431
C H A P T E R
10 
Actuators 
T
his chapter describes various actuators important in mechatronic system 
design. 
INPUT SIGNAL
CONDITIONING
AND INTERFACING
- discrete circuits 
- amplifiers
- filters
- A/D, D/D
OUTPUT SIGNAL
CONDITIONING
AND INTERFACING
- D/A, D/D
PWM
- power transistors
- power op amps
GRAPHICAL
DISPLAYS
- LEDs
- digital displays
- LCD
- CRT
SENSORS
- switches
- potentiometer
- photoelectrics
- digital encoder
- strain gage
- thermocouple
- accelerometer
- MEMs 
ACTUATORS
solenoids, voice coils
DC motors
stepper motors
servo motors
hydraulics, pneumatics
MECHANICAL SYSTEM
system model
dynamic response
DIGITAL CONTROL
ARCHITECTURES
- logic circuits
- microcontroller
- SBC
- PLC
- sequencing and timing
- logic and arithmetic
- control algorithms
- communication
amplifiers
CHAPTER OBJECTIVES 
After you read, discuss, study, and apply ideas in this chapter, you will:  
1.  Be able to identify different classes of actuators, including solenoids, DC 
motors, AC motors, hydraulics, and pneumatics 
2.  Understand the differences between series, shunt, compound, permanent mag-
net, and stepper DC motors 
3.  Understand how to design electronics to control a stepper motor 
Error processing SSI file
I
n
t
e
r
n
e
t
L
i
n
k
10.1Actuator 
online resources 
and vendors
432 
CHAPTER 10 
Actuators
4.  Be able to select a motor for a mechatronics application 
5.  Be able to identify and describe the components used in hydraulic and 
pneumatic systems   
10.1 INTRODUCTION 
Most mechatronic systems involve motion or action of some sort. This motion or 
action can be applied to anything from a single atom to a large articulated struc-
Actuators  are the devices used to produce this motion or action. 
Up to this point in the book, we have focused on electronic components and 
produce a specific mechanical action or action sequence. Sensor input measures 
ho
helps regulate the specific action, and much of the electronics we learned about is 
cal changes such as linear and angular displacement. They also modulate the rate 
and po
tem design is selecting the appropriate type of actuator. This chapter covers some 
of the most important actuators: solenoids, electric motors, hydraulic cylinders and 
rotary motors, and pneumatic cylinders. Putting it poetically, this chapter is “where 
the rubber meets the road.” Internet Link 10.1 provides links to vendors and online 
resources for various commercially available actuators and support equipment. 
10.2 ELECTROMAGNETIC PRINCIPLES 
Man
carrying conductor is moved in a magnetic field, a force is produced in a direc-
tion perpendicular to the current and magnetic field directions.  Lorentz’s force law,  
xternal 
magnetic field, in vector form is
F
×B
=
(10.1)   
where F
is the force vector (per unit length of conductor), I
is the current vector, 
and      B
is the magnetic field vector.  Figure 10.1  illustrates the relationship between 
these vectors and indicates the  right-hand rule  analogy, which states that if your 
right-hand index finger points in the direction of the current and your middle finger 
is aligned with the field direction, then your extended thumb (perpendicular to the 
index and middle fingers) will point in the direction of the force. Another way to 
apply the right-hand rule is to align your extended fingers in the direction of the I
vector and orient your palm so you can curl (flex) your fingers toward the direction 
of the      B
vector. Your hand will then be positioned such that your extended thumb 
points in the direction of F
Error processing SSI file
Figure 10.1 Right-hand rule for magnetic force.
F
I
B
extended right hand
index finger
direction
extended
right hand thumb
direction
flexed right hand
middle finger
direction
10.3 Solenoids and Relays 
433
Another electromagnetic effect important to actuator design is field intensifica-
w hundred 
times that of air; therefore, a coil wound around an iron core can produce a magnetic 
flux a fe
de
ed par-
experience changing magnetic fields. Eddy currents, which are a result of Faraday’s 
law of induction, result in inefficiencies and undesirable core heating.   
10.3 SOLENOIDS AND RELAYS 
As illustrated in  Figure 10.2 , a  solenoid  consists of a coil and a movable iron core 
called the  armature.  When the coil is energized with current, the core moves to 
vable core 
is usually spring-loaded to allow the core to retract when the current is switched off. 
invx-
pensive, and their use is limited primarily to on-off applications such as latching, 
locking, and triggering. They are frequently used in home appliances (e.g., washing 
machine valv
machines (e.g., plungers and bumpers), and factory automation. Video Demos 10.1 
through 10.3 show examples of interesting student projects using solenoids in cre-
ative ways. 
An electromechanical  relay  is a solenoid used to make or break mechanical con-
tact between electrical leads. A small voltage input to the solenoid controls a poten-
tially large current through the relay contacts. Applications include power switches 
power transistor switch circuit but has the capability to switch much larger currents. 
V
i
d
e
o
D
e
m
o
10.1Magic piano
10.2Automated 
melodica
10.3LED 
fountain system
Error processing SSI file
Figure 10.2 Solenoids.
(a)  plunger type
(b)  nonplunger type
movable
armature
core 
coil
stationary
iron core
spring
spring
434 
CHAPTER 10 
Actuators
Relays, because they create a mechanical connection and don’t require voltage bias-
ing, can be used to switch either DC or AC power. Also, the input circuit of a relay 
is electrically isolated from the output circuit, unlike the common-emitter transistor 
the relay is electrically isolated, noise, induced voltages, and ground faults occur-
ring in the output circuit have minimal impact on the input circuit. One disadvan-
tage of relays is that they have slower switching times than transistors. And because 
they contain contacts and mechanical components, they wear out much faster. Video 
Demo 10.4 demonstrates how relays and transistors respond to different switching 
speeds. 
As illustrated in  Figure 10.3 , a  voice coil  consists of a coil that moves in a 
magnetic field produced by a permanent magnet and intensified by an iron core. 
Figure 10.4  shows the coil and iron core of a commercially available voice coil, 
which can be used as either a sensor or an actuator. When used as an actuator, the 
attached to a movable load such as the diaphragm of an audio speaker, the spool of 
a hydraulic proportional valve, or the read-write head of a computer disk drive. The 
linear response, small mass of the moving coil, and bidirectional capability make 
voice coils more attractive than solenoids for control applications. 
Video Demos 10.5 and 10.6 show how a computer disk drive functions, where a 
voice coil is used to provide the pivoting motion of the read-write head. Video Demo 
10.7 shows a super-slow-motion clip, filmed with a special high-speed camera, 
which dramatically demonstrates the accuracy and speed of the voice coil motion. 
The read-write head comes to a complete stop on one track before moving to another. 
In real-time (e.g., in Video Demo 10.6), this motion is a total blur. 
V
i
d
e
o
D
e
m
o
10.4Relay 
and transistor 
switching circuit 
comparison
10.5Computer 
hard-drive with 
voice coil
10.6Computer 
hard-drive 
track seeking 
demonstration
10.7Computer 
hard-drive super-
slow-motion video 
of track finding
Figure 10.3 Voice coil.
movable
coil
stationary
iron core
permanent
magnet
N
S
Error processing SSI file
10.4 ELECTRIC MOTORS 
Electric motors are by far the most ubiquitous of the actuators, occurring in virtually 
all electromechanical systems. Electric motors can be classified either by function or 
by electrical configuration. In the functional classification, motors are given names 
suggesting how the motor is to be used. Examples of functional classifications 
include torque, gear, servo, instrument servo, and stepping. However, it is usually 
necessary to know something about the electrical design of the motor to make judg-
ments about its application for delivering power and controlling position.  Figure 10.5  
provides a configuration classification of electrical motors found in mechatronics 
applications. The differences are due to motor winding and rotor designs, resulting 
in a large v
motors continues to improve, making them important additions to all sorts of mecha-
tronic systems from appliances to automobiles. AC induction motors are particularly 
important in industrial and large consumer appliance applications. In fact, the AC 
induction motor is sometimes called the workhorse of industry. Video Demos 10.8 
through 10.10 show some examples and describe how the motors function. 
V
i
d
e
o
D
e
m
o
10.8AC 
induction motor 
(single phase)
10.9AC 
induction motor 
with a soft start for 
a water pump
10.10AC 
induction motor 
variable frequency 
drive for a building 
air handler unit
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM 10.1
Examples of Solenoids, Voice Coils, and Relays
Make a list of common household and automobile devices that contain solenoids, 
vas 
selected for each of the devices you cite.
Figure 10.4 Photograph of a voice coil iron core and coil.
10.4 Electric Motors 
435
Error processing SSI file
DC
motors
single
phase
induction
synchronous
shaded pole
hysteresis
reluctance
permanent magnet
polyphase
synchronous
universal motor
AC
motors
wound rotor
squirrel cage
induction
wound rotor
squirrel cage
brushed
brushless
permanent magnet
variable reluctance
series wound
shunt wound
compound wound
permanent magnet
variable reluctance
Figure 10.5 Configuration classification of electric motors.
436 
CHAPTER 10 
Actuators
Figure 10.6  illustrates the construction and components of a typical electric 
motor. The stationary outer housing, called the  stator,  supports radial magnetized 
field 
coils, 
vide radial magnetic fields. The iron core intensifies the magnetic field inside the coil 
due to its permeability. The purpose for laminating the core is to reduce the effects 
Item 10.2). The  rotor  is the part of the motor that rotates. It consists of a rotating 
armature  
windings, and an iron core that intensifies the fields created by the windings. There 
Figure 10.6 Motor construction and terminology.
stator
shaft/rotor
air gap
shaft
commutator
segment
laminated iron core pole
winding
bearing
rotor
stator (end view section)
winding
laminated
iron core
pole
rotor
Error processing SSI file
is a small  air gap  between the rotor and the stator where the magnetic fields interact. 
In many  DC motors,  the rotor also includes a  commutator  that delivers and con-
trols the direction of current through the armature windings. For motors with a com-
mutator,  “brushes”  provide stationary electrical contact to the moving commutator 
conducting segments. Brushes in early motors consisted of bristles of copper wire 
flexed against the commutator, hence the term brush; but now they are usually made 
of graphite, which provides a larger contact area and is self-lubricating. The brushes 
. Video 
Demo 10.11 shows a small, brushed, permanent-magnet DC motor disassembled so 
you can see the various components and how they function. 
 brushless  DC motor has permanent magnets on the rotor and a rotating field 
in the stator. The permanent magnets on the rotor eliminate the need for a commuta-
tor
sensors that are triggered as the shaft rotates. Video Demos 10.12 and 10.13 show 
two examples of brushless DC motors. One advantage of a brushless motor is that 
it does not require maintenance to replace worn brushes. Also, because there are no 
rotor windings or iron core, the rotor inertia is much smaller, sometimes making 
control easier
rotor windings and hence no  I2R  heating. Another advantage of not having brushes 
less motors create less EMI and are more suitable in environments where explosive 
gases might be present. One disadvantage of brushless motors is that they can cost 
more due to the sensors and control circuitry required. 
Figure 10.7  shows examples of commercially available assembled motors. In 
the top figure, the motor on the left is an AC induction motor with a gearhead speed 
reduction unit attached. The motor on the right is a two-phase stepper motor. Motors 
come in standard sizes with standard mounting brackets, and they usually include 
nameplates listing some of the motor’s specifications. The bottom figure shows the 
internal construction of a permanent-magnet-rotor stepper motor. Video Demo 10.14 
shows other examples of commercially available regular DC motors and stepper 
motors. 
V
i
d
e
o
D
e
m
o
10.11DC motor 
components
10.12Brushless 
DC motor from a 
computer fan
10.13Brushless 
DC motor gear 
pump
10.14DC and 
stepper motor 
examples
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM 10.2
Eddy Currents
xpe-
riencing a changing magnetic field. The iron core in a motor rotor is usually lami-
nated. Explain why. What is the best orientation for the laminations?
T
fields and armature currents or stator fields and armature fields. We illustrate both 
principles starting with the first.  Figure 10.8  illustrates a DC motor with six armature 
windings. The direction of current flow in the windings is illustrated in the figure. 
10.4 Electric Motors 
437
Error processing SSI file
438 
CHAPTER 10 
Actuators
As a result of  Equation 10.1 , the interaction of the fixed stator field and the currents 
ou 
can v-
rent and stator field directions. To maintain the torque as the rotor rotates, the spatial 
arrangement of the armature currents relative to the stator field must remain fixed. 
Figure 10.7 Examples of commercial motors. (Courtesy of Oriental Motor, 
Torrance, CA)
(a) AC induction and stepper motor
(b) exploded view of stepper motor with a
permanent magnet rotor
Case
Flange
Stator
Rotor
Bracket
Figure 10.8 Electric motor field-current interaction.
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
stator
stator
stator field
stator field
current out
current in
torque
rotor
armature
windings
armature
field
Error processing SSI file
in the correct sequence as the rotor turns. 
Figure 10.9  illustrates an example commutator. It consists of a ring of alternat-
ing conductive and insulating materials connected to the rotor windings. Current is 
directed through the windings via the brushes, which slide on the surface of the com-
mutator as it rotates. In the position shown, the current flows through windings  A, 
B,  and  C  in the clockwise direction and through  F, E,  and  D  in the counterclockwise 
direction. 
shown, the currents in windings  C  and  F  switch directions. As the brushes slide over 
the rotating commutator, this process continues in sequence. With appropriate wind-
ing conf
currents relative to the fixed stator fields. This continually maintains the torque in the 
desired direction. 
-
action of stator and rotor magnetic fields. The torque is produced by the fact that 
like field poles attract and unlike poles repel.  Figure 10.10  illustrates this principle 
of operation with a simple two-pole DC motor. The stator poles generate fixed mag-
netic f
rotor is commutated to cause changes in direction of its magnetic field. The interac-
tion of the changing rotor field and the fixed stator fields produce a torque on the 
shaft, causing rotation. With the rotor in position  i,  the right brush contacts commu-
tator segment  A  and the left brush contacts segment  B,  creating a current in the rotor 
winding, resulting in the magnetic poles as shown. The rotor magnetic poles oppose 
In position  ii,  the stator poles both oppose and attract the rotor poles to enhance 
the clockwise rotation. Between positions  iii  and  v  the commutator contacts switch, 
field. In position  iv,  both brushes temporarily lose contact with the commutator, but 
Figure 10.9 Electric motor six-winding commutator.
A
B
C
D
E
F
armature
windings
I
in
I
out
brush
conductor
insulator
10.4 Electric Motors 
439
Error processing SSI file
Figure 10.10 Electric motor field-field interaction.
+
stator
N
S
A
B
commutator
segment
brush
stator
pole
torque
(i)
N
S
A
B
N
S
(iii)
N
S
A
B
N
S
A
B
(iv)
N
S
(v)
N
S
B
A
S
N
(ii)
N
S
A
B
N
S
V
i
d
e
o
D
e
m
o
10.11DC motor 
components
440 
CHAPTER 10 
Actuators
the rotor continues to move due to its momentum. In position  v  reversed magnetic 
field in the rotor again opposes the stator field, continuing the clockwise torque and 
motion. 
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM 10.3
Field-Field Interaction in a Motor
Does the armature field in Figure 10.8 have any effect on the torque produced by 
the motor?
A problem with the simple two-pole design illustrated in  Figure 10.10  is that 
starting would not occur if the motor happens to be in position iv, where the brushes 
are located over the commutator gaps. This problem can be avoided by designing the 
motor with more poles and more commutator segments with overlapping switching. 
This allows the brushes to always contact two active segments, even while switching 
(see Video Demo 10.11 and Class Discussion Item 10.4). 
Error processing SSI file
Error processing SSI file