mvc show pdf in div : Changing pdf file to jpg control Library system web page asp.net .net console IAguide21-part1101

Creating IA
11
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Activity: Conducting user interviews and creating data sheets
1
Interviews can help you understand users and what they come to your site to find. 
Interviewing users helps you to filter out your personal habits and focus instead on 
the behaviors and motivations of your target audiences. 
In Step 1, you prioritized the target audiences of the site. While a strong preference 
should be given to your primary target audience, you should select a variety of 
interviewees from each of your audiences to get a reliable sampling of visitor 
behaviors and characteristics.
If you cannot conduct interviews, you can still use the questions below to help you 
imagine the characteristics and needs of your users. Interviewing seven to 10 users 
(real and/or imagined) is usually sufficient to represent the majority of relevant user 
traits and goals.
First, collect general information about each of your interviewees. Below are 
examples of the kinds of information you might want to gather. You may not need to 
gather all of this information as some elements may not be relevant to your project.
Name • Profession/Role (e.g., faculty, administrator, reporter, student) • Location • 
Geographic profile (including if he/she comes from a suburb or a city) • Education 
• Interests/sports/hobbies • Family type (e.g., single/married, number of children, 
number of children in college) • Financial aid needs • Type of computer the 
individual uses to access information (desktop, laptop, PDA, cell phone) • Web 
browsers the individual uses • Type of Internet connection the individual has (dial-
up, cable, etc.)
Second, find out about the interviewee’s goals upon visiting your site: 
What does the individual really want to accomplish? • What type of information does 
the individual seek? • Does the individual need certain areas of the site to be secure 
(e.g., entering financial and personal data)? What impression does the individual 
want to have upon exiting the site?
If you are redesigning an existing site, you should ask these additional 
questions:
What does the individual like about the existing site? What frustrates the individual 
in the current site? Is the content written in a way that the individual understands?
Now, create data sheets for your interview findings:
Once you have completed this exercise, you will need to create data sheets (see 
the illustration on the next page) for each of the interviews. Data sheets are active 
tools. They build a common understanding of users’ objectives and remind the 
development team — at each stage of the process — to consider these needs. The 
data sheets can include a photo or drawing to represent your user, and a sampling 
of key information to remind you about his or her goals, needs and interests.
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
} interviews
+ data sheets
/ Content areas
/ Organizing
/ Site map
/ Navigation
/ Labeling
/ Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
(continued on the next page)
 “Persona Creation and Usage Toolkit  (George Olsen)
Convert .pdf to .jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch convert pdf to jpg online; convert online pdf to jpg
Convert .pdf to .jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf file into jpg format; convert pdf page to jpg
Creating IA
12
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
} interviews
+ data sheets
/ Content areas
/ Organizing
/ Site map
/ Navigation
/ Labeling
/ Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
Sample illustration of a user data sheet
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert pdf into jpg; convert pdf images to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF files to JPG.
batch pdf to jpg online; batch pdf to jpg converter online
Creating IA
13
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Step 3. Defining your site’s content areas
Defining your content areas will help you to develop your navigational structure. 
This step is best done in a group of three to five people so that each person can 
represent the profiles from one or two of your user data sheets.
First, analyze the content you already have — either in print or on the Web — and 
decide which pieces should be added to your new site, updated or discarded. Keep 
or update only the content that will be useful to your users.
Next, list all of the content areas that your users will want to find on your site. The 
ideal way to do this is to ask a wide sampling of actual users (who are members of 
your target audiences) what they will be seeking (see “Conducting user interviews 
and creating data sheets” on page 11). If you do not have access to actual users, 
you will need to imagine what they will want to find on your site. Once you’ve done 
this, you may need to set aside any user goals that are not practical to include in the 
scope of your project. Also, you may need to add items your key stakeholders want 
to include.
The “Content area brainstorming” activity on the next page is an exercise that can 
help you to further define the content areas of your site.
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
} Content areas
/ brainstorm
/ Organizing
/ Site map
/ Navigation
/ Labeling
/ Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
batch convert pdf to jpg; convert multipage pdf to jpg
Creating IA
14
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Activity: Content area brainstorming
1
In the previous step you began to shape the content of your site by determining your 
users’ goals. However, it is important that you “dig deeper” into the offerings of your 
office/department to make sure that you include all of the specific items that your 
users might need to find. For example, a user may want to be able to find an annual 
lecture that your department sponsors. So, instead of simply having a page on your 
site that describes the particular lecture, you may want to include pages that discuss 
all of the lectures or events you offer.
This activity will help you compile the important content areas for your site. The 
activity works well in a small group of three to five people who each can represent 
the profiles from one or two of your user data sheets. One person will act as the 
facilitator and will guide the group through this exercise. If you are working on this 
activity by yourself, just imagine yourself representing the information on each of the 
data sheets in turn.
A. 
The facilitator writes out the key stakeholder goals and target audiences in 
a place that is visible to the group.
B. 
The user data sheets are put in a place that is visible to the group.
C. 
Each member of the group chooses a data sheet. More than one person 
can represent the same data sheet if there aren’t enough to go around, but 
all of the data sheets need to be represented by at least one person.
D. 
Everyone in the group gets blank paper and takes a few minutes to write 
down three important questions their user will ask when visiting the site. 
E. 
Now each person should give his/her paper (with three questions written on 
it) to the person on his/her right.
F. 
Using the new sheet, add three additional important questions to the list. 
Don’t repeat questions you already have written down.
G. 
Continue passing the papers to the right and adding three more questions 
for a few rounds, or until it appears that all of the important questions have 
been listed.
H. 
The facilitator should then compile the questions and combine those that 
are essentially the same. 
I. 
Once this is done, it may be necessary to set aside any questions that 
are not practical to include in the scope of your project. Also, it may be 
necessary to add items that are important to your key stakeholders, but did 
not surface in this exercise.
J. 
The facilitator should reword each of the questions into a one- to three-word 
content area heading.
Examples of rewording questions into subject headings include:
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
/ Content areas
} brainstorm
/ Organizing
/ Site map
/ Navigation
/ Labeling
/ Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
(continued on the next page)
Bridging Cultures Conference Tutorial: Card-Sorting and Cluster Analysis for Information Architecture Design (Larry Wood, 2005)
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf to gif or jpg; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
convert pdf to jpeg; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
Creating IA
15
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
• “Whom do I contact to sign up for a workshop?” might become “Contact Info.”
• “What does your office/department do?” might become “Mission” or 
“Services.”
• “How do I get to your office?” might become “Directions.”
• “Is your department sponsoring any upcoming events?” might become 
“Calendar.”
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
/ Content areas
} brainstorm
 / Organizing
/ Site map
/ Navigation
/ Labeling
/ Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
best pdf to jpg converter; bulk pdf to jpg converter
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. Copyright © <2000-2015> by <RasterEdge.com>. All Rights Reserved.
.net convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpeg on
Creating IA
16
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
/ Content areas
     } Organizing
/ grouping
/ Site map
/ Navigation
/ Labeling
/ Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
Step 4. Organizing the content areas
In this step, you will organize the content areas compiled in the brainstorming 
activity (in Step 3) into groups of similar or related topics. These groups will be given 
temporary names that later will be refined to become your navigational menu items.
This activity will help you group and label your content areas so that your navigation 
will be more intuitive for users. 
Before beginning, it may be helpful to review the main structure and section titles of 
a similar kind of site that you find easy to use. You can use this site as a guide as 
you are organizing your site’s content and navigation.
Creating IA
17
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
/ Content areas
/ Organizing
grouping
/ Site map
/ Navigation
/ Labeling
/ Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
Activity: Grouping content
A. 
Write each of your content areas from the brainstorming activity in Step 3 
on separate sticky notes.
B.  
Sort the sticky notes with similar subjects into groups. These groups will 
form the basis for your site’s main navigation.
C. 
Keep the number of groups to a minimum. Generally, navigational items are 
more easily scanned and remembered when they are kept to six or fewer
2
.
D.  
Give each of these groups a temporary name. You will refine these names 
later.
E. 
Place the sticky notes together in their groups on a big sheet of paper (see 
the illustration “Sample of content groupings” on the following page). 
F. 
Take out any duplicate items so that you don’t end up with two pages 
that contain the same information. If multiple sections need the same 
information, choose a location for the information to exist and link to it when 
necessary. For example, if you have a list of staff contact numbers and you 
would like it to be accessible from both your “About Us” and your “People” 
sections, you can place it under “About Us” and link to it from “People.” This 
will prevent confusion for your site visitors and will prevent you from having 
to update the information in two places. Of course, linking between pages 
will happen later in your process when you begin creating your pages, but 
make a list of important links now so you don’t forget.
G. 
Items that you would like to appear on every page of your site can be 
placed in a footer or a toolbar. A footer often includes items like the date 
the site was last updated, the University copyright statement, a link to site 
feedback, a contact phone number or an address. A link to the University’s 
search, access to WebMail or access to an intranet are examples of items a 
toolbar can contain. However, it’s best if the items in a toolbar are kept to a 
maximum of five to prevent visual clutter.
H. 
If content areas can be placed on the same Web page, combine them 
and come up with a new name for the subject of this page. For example, 
“Program Overview” and “Our Mission” can probably be combined into one 
page titled, “Who We Are.”
I. 
Now, see if the subjects within each main grouping can be combined into 
subcategories (see the illustration “Sample of subcategory grouping” on the 
following page). Create temporary names for any subcategories.
Bridging Cultures Conference Tutorial: Card-Sorting and Cluster Analysis for Information Architecture Design (Larry Wood, 2005)
“The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on Our Capacity for Processing Information” (George A. Miller, 1956)
(continued on the next page)
Creating IA
18
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
/ Content areas
/ Organizing
grouping
/ Site map
/ Navigation
/ Labeling
/ Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
Sample of content groupings
Sample of subcategory grouping
Creating IA
19
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Step 5. Creating the site map
Now you are ready to create and validate the site map (a visual representation of 
the content areas). See the illustration below for an example of how to organize 
a site in a hierarchical way. In this type of structure pages have a parent/child 
relationship. Not every page has a child, but all pages have a parent.
Take your content categories and create a site map like the one shown below. Once 
you are finished, you should test this site map by asking users from your target 
audiences whether they find your structure logical. Make adjustments accordingly.
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
/ Content areas
/ Organizing
      } Site map
/ Navigation
/ Labeling
/ Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
Example of a site map
parent page
children pages
Creating IA
20
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Step 6. Outlining your navigational structure
Take the site map you created in Step 5 and draw it to emulate the navigation 
scheme in Illustration 1 below. The subpages are listed as bullets under the main 
content area headings (marked with a “   ”).
The navigational items of your site should not point to other sites, nor should they 
point to Acrobat (.pdf) files, Microsoft Office documents or other non-HTML files. 
Doing this can be disorienting for the site visitor and can be problematic for those 
with slow connections. 
Links to other sites and documents should be 
placed in your central content area. Alternatively, 
they can be placed in “highlights” or “related links” 
areas of the page (see Illustration 2 below).
A helpful analogy for good navigation is to think of 
the menus/submenus of your site as if they were 
the table of contents of a textbook. The table of 
contents should not be cluttered with items that do 
not describe the main content areas of the book. 
Therefore, the main navigation of your site should 
not include links to pages outside of your site, 
downloadable documents or e-mail addresses. 
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
/ Content areas
/ Organizing
/ Site map
} Navigation
/ Labeling
/ Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
Illustration 1: Sketch of a 
navigation scheme created 
from a site map
(continued on the next page)
Illustration 2: Example of a “related links” section
This is a “related 
links” area.
This is a link to another 
section within this site.
This is a link to a page 
outside of this site.
The central content area can contain links to 
other sites and documents, too.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested