mvc show pdf in div : Convert pdf file to jpg format software control project winforms azure web page UWP IAguide22-part1102

Creating IA
21
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
/ Content areas
/ Organizing
/ Site map
} Navigation
/ Labeling
/ Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
Once you have confirmed that each of your navigational links will bring you directly 
to a page of content in your site, you should begin to consider the way in which your 
navigation will appear. 
Vertical navigation in smaller sites
If the number of your navigational links is less than 20 (including all content area 
headings and subpages), you can probably limit your navigation to the right or left 
vertical column of your site. If your site needs more than six primary navigation links, 
they can be separated with spacers to make shorter sub-groupings (see Illustration 
3 below). 
Adding a horizontal navigation bar
If the number of your navigational links is more than 20, you may need to place 
the main content area headings in a horizontal navigation bar and the subpage 
navigation in the vertical column, as shown in Illustration 4 on the next page. 
Notice how each selected item in the horizontal navigation has corresponding 
vertical navigation showing only the pages in that section. In Illustration 4A, you 
can see that the “People” section has vertical navigation to “Overview,” “Faculty,” 
“Visitors,” “Lecturers & Preceptors,” “Student Interns,” “Executive Committee” and 
“Advisory Council.” Similarly, in Illustration 4B, you can see that the “Courses & 
Resources” section has vertical navigation to “Overview,” “Course Listings” and 
“Resources.” 
You should try to keep the number of main navigation links in a horizontal bar to six 
or fewer to avoid visual clutter.
Illustration 3: Sample of a site using vertical navigational structure
(continued on the next page)
Convert pdf pages to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert online pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg
Convert pdf pages to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf file to jpg online; change format from pdf to jpg
Creating IA
22
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
/ Content areas
/ Organizing
/ Site map
} Navigation
/ Labeling
/ Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
A
B
Adding audience navigation
If your site is very large — more than 100 pages, for example — you might consider 
adding another level of navigation. This navigation will link directly to overview 
pages that contain brief introductory content aimed at each of your site’s key 
audiences. These audience pages should direct site users to relevant content 
elsewhere in the site, rather than duplicating that content. This is important for three 
reasons: 
• Updating duplicate content creates extra work.
• Information might get updated in only one place and may conflict with 
versions elsewhere. 
• Each content item should be placed in a logical “home” so that it can be found 
easily again. 
These audience links should be grouped separately from your topic section 
headers. If you choose horizontal navigation for your audience links, it should have 
six or fewer links. For an example of a navigation bar with links to audience pages, 
see the University’s home page (www.princeton.edu).
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
c# convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg for
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code convert TIFF file all pages to jpg images.
convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi; change pdf file to jpg
Creating IA
23
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Step 7.  Labeling the content areas
It is important to give accurate and meaningful labels to your content areas. Users 
are clicking on words, so the words need to make sense. Test your nomenclature by 
showing people the navigation scheme you outlined in Step 6. Ask them what they 
would expect to find if they were to click on a particular link or button. Keep in mind 
that your labels should be succinct (not more than three words long), straightforward 
and consistent with your desired tone. Users are hoping to find information quickly 
and do not want to have to decipher the meaning of your links or read through 
whole sentences. Notice how the category names are refined into more intuitive 
labels, shown on the right side of the example below.
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
/ Content areas
/ Organizing
/ Site map
/ Navigation
} Labeling
/ Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
Example of refining content area labels
ORIGINAL LABeL
RefINed LABeL
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf to jpg c#; convert pdf file into jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
change pdf to jpg format; pdf to jpeg
Creating IA
24
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Step 8. Creating wireframes
A wireframe is a sketch or blueprint that closely represents how the areas of a page 
will be organized. Below you can see how a simple, hand-drawn wireframe sketch 
can be used as a guide for incorporating all of the necessary page elements in a 
well-organized and functional way. It is important that you use your wireframes as 
guides when you collaborate with your designers and developers. This will help 
ensure that your information architecture is not inadvertently revised or obscured 
later during the design and development processes. 
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
/ Stakeholder goals 
/ User goals
/ Content areas
/ Organizing
/ Site map
/ Navigation
/ Labeling
} Wireframes
/ What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
Examples of the relationship of a wireframe to a final design 
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
convert pdf file to jpg on; change pdf into jpg
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
Creating IA
25
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
What’s next?
You have now developed the information architecture for your site. You may need 
to analyze and modify this architecture as you continue to work on your site, but it 
should serve as your guide for the rest of the process. 
As mentioned earlier, you will need to work with visual designers, writers and 
technical staff to help you through the rest of the phases of your site’s development 
— defining the project scope, writing the content, creating or modifying the visual 
design and building the site. The following sections of this document outline 
standards and requirements that can be used as guides for all of these phases. 
Keep thinking about your key stakeholders’ goals and the information recorded on 
your user data sheets as you test your assumptions through the remainder of your 
site development process. As often as you can, test the effectiveness of your site’s 
visual design, content and programming decisions with members of your target 
audiences.
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
/ Who, what, why
/ How
What’s next
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. C# class source codes and online demos are provided for .NET.
change pdf file to jpg file; change pdf to jpg on
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
.pdf to jpg converter online; convert pdf page to jpg
IA standards
IA standards
27
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
Information architecture standards
The purpose of information architecture is to create an organization for your site’s 
content that will be as intuitive and easy for your visitors to use as possible. To 
achieve this goal you should keep refining your site so that visitors know where 
they are at all times, they can find what they seek, and interactive elements behave 
consistently, so that users can predict what will happen when they click on an item.
Naming conventions
Having a logical naming convention helps visitors know where they are and how to 
return. For example, you should use related, memorable, easily spelled words for 
the Web address, menu labels and page headers. The example below shows good 
consistency between the Web address, page header and menu label. 
This naming convention is especially important for subpages. Not all visitors start at 
the home page, so subpages need to provide some context, too.
Visual design
More options are not always better. Your pages should remain uncluttered to allow 
the visitor to quickly scan for pertinent information and plan the next click.
Content location conventions
Put general information on the introductory pages and details on the subpages.
If you need to call special attention to a detailed topic several levels down, use a 
hyperlink in the content area.
Site title
Be sure to have your site’s title prominently displayed near the top of every page 
of your site in order to help visitors know where they are. In the case of University 
departments and offices, the site title most often is the name of your office or 
department. In other cases, it may focus on a topic, such as the “Welcome Class of 
2011” site for newly admitted students.
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
(continued on the next page)
Web address
menu label
page header
Example of consistent naming conventions
site title
}
IA standards
28
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
The site title usually is located in the same place on every page. However, it may be 
larger and/or placed in a different location on your home page. It typically is used as 
a hotlink back to the site’s home page, as well.
Navigation
Use straightforward wording, in one- to three-word phrases, for your navigational 
link titles.
Usability studies have shown that people process information in shorter lists 
more quickly and effectively, so it is best to limit the number of menu items in 
your navigation to six or fewer. If longer lists of navigational items are necessary, 
organize them into groups of six or fewer. Then use dividers or spacing between 
groups. You can organize groups alphabetically or thematically. If you group by 
theme, it is helpful to have the links that are most important to your target audiences 
appear first.
If your site is large (more than 20 pages), consider adding a horizontal navigation 
bar for your main section links. The vertical navigation bar would then contain links 
for the subsections.
Avoid linking to pages outside of your site, downloadable documents or e-mail 
addresses directly from a navigational menu item. Instead, create an intermediate 
page that lists these links in the content area.
Make sure that every page in your site can be accessed from some level of your 
navigation. (Navigational levels can be folded and unfolded and do not need to be 
visible at all times.) The “back” button of your browser should never be the only 
means available for returning to a page within your site.
Sites should not employ radical navigation schemes just to be different. Users 
appreciate conventional navigation that is consistent and easy to follow. 
Using “fly-out menus,” which are lists of navigation links that appear when a 
user moves the mouse cursor over a navigation link, may be a common practice 
on websites; however, we strongly advise against the use of this navigational 
construct. They add an unnecessary level of complexity for the site visitors and they 
often block out the important information underneath them. Using point-and-click 
methods to drill down through categories is preferred by most users. Fly-out menus, 
especially those that have multiple hierarchical levels, require more manual dexterity 
than simple point-and-click and could be problematic for users with reduced motor 
control or who rely on keyboard-only navigation. If you use fly-out menus, always 
provide a point-and-click alternative.
If you are using Flash for your navigation, place descriptive alternative text links 
elsewhere in your page. Otherwise, visitors using screen readers may not be able to 
navigate your site.
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
}
University website requirements
Requirements
30
Guide to Creating Website Information Architecture and Content :: Version 2.2 :: 01.22.09
University website requirements
• Link to the University’s home page from your site’s home page.
• If you use the Princeton University logotype and/or shield, you must use 
an approved treatment with proper fonts and colors. You can request the 
University logotype and/or shield from the Office of Communications by 
e-mailing commpub@princeton.edu.
• Link to either the University’s search or a site-specific search from your 
site’s home page. If you choose to link to a site-specific search, you must 
include a link to the University’s search from your site-specific search page. 
See www.princeton.edu/odus for an example.
• Provide the University’s copyright notice, including the current year —  
“© 2008 The Trustees of Princeton University” — on your site’s home page.
• Provide contacts for site owners somewhere within your site.
• Provide a page modification date on your site’s home page.
• Provide critical information in a format that does not require a plug-in (third-
party software) for viewing.
 Provide <alt> tags containing alternative text for all of your site graphics and 
photos. (See page 35 for more details.)
• Be sure to have permission to post each photo or other visual elements 
before loading them on your site. If you are not sure about the copyright 
issues for a specific image, do not use it.
• Be sure that your office has permission to reuse any copyrighted text that 
appears in your site.
• Include photo credits.
• Grammar, spelling and punctuation must follow a style guide and be used 
consistently on all pages. The University recommends the Web Editorial Style 
Guide (www.princeton.edu/webteam/style) which is based on the Associated 
Press Stylebook.
• Language should conform with the University’s Equal Opportunity Policy and 
Nondiscrimination Statement (see page 43). If in doubt, contact the Office of 
the General Counsel or Terri Harris Reed, Vice Provost for Institutional Equity 
and Diversity.
• Do not advertise, endorse, link to or include logos for external corporations, 
or other commercial ventures anywhere on your site — such actions are 
prohibited by the University. There are limited exceptions to this rule. 
You may credit an external entity for copyright purposes, but such credits 
must be factual and not advertising. For example, to credit a photo from 
AbleStock.com, following their guidelines and ours, use: “© [insert current 
year] JupiterImages Corporation” near the photo or on a credit page. 
For clarification, please contact Lauren Robinson-Brown, director of 
communications, lauren@princeton.edu.
• “Rights, Rules, Responsibilities” applies to the Web, and University entities 
are responsible for making sure their Web content follows these guidelines.
• Make sure that your site represents Princeton University well.
Preface
Introduction
Creating IA 
IA standards
University requirements
Creating content
Pre-launch checklist
Glossary
References
}
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested