Figure A.1 Histogram of experimental data. 
f
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y
value
10
20
30
40
50
60
6
5
4
3
2
1
Table A.6 Set of experimental data
Index
Value
1
25.5
2
42.1
3
36.4
4
32.1
5
15.6
6
38.6
7
55.3
8
29.1
9
32.1
10
34.0
11
35.0
Figure A.2 Distributions of data. 
normal
bimodal
skewed
uniform
mean
mean
mean
mean
A.3 Statistics  
531
merged populations with two different means. The uniform distribution represents 
completely random data. 
Many data points are required to create a histogram. Statistics provides rules 
for distilling the histogram down to just a few numbers representing the characteris-
tics of the data set. The most important statistical measure is the  arithmetic mean,  
which is also called the  average  or simply the mean. Denoted by x      it is the sum of 
each of the data values  x  
i 
divided by the number of data points  N:  
x
x
i
1=
N
------------
=
(A.2)   
Convert multiple pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch pdf to jpg online; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
Convert multiple pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
reader convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg batch
532 
APPENDIX A 
Measurement Fundamentals
Other statistical measures that characterize a set of data are the  median,  which 
mode,  
which is the value that occurs most frequently; and the  geometric mean,  defined as 
the  N th root of the product of the values: 
GM
x
1
x
2
. . . x
N
N
=
(A.3)  
The geometric mean is more desirable than the arithmetic mean for averaging ratios 
since the reciprocal of the GM is equal to the GM of the reciprocals. 
For the set of data in  Table A.6 , the mean is 34.2, the median is 34.0, the mode 
is 32.1, and the geometric mean is 32.7. 
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM A.4 
Statistical Calculations 
V
data in  Table A.6 . 
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM A.5 
Your Class Age Histogram 
est being first. Now form a birth year histogram by assembling into rows according 
to birth year. Store the histogram data (year, frequency) for use in  Question A.2  at 
the end of the chapter.  
The spread or dispersion of a data set over its range is characterized by another 
statistical measure, known as the  variance,  defined by 
v
σ
2
x
i
–( x
)
2
1–
-------------------
1=
N
=
=
(A.4)  
where  x  
i 
is an individual measurement and  N  is the total number of measurements, 
called the  sample size  of the experiment. The  standard deviation   σ  also describes 
this distribution, but in the units of the individual measurements. It is defined as the 
square root of the variance: 
σ
v
x
i
–( x
)
2
1–
-------------------
1=
N
=
=
(A.5)   
The standard deviation estimates the magnitude of the spread of the experimen-
tal data around the mean value. A small standard deviation indicates that the data set 
has a narrow spread. 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
pdf to jpg converter; change from pdf to jpg
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
c# convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg format
A.4 Error Analysis 
533
A.4 ERROR ANALYSIS 
The process of making measurements is imperfect, and uncertainty will always be 
associated with measured values. It is important to recognize sources of error and 
estimate the magnitude of error when one makes a measurement. Usually a manu-
facturer defines the accuracy of an instrument in published specifications, but other 
factors come into play. 
 systematic error  is one that reoccurs in the same way each time a measurement 
cali-
bration,  where the measurement instrument is used to record values from a stan-
dard input and is adjusted to compensate for any discrepancy.  Random errors  occur 
due to the stochastic variations in a measurement process. Some of the statistical 
tools presented in the previous section enable us to reduce the effects of these errors. 
Blunders  occur when the engineer or scientist makes a mistake. Blunders can be 
avoided by careful design and review and through the use of methodical procedures. 
Figure A.3  illustrates systematic and random errors. The center of the target 
represents the desired value, and the shot pattern represents measured data. The 
systematic error, called inaccuracy, is associated with the shift of the shot pattern 
from the center of the target and could be corrected by improved sighting, known as 
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM A.6 
Relationship Between Standard Deviation and Sample Size 
The denominator in  Equation A.5  is often confusing since one might assume it to 
be  N,  providing a value known as the  root mean square  (rms). Why is the denomi-
nator ( N   -  1) and not  N?  Consider the situation where there is only one sample 
N   =  1). Also, consider how many data values  x  
i 
must be specified to define the 
entire data set if the mean is known.      
Figure A.3 Accuracy and precision. 
accurate, imprecise
inaccurate, imprecise
accurate, precise
inaccurate, precise
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET framework. Combine scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp
convert pdf image to jpg online; best program to convert pdf to jpg
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
changing pdf file to jpg; convert pdf pages to jpg online
534 
APPENDIX A 
Measurement Fundamentals
calibration .  The random error, called imprecision, is the size of the shot pattern and 
cannot be improved by adjusting the sighting.  Accuracy  is the closeness to the true 
value, and  precision  is the repeatability or consistency of the measurements. 
Statistical calculations help us estimate a more precise value when a sample of 
imprecise measurements is taken in the presence of random errors. The average, or 
mean, provides this estimate.  
A.4.1 Rules for Estimating Errors 
When designing a measurement protocol to compute a parameter defined in terms 
of measured variables, it is necessary to estimate the error in the parameter due to 
the combined errors in the variables. A procedure for computing this overall error 
follows:
1.  Prepare a table of data including the  ±   error estimate for each variable. 
Generally, the estimated error contains no more than two significant figures.  
2.  If the parameter to be computed is  X,  where  X  is a function of measured 
variables ( v  
i 
), 
X = X(v
1
v
2
, . . . , v
n
)
(A.6)  
compute the partial derivatives ∂ X /∂ v  
1
, ∂ X /∂ v  
2
, . . . , ∂ X /∂ v  
n 
and evaluate each to 
three significant figures using the recorded data ( v  
1
 v  
2
, . . . ,  v  
n 
).  
3.  Compute the total absolute error  E  using 
E
ΔX
X
v
1
-------
Δv
1
X
v
2
-------
Δv
2
. . .
X
v
n
-------
Δv
n
+
+
+
=
=
(A.7)  
where Δ v  
i 
is the error in the recorded value  v  
i 
. Round  E  to two significant figures. 
A more conventional error measure is the  root-mean-square (rms)  error 
given by the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual error terms: 
E
rms
X
v
1
-------Δv
1
2
X
v
2
-------Δv
2
2
. . .
X
v
n
-------Δv
n
2
+
+
+
=
(A.8)  
The rms error measure yields a closer approximation to the actual error.  
4.  Compute  X  using  Equation A.6  to one more decimal place than the rounded 
error  E.  For example, if  E   =   ±  0.039, and  X  is computed to be 8.9234, then 
this value is rounded to the same number of decimal places as  E,  giving 8.923. 
When computing  X,  treat  v  
1
 v  
2
, . . . ,  v  
n 
as exact numbers.  
5.  The result is 
X = 8.923 ±  0.039      
The following list is a summary of important points to keep in mind when treat-
ing numbers and calculating errors in laboratory data analysis:
1.  Note the number of significant figures that a particular instrument displays.  
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
An advanced .NET control able to batch convert PDF documents to image formats in C#.NET. Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
convert pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. VB.NET Components to combine various scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp
batch pdf to jpg; best way to convert pdf to jpg
Bibliography  
535
2.  Record all values with the correct number of significant digits. If the instru-
ment display does not provide a digital output, this may require that the 
observer estimate the accuracy of the measurement.  
3.  Different instruments in a system may have different numbers of significant 
digits.  
4.  
nificant digits when performing calculations.  
5.  If events can be repeated, better estimates of values can be obtained by averag-
ing. The standard deviation of these samples gives a measure of precision in 
the average.        
QUESTIONS AND EXERCISES 
A.1.  
Express each of the following quantities with a more appropriate SI prefix 
equivalent:
a. 100,000,000 kg  
b. 0.000000025 m  
c. 16.9  ×  10  - 10  s     
A.2.  
Plot the histogram and calculate the mean, standard deviation, median, mode, and 
geometric mean for the data obtained from Class Discussion Item A.5.  
A.3.  
rectangular cantilever beam with an end load of 12,520  ±  10 N? The beam geometry, 
12.1 cm high. The maximum stress occurs at the wall on the surface of the beam and 
is given by
σ
max
Mc
I
--------
=
where  M  is the bending moment given by the product of the force and the beam 
length,  c  is the distance from the neutral axis given by half the height, and  I  is the 
area moment of inertia of the beam cross section given by 
I
1
12
------
wh
3
=
where  w  and  h  are the width and height of the beam cross section, respectively.    
BIBLIOGRAPHY 
Beckwith ,  T.   ,    Marangoni ,  R.   , and    Lienhard ,  J.   ,   Mechanical Measurements,   Addison-Wesley, 
Reading, MA,  1993 . 
Chapra ,  S.    and    Canale ,  R.   ,   Introduction to Computing for Engineers,   McGraw-Hill, New 
York,  1994 . 
Chatfield ,  C.   ,   Statistics for Technology,   Penguin Books, Middlesex, England,  1970 . 
Doeblin ,  E.   ,   Measurement Systems Applications and Design,   4th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 
New York,  1990 .   
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Gratis control for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file.
.pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
PDF. Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. Turn
convert pdf to jpeg on; convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg
536
Physical Principles 
APPENDIX OBJECTIVES 
After you read, discuss, study, and apply ideas in this appendix, you will be able to:  
1.  Identify possible relationships between various physical quantities 
2.  Identify approaches for measuring nearly all physical quantities   
Sensor and transducer design always involves the application of some law or prin-
ciple of physics or chemistry that relates the variable of interest to some measurable 
quantity. The following list summarizes many of the physical laws and principles 
that have potential application in sensor and transducer design. Some examples of 
applications are also provided. This list is extremely useful to a transducer designer 
who is searching for a method to measure a physical quantity. Practically every 
related by the respective principles are highlighted.
■ 
Ampere’s law:  The integral of the  magnetic field  around a closed loop is 
proportional to the  current  piercing the loop.
A magnetic pickup sensor uses this effect as a nonintrusive method of 
measuring current in a conductor.     
■ 
Archimedes’ principle:  The buoyant  force  exerted on a submerged or floating 
object is equal to the weight of the fluid displaced. The  volume  displaced 
depends on the fluid  density. 
A ball submersion hydrometer uses this effect to measure the density of a 
fl uid (e.g., automotive coolant).     
■ 
Bernoulli’s equation:  Conservation of energy in a fluid predicts a relationship 
between  pressure  and  velocity  of the fluid.
A pitot tube uses this effect to measure air speed of an aircraft. Video 
Demo B.1 shows an example of how to relate pressure readings to fl ow 
velocity.     
A P P P E E N N D D I X 
V
i
d
e
o
D
e
m
o
B.1 Flow over a 
cylinder in a wind 
tunnel 
Physical Principles 
537
■ 
Biot-Savart’s law:  The contribution of a  current  element to a  magnetic field  at 
      ■ 
Biot’s law:  The rate of  heat conduction  through a medium is directly 
proportional to the  temperature  difference across the medium.
This principle is basic to time constants associated with temperature 
transducers.     
■ 
Blagdeno law:  The freezing  temperature  of a liquid drops and the boiling 
temperature rises with  concentration  of impurities in the liquid.  
■ 
Boyle’s law:  An ideal gas maintains a constant  pressure-volume  product 
with constant  temperature.   
■ 
Bragg’s law:   The intensity of an X-ray beam diffracted by a  crystal lattice  
is related to the crystal plane separation and the  wavelength  of the beam.
An X-ray diffraction system uses this effect to measure the crystal lattice 
geometry of a crystalline specimen.     
■ 
Brewster’s law:  The  index of refraction  of a material is related to the angle 
of  polarized light  reflection or transmission.
A Brewster’s window on a laser tube is used to extract some of the power 
in the form of a laser beam. Lasers are used extensively in measurement 
systems.     
■ 
Butterfly effect:  Chaotic nonlinear systems exhibit a sensitive dependence on 
initial conditions.  
■ 
Centrifugal force:  A body moving along a curved path experiences an apparent 
outward  force  in line with the radius of curvature.  
■ 
Charles’ law:  An ideal gas maintains a constant  pressure-temperature  
product with constant  volume.   
■ 
Christiansen effect:  Powders suspended in a liquid (i.e., a colloidal solution) 
result in altered fluid  refraction  properties.  
■ 
Corbino effect:   Current  flow is induced in a conducting disk rotating in a 
magnetic field.   
■ 
Coriolis effect:  A body moving relative to a rotating frame of reference (e.g., 
the earth) experiences a  force  relative to the frame (see Internet Link B.1).
A Coriolis flow meter uses this effect to measure mass flow rate in a 
u-tube in rotational vibration.     
■ 
Coulomb’s law:    Electric charges  exert a  force  between each other.  
■ 
Curie-Weiss law:  There is a transition  temperature  at which ferromagnetic 
materials exhibit  paramagnetic  behavior.  
■ 
d’Alembert’s principle:   Acceleration  of a  mass  is equivalent to an equal and 
opposite applied  force.   
■ 
Debye frequency effect:  The  conductance  of an electrolyte increases (i.e., the 
resistance  decreases) with  frequency.   
■ 
Doppler effect:  The  frequency  received from a wave source (e.g., sound or 
light) depends on the  speed  of the source.
I
n
t
e
r
n
e
t
L
i
n
k
B.1 Coriolis 
effect video 
demonstrations 
538 
APPENDIX B 
Physical Principles
A laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) uses the frequency shift of laser light 
reflected off of particles suspended in a fluid to measure fluid velocity.
         ■ 
Edison effect:  When metal is heated in a vacuum, it emits charged particles 
(i.e.,  thermionic emission ) at a rate dependent on  temperature. 
A vacuum tube amplifier is based on this effect, where electrons are 
emitted and controlled to produce amplification of current.     
■ 
Faraday’s law of electrolysis:  The rate of  ion deposition  or depletion is 
proportional to the electrolytic  current.   
■ 
Faraday’s law of induction:  A coil resists a change in  magnetic field  linkage 
with an  electromotive force. 
The induced voltages in the secondary coils of a linear variable differential 
transformer (LVDT) are a result of this effect.     
■ 
Gauss effect:  The  resistance  of a conductor increases when  magnetized.   
■ 
Gladstone-Dale law:  The  index of refraction  of a substance is dependent on 
density.   
■ 
Gyroscopic effect:  A body rotating about one axis resists rotation about other 
axes (see Internet Link B.2).
A navigation gyroscope uses this effect to track the orientation of a body 
with the aid of a gimbal-mounted flywheel that maintains constant 
orientation in space.     
■ 
Hall effect:  A  voltage  is generated perpendicular to  current  flow in a 
magnetic field. 
A Hall effect proximity sensor detects when a magnetic field changes due 
to the presence of a metallic object.
         ■ 
Hertz effect:   Ultraviolet light  affects the discharge of a spark across a gap.  
■ 
Hooke’s Law:  Axial  stress  in a uniaxially loaded, linear elastic material is 
directly proportional to axial  strain. 
Resistance measurements from a strain gage can be converted to strain 
readings, which can be directly related to stresses in a loaded part.     
■ 
Johnsen-Rahbek effect:   Friction  at interfaces between a conductor, 
semiconductor, or insulator increases with  voltage  across the interfaces.  
■ 
Joule’s law:   Heat  is produced by  current  flowing through a  resistor. 
The design of a hot-wire anemometer is based on this principle.     
■ 
Kerr effect:  Applying a  voltage  across a substance can cause  optical 
polarization. 
■ 
Kohlrausch’s law:  An  electrolytic  substance has a limiting conductance 
(minimum  resistance ).  
■ 
Lambert’s cosine law:  The reflected  luminance  of a surface varies with the 
cosine of the  angle of incidence.   
■ 
Lenz’s law:  Induced  current  flows in the direction to oppose the change in 
magnetic field  that produces it.  
I
n
t
e
r
n
e
t
L
i
n
k
B.2 Gyroscopic 
effect video 
demonstrations 
Physical Principles 
539
■ 
Lorentz’s force law:  A  current -carrying coductor in a  magnetic field  
experiences a  force. 
Based on this law, a galvanometer measures current by measuring the 
deflection of a pivoted coil in a permanent magnetic field.     
■ 
Magnetostrictive effect:  a ferromagnetic material  constricts  when 
surrounded by a  magnetic field. 
This effect is used by magnetoresistive linear displacement sensors (see 
Video Demo B.2).     
■ 
Magneto-rheological effect:  A magneto-rheological fluid’s  viscosity  can 
increase dramatically in the presence of a  magnetic field. 
      ■ 
Magnus effect:  When fluid flows over a rotating body, the body experiences a 
force  in a direction perpendicular to the flow.  
■ 
Meissner effect:  A  superconducting  material within a  magnetic field  blocks 
this field and experiences no internal field.  
■ 
Moore’s law:  The density of transistors that can be manufactured on an 
integrated circuit doubles every 18 months.  
■ 
Murphy’s law:  Whatever can go wrong will go wrong and at the wrong time 
and in the wrong place.
Your experiments in the laboratory will often demonstrate this law.     
■ 
Nernst effect:   Heat flow  across  magnetic field  lines produces a  voltage.   
■ 
Newton’s law:   Acceleration  of an object is proportional to  force  acting on 
the object.  
■ 
Ohm’s law:   Current  through a  resistor  is proportional to the  voltage  drop 
across the resistor.  
■ 
Parkinson’s law:  Human work expands to fill the time allotted for it.  
■ 
Peltier effect:  When  current  flows through the junction between two metals, 
heat  is absorbed or liberated at the junction.
Thermocouple measurements can be adversely affected by this principle.     
■ 
Photoconductive effect:  When  light  strikes certain semiconductor materials, 
the  resistance  of the material decreases.
A photodiode, which is used extensively in photodetector pairs, functions 
based on this effect.     
■ 
Photoelectric effect:  When  light  strikes a metal cathode, electrons are emit-
ted and attracted to an anode, resulting in  current  flow.
The operation of a photomultiplier tube is based on this effect.     
■ 
Photovoltaic effect:  When  light  strikes a semiconductor in contact with a 
metal base, a  voltage  is produced.
The operation of a solar cell is based on this effect.     
■ 
Piezoelectric effect:   Charge  is displaced across a crystal when it is strained.
A piezoelectric accelerometer measures charge polarization across a 
V
i
d
e
o
D
e
m
o
B.2 Magneto-
restrictive position 
sensor 
540 
APPENDIX B 
Physical Principles
A piezoelectric microphone’s ability to convert sound pressure waves to a 
voltage signal is a result of this principle.     
■ 
Piezoresistive effect:   Resistance  is proportional to an applied  stress. 
This effect is partially responsible for the response of a strain gage.     
■ 
Pinch effect:  The cross section of a liquid conductor reduces with  current.   
■ 
Poisson effect:  A material deforms in a direction perpendicular to an applied 
stress. 
This effect is partially responsible for the response of a strain gage.     
■ 
Pyroelectric effect:  A crystal becomes  polarized  when its  temperature  
changes.  
■ 
Raleigh criteria:  Relates the  acceleration  of a fluid to bubble formation.  
■ 
Raoult’s effect:   Resistance  of a conductor changes when its length is changed.
This effect is partially responsible for the response of a strain gage.     
■ 
Seebeck effect:  Dissimilar metals in contact result in a  voltage  difference 
across the junction that depends on  temperature. 
This is the primary effect that explains the function of a thermocouple.     
■ 
Shape memory effect:  A deformed metal, when heated, returns to its original 
shape (see Video Demo B.3).  
■ 
Snell’s law:  Reflected and refracted rays of  light  at an optical interface are 
related to the angle of incidence.  
■ 
Stark effect:  The  spectral lines  of an electromagnetic source split when the 
source is in a strong  electric field.   
■ 
Stefan-Boltzmann law:  The  heat  radiated from a black body is proportional 
to the fourth power of its  temperature. 
The design of a pyrometer is based on this principle.     
■ 
Stokes’ law:  The  wavelength  of light emitted from a fluorescent material is 
always longer than that of the absorbed photons.  
■ 
Tribo-electric effect:  Relative motion and  friction  between two dissimilar 
metals produces a  voltage  between the interface.  
■ 
Wiedemann-Franz law:  The ratio of  thermal  to  electrical   conductivity  of a 
material is proportional to its absolute  temperature.   
■ 
Wien effect:  The  conductance  of an electrolyte increases (i.e., the  resistance  
decreases) with applied  voltage.   
■ 
Wien’s displacement law:  As the  temperature  of an incandescent material 
increases, the spectrum of emitted  light  shifts toward blue.
V
i
d
e
o
D
e
m
o
B.3 Shape-
memory alloy 
orthodontic wire 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested