to opposite ends of the cylinder, applying or venting pressure on opposite sides of 
the piston. In position 1, the cylinder does not move, because the pressure is vented 
to the tank. In position 2, the cylinder moves to the right, since pressure is applied to 
the left side of the piston. In position 3, the cylinder moves to the left, because pres-
sure is applied to the right side of the piston. 
Common types of fixed position valves are check valves, poppet valves, spool 
valves, and rotary valves.  Figure 10.41  illustrates check and poppet valves. The 
check valve  allows flow in one direction only. The  poppet valve  is a check valve 
that can be forced open to allow reverse flow. 
As illustrated in  Figure 10.42 , a  spool valve  consists of a cylindrical spool with 
multiple lobes moving within a cylindrical casing containing multiple ports. The spool 
can be moved back and forth to align spaces between the spool lobes with input and 
output ports in the housing to direct high-pressure flow to different conduits in the sys-
opposing internal faces of the lobes. Therefore, no force is required to hold a position. 
In the left position, port A is pressurized, and port B is vented to the tank; and in the 
right position, port B is pressurized and port A is vented. To move the spool between 
ver, to over-
w. 
In the design of a spool valve where large hydrodynamic forces occur, a  pilot 
valve  is added, as shown in  Figure 10.43 . The pilot valve operates at a lower pres-
sure, called  pilot pressure,  and at much lower flow rates and therefore requires less 
force to actuate. The pilot valve directs pilot pressure to one side of the main spool, 
and the force generated by the pressure acting over the main spool lobe face is large 
enough to actuate the main valve. The effect of the pilot valve is to amplify force 
provided by the solenoid or mechanical lever acting on the pilot spool. In the figure, 
Figure 10.40 Double-acting hydraulic cylinder.
P
T
A
B
piston
4/3
valve
Figure 10.41 Check and poppet valves.
(a)  check valve
(b poppet valve
flow
no flow
ball
light spring
seat
up-down plunger
no flow
unless
plunger is
down
flow
10.8 Hydraulics 
471
Convert pdf pages to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpg batch; convert pdf document to jpg
Convert pdf pages to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf to jpeg
Figure 10.42 Spool valve.
(a) schematic
T A A P
P
TA
left position (P-A, B-T)
right position (A-T, P-B)
force
spool
lobe
casing
B T
B T
SEALED WET ARMATURE SOLENOIDS
Maximum protection against moisture,
corrosion and dirt. 
OPERATOR PROTECTION
High temperature elements are
isolated from direct contact. 
2 WIRE LEAD
50/60 Hz coils standard for
increased application flexibility. 
INTERCHANGEABLE SPOOLS
Provide easy field maintenance.
No matching of parts. 
LOW-PRESSURE DROPS
Reduces heat load and
increases efficiency.
SPOOL U GROOVES
Improves contamination tolerance of 
spools over conventional V grooves.
Significantly reduces spool hang up
resulting  in loss of production.
STANDARD
MOUNTINGS
Conforms to NFPA and
ANSI/ISO standards.  
(b) actual
(Courtesy of Continental Hydraulics, Savage, MN) 
Figure 10.43 Pilot-operated spool valve.
P
B
A
T
T
solenoid-
operated
pilot spool
T
T
pilot
press.
pilot valve
main spool
472 
CHAPTER 10 
Actuators
left side of the main spool and venting fluid from the right side of the main spool to 
tank, thus dri
to port B and vents port A. Video Demo 10.24 illustrates how a pilot valve can be 
used to create an amplified hydraulic force. 
The discussion of spool valves so far has been limited to operation between 
two positions only: on and off. Continuous operation can be achieved by using a 
proportional valve,  one whose spool moves a distance proportional to a mechanical 
V
i
d
e
o
D
e
m
o
10.24Pilot valve 
hydraulic amplifier 
cut-away
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
c# pdf to jpg; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code convert TIFF file all pages to jpg images.
convert pdf into jpg format; convert multiple pdf to jpg
or electrical input (e.g., a lever or an adjustable-current solenoid), thus changing the 
rate of flow and varying the speed and force of the actuator. When the spool position 
is controlled by electrical solenoids, the proportional valve is called an  electrohy-
draulic valve.  These valves may be used in open-loop control situations with no 
feedback, but they often include sensors to monitor spool position or actuator output. 
Proportional valves equipped with sensor and control circuitry are often called  servo 
valves.  Electrohydraulic valves are often pilot operated where the solenoids drive the 
can be driv
iers 
linked to analog or digital controllers.  
10.8.2 Hydraulic Actuators 
The most common hydraulic actuator is a simple  cylinder  with a piston driven by 
the pressurized fluid. As illustrated in  Figure 10.44 , a cylinder can be  single acting,  
where it is driven to and held in one position by pressure and returned to the other 
position by a spring or by the weight of the load, or  double acting,  where pressure 
is used to drive the piston in both directions. As illustrated in  Figure 10.45 , the linear 
actuator can be very versatile in achieving a variety of motions. Cylinder motion in 
the hydraulic elevator drives the elevator directly. The scissor jack converts small 
linear motion in the horizontal direction to larger linear motion in the vertical direc-
tion. Linear motion of the cylinder in the crane results in rotary motion of its pivoted 
boom. 
Rotary motion can also be achieved with hydraulic systems directly with a 
rotary actuator. One type of rotary actuator, called a  gear motor,  is simply a gear 
pump (see  Figure 10.35 ) driven in reverse where pressure is applied, resulting in 
rotation of a shaft. 
Figure 10.44 Single-acting and double-acting cylinders.
double-acting cylinder
A
B
single-acting cylinder
A
hydraulic elevator
scissor jack
“cherry picker” crane
Figure 10.45 Example mechanisms driven by a hydraulic cylinder.
10.8 Hydraulics 
473
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert from pdf to jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi; convert pdf picture to jpg
474 
CHAPTER 10 
Actuators
Hydraulic systems have the advantage of generating extremely large forces from 
very compact actuators. They also can provide precise control at low speeds and 
have built-in travel limits defined by the cylinder stroke. The drawbacks of hydraulic 
systems include the need for a large infrastructure (high-pressure pump, tank, and 
distribviron-
an-
tages, electric motor drives are often the preferred choice. However, in large systems, 
which require extremely large forces, hydraulics often provide the only alternative. 
For more information, Internet Link 10.9 provides links to online resources and 
manufacturers of hydraulic components and systems. 
10.9 PNEUMATICS 
Pneumatic systems are similar to hydraulic systems, but they use compressed air as 
the w
tem are illustrated in  Figure 10.46 . A compressor is used to provide pressurized air, 
usually on the order of 70 to 150 psi (482 kPA to 1.03 MPa), which is much lower 
than hydraulic system pressures. As a result of the lower operating pressures, pneu-
matic actuators generate much lower forces than hydraulic actuators. 
After the inlet air is compressed, excess moisture and heat are removed from 
the air with an air treatment unit (see  Figure 10.46 ). Unlike hydraulic pumps, which 
provide positive displacement of fluid at high pressure on demand, compressors can-
not provide high volume of pressurized air responsively; therefore, a large volume of 
high-pressure compressed air is stored in a reservoir or tank. The working pressure 
delivered to the system can be controlled by a pressure regulator to be much lower 
than the reservoir pressure. The reservoir is equipped with a pressure-sensitive switch 
that activates the compressor when the pressure starts to fall below the desired level. 
Control valves and actuators act in much the same way as in hydraulic systems, 
but instead of returning fluid to a tank, the air is simply returned (exhausted) to the 
atmosphere. Pneumatic systems are open systems, always processing new air, and 
hydraulic systems are closed systems, always recirculating the same oil. This elimi-
nates the need for a network of return lines in pneumatic systems. Another advantage 
ve the 
self-lubricating features of hydraulic oil. 
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM 10.8
Force Generated by a Double-Acting Cylinder
For a given system pressure, is the force generated by a double-acting cylinder dif-
ferent depending on the direction of actuation? How is the force determined for 
each direction of motion?
I
n
t
e
r
n
e
t
L
i
n
k
10.9Hydraulic
Valves.org 
(valve, pump, 
motor, cylinder 
manufactures and 
information)
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
convert pdf file to jpg online; batch pdf to jpg online
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
convert pdf to jpg c#; convert pdf to jpg file
When sources of compressed air are readily available, as they often are in 
engineering-related facilities, pneumatic actuators may be a good choice. Double-
acting or single-acting pneumatic cylinders are ideal for providing low-force linear 
motion between two well-defined endpoints. Since air is compressible, pneumatic 
c
the endpoints, especially in the presence of a varying load. Video Demo 10.25 dem-
onstrates various types of pneumatic cylinders, and Video Demo 10.26 shows an 
interesting example of an apparatus driven by a pneumatic system. 
Another advantage of pneumatic systems is the possibility of replacing the 
infrastructure with a high-pressure storage tank and regulator. The tank serves a 
function analogous to a battery in an electrical system. This makes possible light, 
mobile pneumatic systems (e.g., a pneumatically actuated walking robot). In these 
QUESTIONS AND EXERCISES 
Section 10.3 Solenoids and Relays 
10.1.  
A solenoid can be modeled as an inductor in series with a resistor. Design a circuit 
to use a digital output to control a 24 V solenoid.    
Section 10.5 DC Motors 
10.2.  
Why can the presence of electric motors or solenoids affect the function of nearby 
electronic circuits?  
10.3.  
If a manufacturer’s specifications for a PM DC motor are as follows, what are the 
motor’s no-load speed, stall current, starting torque, and maximum power for an 
applied voltage of 10 V?
■ 
Torque constant  =  0.12 Nm/A  
■ 
Electrical constant  =  12 V/1000 RPM  
■ 
Armature resistance  =  1.5      
filter
motor
compressor
control
valve
cylinder
P A
R B
infrastructure
exhaust
air
inlet
air
treatment
on/off control
reservoir
pressure
regulator
Figure 10.46 Pneumatic system components.
V
i
d
e
o
D
e
m
o
10.25Pneumatic 
cylinders of various 
types and sizes
10.26Pneumatic 
biomechanics 
exercise apparatus 
overview
10.9 Pneumatics 
475
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. C# class source codes and online demos are provided for .NET.
convert pdf to gif or jpg; change pdf to jpg online
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
convert pdf file to jpg; convert pdf to jpg converter
476 
CHAPTER 10 
Actuators
10.4.  
Recognizing that the H-bridge IC in Design  Example 10.1  includes a current sense 
output, draw the block diagram for torque control of a brushed DC motor using the 
of current for each amp that is output to the motor. Convert this output to a voltage 
and use it as the input to a PWM chip like the LM3524D. Include a torque adjust 
potentiometer on the LM3524D.)    
Section 10.6 Stepper Motors 
10.5.  
For the full-step drive circuit in  Figure 10.29 , complete the following timing dia-
gram by adding signals  B  
0
,  B  
1
,  φ  
1
,  φ  
2
,  φ  
3
, and  φ  
4
. Using  Table 10.1 , verify that the 
intended motion results.
RESET
STEP
CW/CCW
10.6.  
Document a complete and thorough answer to Class Discussion Item 10.5.  
10.7.  
A unipolar stepper motor full-step drive circuit is available as a single component 
from some manufacturers. Explore the Internet to find a stepper motor driver, show a 
labeled pin-out diagram, and indicate how to connect it to a stepper motor properly.  
10.8.  
A designer wishes to use a stepper motor coupled to a gearbox to drive an indexed 
conveyor belt to achieve a linear resolution of 1 mm and a maximum speed of 10 
veyor 
is driv
ould be 
required to achieve the maximum speed at this resolution?    
Section 10.7 Selecting a Motor 
10.9.  
For each of the following applications, what is a good choice for the type of electric 
motor used? Justify your choice.
a. robot arm joint  
b. ceiling fan  
c. electric trolley  
d. circular saw  
e. NC milling machine  
f. electric crane  
g. disk drive head actuator  
h. disk drive motor  
i. windshield wiper motor  
j. industrial conveyor motor  
k. washing machine  
l. clothes dryer     
10.10.  
moments of inertia of the rotor and load are  J  
r 
and  J  
l 
, the gearbox has a  N:M  reduc-
tion (where  N  >  M ) from the motor to the load, the motor has a starting torque  T  
s 
and a no-load speed    
max
, and the load torque is proportional to its speed ( T  
l 
  k   ),
a.  
b. What is the steady state speed of the motor and the load?  
c. How long will it take for the system to reach 95% of its steady state speed?       
Section 10.8 Hydraulics 
10.11.  
Document a complete and thorough answer to Class Discussion Item 10.8.  
10.12.  
What is the maximum force a 1 inch inner diameter single acting hydraulic cylinder 
can generate with a fluid pressure of 1000 psi?  
10.13.  
If a machine requires that a 1 cm inner diameter single-acting hydraulic cylinder 
a?    
Section 10.9 Pneumatics 
10.14.  
You are designing a pneumatic system that requires use of a pneumatic valve. 
On the Internet, find the specifications for a pneumatic valve capable of handling 
100 psi, and draw a schematic showing how you would interface it to a digital 
system.  
10.15.  
You are designing a pneumatic actuator using a dual-acting cylinder to produce 
required in the system in block diagram form. Be as specific as possible about 
component specifications.     
BIBLIOGRAPHY 
Kenjo ,  T.   ,   Electric Motors and Their Controls,   Oxford Science Publications, Oxford, 
England,  1994 . 
Khol ,  R.   , editor,  “Electrical & Electronics Reference Issue,”    Machine Design,   v. 57, n. 12, 
May 30,  1985 . 
McPherson ,  G.   ,   An Introduction to Electrical Machines and Transformers,   John Wiley, New 
York,  1981 . 
National Semiconductor Corporation,  “National Power ICs Databook,”  2900    Semiconductor 
Drive ,  P.O.    Box 58090,    Santa Clara ,  CA    95052. 
Norton ,  R. L.   ,   Design of Machinery,   3rd ed., McGraw-Hill, New York,  2003 . 
Shultz ,  G. P.   ,   Transformers and Motors,    Macmillan , Carmel, IN,  1989 . 
Westbrook ,  M. H.    and    Turner ,  J. D.   ,   Automotive Sensors,    Institute of Physics Publishing , 
Philadelphia,  1994 . 
Williamson ,  L.   ,  “What You Always Wanted to Know About Solenoids,”    Hydraulics and 
Pneumatics,   September,  1980     . 
Bibliography  
477
478
Mechatronic Systems—
Control Architectures 
and Case Studies 
T
his chapter provides a summary of mechatronic system digital control archi-
studies of mechatronic system design. ■ 
INPUT SIGNAL
CONDITIONING
AND INTERFACING
- discrete circuits 
- amplifiers
- filters
- A/D, D/D
OUTPUT SIGNAL
CONDITIONING
AND INTERFACING
- D/A, D/D
- PWM
- power transistors
- power op amps
GRAPHICAL
DISPLAYS
- LEDs
- digital displays
- LCD
- CRT
SENSORS
- switches
- potentiometer
- photoelectrics
- digital encoder
- strain gage
- thermocouple
- accelerometer
- MEMs 
ACTUATORS
- solenoids, voice coils
- DC motors
- stepper motors
- servo motors
- hydraulics, pneumatics
MECHANICAL SYSTEM
- system model
- dynamic response
DIGITAL CONTROL
ARCHITECTURES
logic circuits
microcontroller
SBC
PLC
sequencing and timing
logic and arithmetic
control algorithms
communication
- amplifiers
CHAPTER OBJECTIVES 
After you read, discuss, study, and apply ideas in this chapter, you will:  
1.  Know why many engineering designs today can be classified as mechatronic 
systems 
2.  Be aware of the various types of control architectures possible in mechatronic 
system design 
C H A P T E R  
11 
11.2 Control Architectures  
479
3.  Understand the basic principles of feedback control systems 
4.  Appreciate the variety of designs that can result from limited specifications of 
a mechatronic system 
5.  
using ladder logic 
6.  Recognize that many aerospace, automotive, and consumer products are 
mechatronic systems   
11.1 INTRODUCTION 
In the previous chapters of this book, we developed the foundations for the integra-
tion of mechanical devices, sensors, and signal and power electronics into mecha-
challenging mechatronic design examples to help you connect the theory and 
analysis with actual applications to expand your knowledge and design skills. To 
obtain completeness in the integration of mechanical devices, sensors, and sig-
nal and power electronics into the most advanced mechatronic systems, we must 
include microprocessor-based control systems. Chapter 7 presented the basics of 
microcontroller programming and interfacing. Here, we briefly introduce other con-
arm, an articulated walking machine for movement in unusual environments, and a 
coin counter. These projects have been used as mechatronic projects in coursework 
at Colorado State University. To provide a final perspective, we list examples of 
mechatronic systems in many industries.   
11.2 CONTROL ARCHITECTURES 
Many mechatronic systems have multiple inputs and outputs related by determinis-
loop control to complex feedback control. Implementation of the control can be as 
simple as using a single op amp or as complicated as programming massively paral-
may consider in the design of a mechatronic system.  
11.2.1 Analog Circuits 
Many simple mechatronic designs require a specific actuator output based on an 
amps and transistors can be employed to effect the desired control. Op amps can be 
subtraction, integration, and differentiation. They can also be used in amplifiers for 
480 
CHAPTER 11 
Mechatronic Systems—Control Architectures and Case Studies
implement and can be less expensive than microprocessor-based systems.  
11.2.2 Digital Circuits 
If the input signals are digital or can be converted to a finite set of states, then com-
design. The simplest designs use a few digital chips to create a digital controller. To 
generate complex Boolean functions on a single IC, specialized digital devices such 
as  programmable array logic (PAL)  controllers and  programmable logic arrays 
(PLAs)  can be used to reduce design complexity. PALs and PLAs contain many 
gates and a gridwork of conductors that can be custom connected using a program-
ming device. Once programmed, the ICs implement the designed Boolean function 
between the inputs and outputs. PALs and PLAs may offer an alternative to complex 
sequential and combinational logic circuits that require many ICs. 
Another type of programmable logic-gate-based device is the  field-
programmable gate array (FPGA).  Like PALs and PLAs, an FPGA contains a 
large number of reconfigurable gates that can be programmed to create a wide range 
of logic functions. FPGAs are different from PALs and PLAs because they also can 
include memory, I/O ports, arithmetic functions, and other functionality found in 
vel 
software language (e.g., VHDL) that allows for fairly sophisticated functionality. 
Video Demo 11.1 shows an example of an FPGA development system used to con-
trol a simple device. 
Sometimes, it may be economically feasible to design an  application-specific 
integrated circuit (ASIC)  that provides unique functionality on a single IC. Logic 
functions, memory, computation, signal processing, and other digital and analog fea-
tures can be custom built onto a single ASIC. Design and setup for manufacturing 
can be expensive, but in high-volume manufacturing applications, an ASIC solution 
can be cheaper in the long run. ASICs are also attractive because the integrated solu-
tion will usually be smaller in size and consume less power.  
11.2.3 Programmable Logic Controller 
Programmable logic controllers (PLCs)  are specialized industrial devices for 
interfacing to and controlling analog and digital devices. They are designed with 
y are usu-
ally programmed with  ladder logic,  which is a graphical method of laying out the 
connecti
industrial control and industrial environments specifically in mind. Therefore, in 
addition to being flexible and easy to program, they are robust and relatively immune 
to external interference.     
The symbols, notation, and basic constructs used to define and create ladder 
logic diagrams are shown in  Figure 11.1 . Programming a PLC is a simple matter of 
constructing a diagram like this by interactively dragging and dropping components 
in a graphical user interface provided by the manufacturers. Referring to the figure, 
V
i
d
e
o
D
e
m
o
11.1Table 
tennis assistant 
controlled by an 
FPGA
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested