11.5 Case Study 2—Mechatronic Design of a Coin Counter 
511
When this project was assigned, we had not yet started teaching microcontroller 
programming and interfacing in our course. In lieu of this, we had students develop 
value corresponding to the denomination. There were as many solutions for this 
problem as there were design groups.  Figures 11.26  and  11.27  display two student 
transmitted to a digital display driver to multiplex the current number of coins and 
the accumulated value. 
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM 11.2 
Coin Counter Circuits 
Figure 11.26  shows the coin counter electrical schematic from a student group 
report. The design uses one-shots to latch the value corresponding to the coin and 
adds that value to the previous sum. There are mistakes in the input portion of the 
first half of the circuit used to determine whether the coin is a penny, nickel, or 
quarter
timing diagrams shown in  Figure 11.25 , convince yourself that the logic circuit will 
not identify the coin correctly. 
Even if the logic were correct, the design could still have problems due to tim-
ing because the one-shot pulse lengths are fixed but the sensor pulse widths depend 
on how fast the coin rolls past. A sequential logic circuit that would unequivocally 
identify the coin as a penny, nickel, or quarter follows. Draw a timing diagram that 
supports the argument that this sequential logic circuit is a robust design. Include 
signals  S  
low
(low sensor),  S  
middle
(middle sensor),  S  
high
(high sensor),  B,   C,   L,   R,   X,   Y,  
and  Z  in your diagram. Refer to  Figure 11.25  for the phototransistor sensor signal 
timing for each type of coin. 
C
B
L
R
Y (nickel)
Z (penny)
X (quarter)
S
high
S
middle
S
low
1
D
Q
CK
CLR
D
Q
Q
Q
CK
CLR
1
one-shot
one-shot
Batch pdf to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
pdf to jpeg; change file from pdf to jpg on
Batch pdf to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf image to jpg image; convert pdf to jpg c#
Figure 11.26 Counter design 1. 
(a) first half of circuit
512 
CHAPTER 11 
Mechatronic Systems—Control Architectures and Case Studies
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
change pdf file to jpg file; best convert pdf to jpg
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
speed JPEG to GIF Converter, faster than other JPG Converters; when you convert the files in batch; Storing conversion so the user who is not online still can
changing pdf to jpg; conversion pdf to jpg
(b) second half of circuit
Figure 11.26 (continued) 
11.5 Case Study 2—Mechatronic Design of a Coin Counter 
513
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Open JPEG to DICOM Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "DICOM" in
convert pdf to jpg for online; convert pdf file into jpg format
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Ability to preserve original images without any affecting; Ability to convert image swiftly between JPG & JBIG2 in single and batch mode;
convert pdf file to jpg file; convert pdf into jpg format
Figure 11.27 Counter design 2. 
(a) first half of circuit
514 
CHAPTER 11 
Mechatronic Systems—Control Architectures and Case Studies
JPG to Word Converter | Convert JPEG to Word, Convert Word to JPG
Open JPEG to Word Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "Word" in
change format from pdf to jpg; convert pdf images to jpg
JPG to JPEG2000 Converter | Convert JPEG to JPEG2000, Convert
Open JPEG to JPEG2000 Converter first; ad JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JPEG2000" in
convert pdf document to jpg; .net pdf to jpg
(b) second half of circuit
Figure 11.27 (continued )
11.5 Case Study 2—Mechatronic Design of a Coin Counter 
515
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "PNG" in "Output
pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg format
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
VB.NET > Convert PDF to Image. "This online guide content end users to convert PDF and PDF/A documents used commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap
conversion pdf to jpg; convert online pdf to jpg
516 
CHAPTER 11 
Mechatronic Systems—Control Architectures and Case Studies
11.6  CASE STUDY 3—MECHATRONIC 
DESIGN OF A ROBOTIC 
WALKING MACHINE 
walking machine. It was executed by undergraduate engineering students in 1994, 
follo
book is used. In 1987, the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) began sponsor-
ing an annual Robotic Walking Machine Decathlon, pitting teams from different 
universities in a challenge to design articulated walking machines that could execute 
10 different performance events including a dash, a slalom, obstacle avoidance, and 
crossing a crevasse. Half of the events included walking motion and obstacle avoid-
an electrical umbilical to the machine. The other half of the events required auton-
omous control via onboard, preprogrammed systems with no human intervention. 
Over the years we have seen scores of different walking machine designs, some very 
simple and capable of completing just a few events, and others of great sophistica-
tion and creativity capable of completing all events. The excitement and fun of such 
fications. Our intent here is not to examine the varieties of walking machines but to 
focus on a specific design example to illustrate the mechatronic aspects. We begin 
by displaying three different walking machines, all of which won the national SAE 
contest (see  Figure 11.28 ). 
We now present as a case study the design of the 1994 Colorado State walk-
ing machine that the students, applying their ever-present wit, named  Airratic.  This 
design was a refinement of the first pneumatic design from 1992, which was a dra-
matic break from the evolving electromechanical designs of the previous seven years. 
With the air-powered designs, the students had to contend with a whole new set of 
design constraints: providing an onboard source of stored, pressurized air; control-
ling the mechanical motion of the articulated legs with pneumatic cylinders; distrib-
alking 
motion to sets of computer commands; interfacing a computer to the pneumatic con-
the system, including sensors on the machine for obstacle avoidance; and making the 
Because the designers elected to power the walking machine pneumatically, an 
onboard fiber-wound pressure tank was selected as the energy source for the stra-
tegically placed pneumatic pistons that controlled the position and movements of 
the legs. As shown in  Figure 11.29 , the skeletal structure of the walking machine 
consisted of welded aluminum members with 16 double-acting pneumatic cylinders. 
The four corner legs have 3 degrees of freedom, and the front and rear-center legs 
have 2 degrees of freedom. The mechanical design of the six legs was such that 
control algorithms could easily produce forward, reverse, sidewise, and diagonal 
motion, as well as full-up and full-down motion of the main frame, by simple coor-
dinated control of the 16 cylinders. Each leg included an axial cylinder that could be 
(b) “Airachnid”—First pneumatic design (1992)
(a) “Lurch”—Scotch yoke mechanism leg design (1989)
Figure 11.28 Student-designed walking machines from Colorado State University. 
(c) “Airratic”—Refined pneumatic design (1994)
11.6 Case Study 3—Mechatronic Design of a Robotic Walking Machine 
517
extended or retracted. Ten other cylinders were arranged to position the legs in dif-
ferent patterns in the horizontal plane. 
Fgs at 
all times, requiring a total of six legs for locomotion. Most walking motions could be 
Figure 11.29 Aluminum frame and telescoping pneumatic legs. 
(a) side view
(b) front view
518 
CHAPTER 11 
Mechatronic Systems—Control Architectures and Case Studies
divided into the coordinated movement of two sets of three legs each, called Group 
1 Legs and Group 2 Legs.  Figure 11.30  displays the flowchart used to develop the 
control code for one class of coordinated motion: forward motion of the machine. 
The essence of the control system involves the coordination of 16 pneumatic 
cylinders using computer-controlled solenoid valves. Each solenoid valve switches 
air from the main cylinder to one side of the pneumatic cylinder and exhausts pres-
surized air from the other side, as shown in  Figure 11.31 . Needle valves were manu-
ally adjusted on each solenoid valve to govern cylinder actuating speed. 
The complexity of the flowchart in  Figure 11.30  warrants a microprocessor-
based solution. This and similar flowcharts for each motion command were very 
motion. The onboard computer controls the solenoid valves via 74373 tristate invert-
ing buffer interface chips receiving signals from an 8-bit port on the computer. As 
shown in  Figure 11.32 , the 8-bit port is multiplexed to provide 18 bits of information 
for coordinated control of the cylinders. 
The controller selected was a Motorola 68HC811E2 EVM 8-bit microprocessor-
based single-board computer. It has 128 K of RAM, and 64 K acts as pseudo-ROM 
for downloading control programs from an external PC or laptop computer. Thirty 
I/O bits are provided and expanded via multiplexing to the 48 bits required for the 
control of all of the components of the machine. Computer code was created on a 
laptop computer in the high-level language C, then complied and downloaded to the 
Motorola EVM for testing. This provided a convenient development environment for 
testing and modifying the control strategies. 
In addition to various walking motions, the machine included sensor feedback 
using two optical retroreflective sensors. The sensors were mounted on a rotating 
platform to allow scanning a portion of the region in front of the machine. A digital 
Figure 11.30 Flowchart for forward motion routine. 
11.6 Case Study 3—Mechatronic Design of a Robotic Walking Machine 
519
encoder provided position information corresponding to the sense state of the two 
sensors. The sensor data was read from the I/O bus of the microprocessor, and soft-
ware control routines used the data to avoid obstacles. 
In summary, we examined an example of a student-designed mechatronic sys-
tem that received first place in the 1994 SAE Walking Machine Decathlon. It illus-
an onboard microcomputer for controlling the machine in both operator-controlled 
Figure 11.31 Pneumatic system. 
Figure 11.32 Computer ports and I/O board. 
520 
CHAPTER 11 
Mechatronic Systems—Control Architectures and Case Studies
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested