fix it
with all of them. I’ll tell Miss Susan to give your love to your uncles
and say you’ve went away for a few hours for to get a little rest and
change, or to see a friend, and you’ll be back tonight or early in the
morning.”
“Gone to see a friend is all right, but I won’t have my love given to
them.”
“Well, then, it sha’n’t be.” It was well enough to tell herso—no
harm in it. It was only a little thing to do, and no trouble; and it’s the
little things that smooths people’s roads the most, down here below;
it would make Mary Jane comfortable, and it wouldn’t cost nothing.
Then I says: “There’s one more thing—that bag of money.”
“Well, they’ve got that; and it makes me feel pretty silly to think
HOW they got it.”
“No, you’re out, there. They hain’t got it.”
“Why, who’s got it?”
“I wish I knowed, but I don’t. I hadit, because I stole it from them;
and I stole it to give to you; and I know where I hid it, but I’m afraid
it ain’t there no more. I’m awful sorry, Miss Mary Jane, I’m just as
sorry as I can be; but I done the best I could; I did honest. I come
nigh getting caught, and I had to shove it into the first place I come
to, and run—and it warn’t a good place.”
“Oh, stop blaming yourself—it’s too bad to do it, and I won’t allow
it—you couldn’t help it; it wasn’t your fault. Where did you hide it?”
I didn’t want to set her to thinking about her troubles again; and I
couldn’t seem to get my mouth to tell her what would make her see
that corpse laying in the coffin with that bag of money on his stomach.
So for a minute I didn’t say nothing; then I says:
“I’d ruther not tellyou where I put it, Miss Mary Jane, if you don’t
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
193
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested