161
C H A P T E R  
Analog Signal Processing 
Using Operational 
Amplifiers 
T
his chapter presents operational amplifier circuits that are important for 
interfacing analog components in a mechatronic system.  
INPUT SIGNAL
CONDITIONING
AND INTERFACING
- discrete circuits 
amplifiers
- filters
- A/D, D/D
OUTPUT SIGNAL
CONDITIONING
AND INTERFACING
- D/A, D/D
- PWM
- power transistors
power op amps
GRAPHICAL
DISPLAYS
- LEDs
- digital displays
- LCD
- CRT
SENSORS
- switches
- potentiometer
- photoelectrics
- digital encoder
- strain gage
- thermocouple
- accelerometer
- MEMs 
ACTUATORS
- solenoids, voice coils
- DC motors
- stepper motors
- servo motors
- hydraulics, pneumatics
MECHANICAL SYSTEM
- system model
- dynamic response
DIGITAL CONTROL
ARCHITECTURES
- logic circuits
- microcontroller
- SBC
- PLC
- sequencing and timing
- logic and arithmetic
- control algorithms
- communication
amplifiers
CHAPTER OBJECTIVES 
After you read, discuss, study, and apply ideas in this chapter, you will:  
1.  Understand the input/output characteristics of a linear amplifier 
2.  Understand how to use the model of an ideal operational amplifier in circuit 
analysis 
Change pdf to jpg format - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
bulk pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg file
Change pdf to jpg format - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf pages to jpg online; pdf to jpeg converter
162 
CHAPTER 5 
Analog Signal Processing Using Operational Amplifiers
3.  Know how to design op amp circuits 
4.  Be able to design an inverting amplifier, noninverting amplifier, summer, 
difference amplifier, instrumentation amplifier, integrator, differentiator, 
and sample and hold amplifier 
5.  ier   
5.1 INTRODUCTION 
it is essential that engineers develop a basic understanding of the acquisition and 
convert physical quantities (e.g., temperature, strain, displacement, flow rate) into 
currents or voltages, usually the latter. The transducer output is usually described as 
an  analog signal,  which is continuous and time varying. 
Often the signals from transducers are not in the form we would like them to be. 
They may
■ 
Be too small, usually in the millivolt range  
■ 
Be too “noisy,” usually due to electromagnetic interference  
■ 
installation  
■ 
Have a DC offset, usually due to the transducer and instrumentation design    
Many of these problems can be remedied, and the desired signal information 
e
mon form of signal processing is amplification, where the magnitude of the voltage 
signal is increased. Other forms include signal inversion, differentiation, integration, 
addition, subtraction, and comparison. 
Analog signals are very different from digital signals, which are discrete, using 
only a finite number of states or values. Since computers and microprocessors require 
digital signals, any application involving computer measurement or control requires 
analog-to-digital conversion. This chapter covers the basic elements of analog sig-
operational amplifier is an integrated circuit used as a building block in many of 
verting analog signals into a format that can be processed by digital devices such as 
computers.   
5.2 AMPLIFIERS 
People have spent their lives studying and writing about amplifiers, so we cannot 
expect to do justice to the subject in a few pages. However, we will look at the 
salient features of amplifiers and determine how we may design one using integrated 
circuits. 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
try out some settings and then create the PDF files with the button at the bottom. The perfect conversion tool. JPG is the most widely used image format, but we
convert pdf file into jpg format; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
JPG is the most common image format on the internet. The outputs of our conversion service are always JPG files to even if pictures are saved in a PDF in other
.pdf to jpg converter online; .pdf to .jpg online
Figure 5.1 Amplifier model. 
amplifier
V
in
V
out
+
+
I
in
I
out
5.2 Amplifiers  
163
Ideally, an  amplifier  increases the amplitude of a signal without affecting the 
phase relationships of different components of the signal. When choosing or design-
ing an amplifier, we must consider size, cost, power consumption, input impedance, 
used to construct the amplifier. Prior to the 1960s, vacuum tube amplifiers were 
common, but they were heavy power consumers with significant heat dissipation. 
Portable units were large and heavy and required frequent battery replacement. 
Since its advent,  solid state  technology, where charge carriers move through a solid 
semiconductor material, has replaced the vacuum tube technology, where bulky 
tubes enclosed a gas at low pressure through which electrons flowed. Today, solid 
state transistors and integrated circuits have dramatically changed amplifier design, 
resulting in small, cool-running amplifiers. They consume little power and are easily 
made portable using rechargeable batteries. 
Generally, we model an amplifier as a two-port device, with an input and output 
voltage referenced to ground, as illustrated in  Figure 5.1 . The voltage  gain   A  
v 
of an 
amplifier defines the factor by which the voltage is changed:
V
out
A
v
V
in
(5.1)  
Normally we want an amplifier to exhibit amplitude linearity, where the gain is 
constant for all frequencies. However, amplifiers may be designed to intentionally 
amplify only certain frequencies, resulting in a filtering effect. In such cases, the out-
put characteristics are governed by the amplifier’s bandwidth and associated cutoff 
frequencies. 
The input impedance of an amplifier,  Z  
in
, is defined as the ratio of the input volt-
age and current:
Z
in
V
in
I
in
(5.2)  
Most amplifiers are designed to have a large input impedance so very little current is 
drawn from the input. 
The output impedance is a measure of how much the output voltage drops with 
output current:
Z
out
Δ
V
out    
I
in
(5.3)  
where the voltage drop 
Δ
V  
out 
is measured relative to the output voltage with no cur-
rent. Most amplifiers are designed to have a very small output impedance so the 
output voltage will not change much as the output current changes. 
JPEG Image Viewer| What is JPEG
JPEG, JPG. Disadvantages of JPEG Format. Lossy compression, somewhat reduces the image quality other file formats, including Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; change from pdf to jpg
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp load a program with an incorrect format", please check You can also directly change PDF to Gif image file
change pdf to jpg image; pdf to jpeg
Figure 5.2 Op amp terminology and schematic representation. 
+
inverting input 
terminal
noninverting input terminal
output terminal
V
V
+
V
out
164 
CHAPTER 5 
Analog Signal Processing Using Operational Amplifiers
The input impedance of an amplifier is analogous to that of a voltmeter, and the out-
put impedance is analogous to that of a voltage source.   
5.3 OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS 
The operational amplifier, or  op amp,  is a low-cost and versatile integrated circuit 
consisting of many internal transistors, resistors, and capacitors manufactured into 
a single chip of silicon. It can be combined with external discrete components to 
create a wide variety of signal processing circuits. The op amp is the basic building 
block for
■ 
Amplifiers  
■ 
Integrators  
■ 
Summers  
■ 
Differentiators  
■ 
Comparators  
■ 
A/D and D/A converters  
■ 
Active filters  
■ 
Sample and hold amplifiers   
Wves its 
name from its ability to perform so many different operations.   
5.4  IDEAL MODEL FOR THE OPERATIONAL 
AMPLIFIER 
Figure 5.2  shows the schematic symbol and terminal nomenclature for an ideal op 
amp. It is a differential input, single output amplifier that is assumed to have infinite 
gain. The two inputs are called the  inverting input,  labeled with a minus sign, and 
the  noninverting input,  labeled with a plus sign. The  ∞  symbol is sometimes used 
in the schematic to denote the infinite gain and the assumption that it is an ideal 
op amp. The voltages are all referenced to a common ground. The op amp is an 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
to load a program with an incorrect format", please check Add(new Bitmap(Program. RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with
change file from pdf to jpg on; convert pdf to jpg converter
C# Image: How to Download Image from URL in C# Project with .NET
If you want other format, you can use the image you can also save a gif, jpeg / jpg, or bmp provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
convert pdf file to jpg online; convert pdf into jpg online
Figure 5.3 Op amp feedback. 
feedback loop
V
V
+
V
out
+
Figure 5.4 Op amp equivalent circuit. 
+
V
V
+
I
+
= 0
I 
= 0
I
out
+
V
out
V
out
5.4 Ideal Model for the Operational Amplifier 
165
active device  requiring connection to an external power supply, usually plus and 
minus 15 V. The external supply is not normally shown on circuit schematics. Since 
the op amp is an active device, output voltages and currents can be larger than the 
signals applied to the inverting and noninverting terminals. 
As illustrated in  Figure 5.3 , an op amp circuit usually includes  feedback  from 
the output to the negative (inverting) input. This so-called  closed loop  configuration 
results in stabilization of the amplifier and control of the gain. When feedback is 
absent in an op amp circuit, the op amp is said to have an  open loop  configuration. 
This configuration results in considerable instability due to the very high gain, and 
it is seldom used. The utility of feedback will become evident in the examples pre-
sented in the following sections. 
Figure 5.4  illustrates an ideal model that can aid in analyzing circuits contain-
ing op amps. This model is based on the following assumptions that describe an 
ideal op amp:
1.   It has infinite impedance at both inputs;  hence, no current is drawn from the 
input circuits. Therefore,
I
+
I
0
=
=
(5.4)    
2.   It has infinite gain.  As a consequence, the difference between the input voltages 
must be 0; otherwise, the output would be infinite. This is denoted in  Figure 5.4  
by the shorting of the two inputs. Therefore,
V
+
V
(5.5)   
VB.NET Word: Word to JPEG Image Converter in .NET Application
Word doc into high quality jpeg / jpg images; Convert a be converted into Jpeg image format and then powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
batch convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf pages to jpg
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Powerful .NET control to batch convert PDF documents to tiff format in Visual C# .NET program. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images.
convert pdf to jpg; bulk pdf to jpg converter
Figure 5.5 741 op amp pin-out. 
5
6
7
8
4
2
3
4
6
5
7
8
1
+
–15 V
+15 V
V
out
x
x
top view
x
166 
CHAPTER 5 
Analog Signal Processing Using Operational Amplifiers
Even though we indicate a short between the two inputs, we assume no current 
may flow through this short.  
3.   It has zero output impedance.  Therefore, the output voltage does not depend on 
the output current.   
Note that  V  
out
 V  
, and  V
are all referenced to a common ground. Also, for stable 
linear behavior, there must be feedback between the output and the inverting input. 
These assumptions and the model may appear illogical and confusing, but they 
provide a close approximation to the behavior of a real op amp when used in a cir-
cuit that includes negative feedback. With the aid of this ideal model, we need only 
Kirchhoff’s laws and Ohm’s law to completely analyze op amp circuits. 
inte
op amp produced by many IC manufacturers is 741. It is illustrated in  Figure 5.5  with 
its pin configuration (pin-out). As with all ICs, one end of the chip is marked with an 
the IC) and consecutively starting with 1 at the left side of the marked end. For a 741 
series op amp, pin 2 is the inverting input, pin 3 is the noninverting input, pins 4 and 7 
are for the external power supply, and pin 6 is the op amp output. Pins 1, 5, and 8 are 
not normally used, and no connections are required.  Figure 5.6  illustrates the internal 
design of a 741 IC available from National Semiconductor. Note that the circuits are 
composed of transistors, resistors, and capacitors that are easily manufactured on a 
single silicon chip. The most valuable details for the user are the input and output 
parts of the circuit having characteristics that affect externally connected components. 
The manufacture of integrated circuits is very involved, requiring extremely 
expensive equipment. Video Demo 5.1 shows various common packages in which 
ICs are made available, and Video Demos 5.2 through 5.4 describe and illustrate 
all of the steps of the manufacturing process. Fortunately, due to high production 
v
scale prevails, and ICs can be sold at very affordable prices. 
Many different op amp designs are available from IC manufacturers. The input 
impedances, bandwidth, and power ratings can vary significantly. Also, some require 
only a single-output (unipolar) power supply. Although the 741 is widely used, 
another common op amp is the TL071 manufactured by Texas Instruments. Its pin 
V
i
d
e
o
D
e
m
o
5.1Integrated 
circuits
5.2Integrated 
circuit manu-
facturing process 
stages
5.3Chip 
manufacturing 
process
5.4How a CPU 
is made
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
convert pdf file into jpg; convert pdf images to jpg
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
convert pdf file to jpg format; changing pdf file to jpg
Figure 5.6 741 internal design.  (Courtesy of National Semiconductor, 
Santa Clara, CA)  
5.5 Inverting Amplifier 
167
configuration is identical to the 741, but because it has FET inputs, it has a larger 
input impedance and a wider bandwidth. 
IC manufacturers provide complete information on their devices in documents 
called  data sheets.  Internet Links 5.1 and 5.2 point to the complete data sheets for 
both the 741 and TL071. If you don’t have much experience looking at these data 
sheets, they can be very overwhelming. However, they contain all the information 
you would ever need to use the devices. Useful information includes the device pin-
out (e.g., see  Figure 5.5 ), input and output current and voltage specifications, voltage 
vides some guidance on specific things to look for in an op data sheet.   
5.5 INVERTING AMPLIFIER 
An  inverting amplifier  is constructed by connecting two external resistors to an op 
amp as shown in  Figure 5.7 . As the name implies, this circuit inverts and amplifies 
the input voltage. Note that the resistor  R  
F 
forms the feedback loop. This feedback 
loop always goes from the output to the inverting input of the op amp, implying 
negative feedback. 
We now use Kirchhoff’s laws and Ohm’s law to analyze this circuit. First, we 
replace the op amp with its ideal model shown within the dashed box in  Figure 5.8 . 
I
n
t
e
r
n
e
t
L
i
n
k
5.1μA741 op 
amp data sheet
5.25.2 TL071 
FET input op amp 
data sheet
Figure 5.7 Inverting amplifier. 
R
+
V
in
R
F
V
out
+
Figure 5.8 Equivalent circuit for an inverting amplifier. 
+
R
C
+
+
V
out
i
out
V
out
V
in
i
in
R
F
ideal model
168 
CHAPTER 5 
Analog Signal Processing Using Operational Amplifiers
Applying Kirchhoff’s current law at node C and utilizing assumption 1, that no cur-
rent can flow into the inputs of the op amp,
i
in
= −i
out
(5.6)  
Also, because the two inputs are assumed to be shorted in the ideal model, C is effec-
tively at ground potential:
V
C
= 0
(5.7)  
Because the voltage across resistor  R  is  V  
in
  V  
C
  V  
in
, from Ohm’s law,
V
in
i
in
R
(5.8)  
and because the voltage across resistor  R  
F 
is  V  
out
  V  
C
  V  
out
,
V
out
i
out
R
 F
(5.9)  
Substituting Equation 5.6 into Equation 5.9 gives
V
out
= − i
in
R
F
(5.10)  
Di
V
out
V
in
--------
R
F
R
------
= –
(5.11)  
Figure 5.9 Illustration of inversion. 
V
in
t
V
out
t
5.6 Noninverting Amplifier 
169
Therefore, the voltage gain of the amplifier is determined simply by the external 
resistors  R  
F 
and  R,  and it is always negative. The reason this circuit is called an 
inverting amplifier is that it reverses the polarity of the input signal. This results in a 
phase shift of 180 °  for periodic signals. For example, if the square wave  V  
in
shown in 
Figure 5.9  is connected to an inverting amplifier with a gain of  - 2, the output  V  
out
is 
inverted and amplified, resulting in a larger amplitude signal 180 °  out of phase with 
the input. 
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM 5.1 
Kitchen Sink in an Op Amp Circuit 
Consider the following op amp circuit: 
R
+
kitchen
sink
R
F
V
in
V
out
+
What is the effect of the kitchen sink at the noninverting input of the op amp? 
5.6 NONINVERTING AMPLIFIER 
The schematic of a  noninverting amplifier  is shown in  Figure 5.10 . As the name 
implies, this circuit amplifies the input voltage without inverting the signal. Again, 
we can apply Kirchhoff’s laws and Ohm’s law to determine the voltage gain of 
Figure 5.10 Noninverting amplifier. 
+
R
F
R
V
out
V
in
+
Figure 5.11 Equivalent circuit for a noninverting amplifier. 
+
C
+
+
R
i
in
i
out
R
F
V
out
V
in
V
out
170 
CHAPTER 5 
Analog Signal Processing Using Operational Amplifiers
this amplifier. As before, we replace the op amp with the ideal model shown in the 
dashed box in  Figure 5.11 . 
The voltage at node C is  V  
in
because the inverting and noninverting inputs are at 
the same voltage. Therefore, applying Ohm’s law to resistor  R, 
i
in
V
in
R
----------
=
(5.12)  
and applying it to resistor  R  
F 
,
i
out
V
out
V
in
R
F
---------------------
=
(5.13)  
Solving Equation 5.13 for  V  
out
gives
V
out
i
out
R
F
V
in
+
=
(5.14)  
Applying KCL at node C gives
i
in
i
out
= –
(5.15)  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested