Figure 2.48 Common ground. 
+ ouput
– output
+ power input
– power input
circuit
common
ground
(COM)
double output power
supply
+ ouput
– output
+ input
– input
chassis
ground
oscilloscope
internal connection
(common ground)
chassis
ground
2.10 Practical Considerations 
61
the amplitude of the input signal by the same factor. Thus a 10X probe will increase 
the magnitude of the input impedance of the oscilloscope by a factor of 10, but the 
displayed voltage will be only 1/10 of the amplitude of the actual terminal voltage. 
Most oscilloscopes offer an alternative scale to be used with a 10X probe.  
2.10.6 Grounding and Electrical Interference 
It is important to provide a common ground defining a common voltage refer-
ence among all instruments and power sources used in a circuit or system. As 
illustrated in  Figure 2.48 , many power supplies have both a positive DC output 
( +  output) and a negative DC output ( -   output). These outputs produce both posi-
tive and negative voltages referenced to a common ground, usually labeled COM. 
On other instruments and circuits that may be connected to the power supply, all 
input and output voltages must be referenced to the same common ground. It is 
wise to double-check the integrity of each signal ground connection when assem-
bling a group of devices. 
chassis ground  is internally connected to the ground wire on the power cord and 
to the metal case enclosing an instrument to provide user safety if there is an internal 
fault in the instrument (see Section 2.10.7). 
Figure 2.49  illustrates an interference problem where high-frequency electrical 
noise 
The area circumscribed by the leads encloses external magnetic fields from any AC 
magnetic sources in the environment, such as AC power lines or electric machinery. 
This would result in an undesirable magnetically induced AC voltage, as a result of 
Faraday’s law of induction, given by
V
noise
A
dB
dt
-------
 
(2.79)  
where  A  is the area enclosed by the leads and  B  is the external magnetic field. The 
measured voltage differs from the actual value according to
V
measured
V
actual
V
noise
+
=
(2.80)   
Best pdf to jpg converter for - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file to jpg online; change pdf to jpg online
Best pdf to jpg converter for - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change pdf file to jpg; convert pdf file into jpg format
Figure 2.49 Inductive coupling. 
oscilloscope
V
measured
fluctuating
external 
magneticfield B
V
actual
+
+
leadwire
62 
CHAPTER 2 
Electric Circuits and Components 
Many types of  electromagnetic interference  (EMI) can reduce the effective-
a circuit can cause noise and unwanted signals. These effects can be mitigated using 
a number of standard methods. The first approach is to eliminate or move the source 
of the interference, if possible. The source may be a switch, motor, or AC power line 
in close proximity to the circuit. It may be possible to remove, relocate, shield, or 
improve grounding of the interference source. However, this is not usually possible, 
and standard methods to reduce external EMI or internal coupling may be applied. 
Some standard methods are
■ 
Eliminate potential differences caused by  multiple point grounding.  A common 
ground bus (large conductor, plate, or solder plane) should have a resistance 
small enough that voltage drops between grounding points are negligibly small. 
Also, make the multiple point connections close to ensure that each ground point 
is at approximately the same potential.  
■ 
Isolate sensitive signal circuits from high-power circuits using  optoisolators  or 
in Chapter 3) that electrically decouple two sides of a circuit by transmitting a 
antage 
is that the sensitive signal circuits are isolated from current spikes in the high-
power circuit.  
■ 
Eliminate inductive coupling caused by  ground loops.  When the distance 
between multiple ground points is large, noise can be inductively coupled 
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM 2.10 
Automotive Circuits 
are grounded to the frame. Explain how this results in an electrical circuit.  
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
changing pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg file
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert pdf pages to jpg online; convert pdf document to jpg
Figure 2.50  Ground loop.
+
+
5V
V
cc
GND
V
cc
GND
A
a
b
B
C
D
c
d
ground loop
2.10 Practical Considerations 
63
points.  Figure 2.50  illustrates how you should be careful to not create large 
ground loops when wiring a circuit on a breadboard. Both circuits shown 
are providing power (5V and ground) to an integrated circuit. The wiring on 
the left, connected at points  A  and  B  via wires  a  and  b  creates a large ground 
loop area which can pick up induced voltages in the presence of fluctuating 
magnetic fields, as described above. The wiring on the right, connected 
to points  C  and  D  via wires  c  and  d  creates very little area in the resulting 
circuit; therefore, very little induced voltage will occur even in the presence 
of external fields.  
■ 
Shield sensitive circuits with earth-grounded metal covers to block external 
electric and magnetic fields.  
■ 
Use short leads in connecting all circuits to reduce capacitive and inductive 
coupling between leads.  
■ 
Use “ decoupling ” or “ bypass ”  capacitors  (e.g., 0.1  μ F) between the power 
and ground pins of integrated circuits to provide a short circuit for high-
frequency noise.  
■ 
Use coaxial cable or twisted pair cable for high-frequency signal lines to 
minimize the effects of external magnetic fields.  
■ 
in the presence of power circuits (where large currents produce large magnetic 
fields) to help maintain signal integrity.  
■ 
If printed circuit boards are being designed, ensure that adequate  ground 
planes  are provided. A ground plane is a large surface conductor that 
minimizes potential differences among ground points.    
Much more information and advice concerning how to prototype circuits prop-
erly and carefully can be found in Sections 2.10.2 and 7.10.4. 
2.10.7 Electrical Safety 
When using and designing electrical systems, safety should always be a concern. 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Best PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful .NET WinForms application to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
.pdf to .jpg converter online; change pdf to jpg file
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for converting PDF to image in C#.NET Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
change pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg online
Figure 2.51 Three-prong AC power plug. 
hot (black) wire
neutral (white) wire
earth ground (green) wire
64 
CHAPTER 2 
Electric Circuits and Components 
neutral, and ground.  Figure 2.51  illustrates the prongs on a plug that is inserted 
connected to the ground prong. The two flat prongs (hot and neutral) of a plug 
complete the active circuit, allowing alternating current to flow from the wall 
outlet through an electrical device. The round ground prong is connected only to 
the chassis of the device and not to the power circuit ground in the device. The 
chassis ground provides an alternative path to earth ground, reducing the danger 
to a person who may contact the chassis when there is a fault in the power cir-
cuit. Without a separation between chassis and power ground, a high voltage can 
complete a path to ground. Removing the ground prong or using a three-prong-
to-two-prong adapter carelessly creates a hazard (see  v Discussion Items 2.11  
and  2.12 ). 
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM 2.11 
Safe Grounding 
Consider the following oscilloscope whose power cord ground prong has been 
brok
describe the possible danger you face.  
oscilloscope
power cord
internal
power circuit
+ hot prong
wire
– neutral 
prong
wire
chassis
round prong
ground wire
connected to chassis
ground prong
broken off
internal
electrical
short
+
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
reader pdf to jpeg; convert pdf to jpeg on
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Best WPF PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful PDF converter. PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
convert multipage pdf to jpg; change file from pdf to jpg on
2.10 Practical Considerations 
65
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM 2.12
Electric Drill Bathtub Experience 
The following electric drill runs on household power and has a metal housing. You 
use a three-prong-to-two-prong adapter to plug the drill into the wall socket. You 
are standing in a wet bathtub drilling a hole in the wall. You are unaware that the 
black wire’s insulation has worn thin and the bare copper black wire is contacting 
the metal housing of the drill. How have you created a lethal situation for yourself? 
How could it have been prevented or mitigated? 
plug
black
white
green
fault
electric
drill
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM 2.13 
Dangerous EKG 
the next room, and our patient experiences a cardiac arrest. You and the hospital 
facilities engineer have determined that there were multiple grounding points in the 
patient’s room (see the illustration), and a fault in electrical equipment in the next 
room caused current to flow in the ground wire from the piece of the equipment. 
You are on the scene to determine if there could have been a lethal current through 
the patient. Consider the fact that ground lines have finite resistance per unit length 
and that a few microamps through the heart can cause ventricular fibrillation (a fatal 
malfunction). 
faulty
equipment
EKG
only ground
lines shown
ground bus A
ground bus B
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Best and professional image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
best way to convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg on
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Best adobe PDF to image converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap
.pdf to jpg converter online; convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg
66 
CHAPTER 2 
Electric Circuits and Components 
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM 2.14 
High-Voltage Measurement Pose 
When performing a high-voltage test, a creative electrical technician claims that 
■ CLASS DISCUSSION ITEM 2.15 
Lightning Storm Pose 
A park ranger at Rocky Mountain National Park recommends that if your hair rises 
when hiking in an open area during a lightning storm, it is imperative to crouch 
down low to the ground keeping your feet together. Explain why this might be life-
saving advice.  
QUESTIONS AND EXERCISES 
Section 2.2 Basic Electrical Elements 
2.1.  
What is the resistance of a kilometer-long piece of 14-gage (0.06408 inch diameter) 
copper wire?  
2.2.  
Determine the possible range of resistance values for each of the following:
a. Resistor  R  
1
with color bands: red, brown, yellow.  
b. Resistor  R  
2
with color bands: black, violet, orange.  
c. The series combination of  R  
1
and  R  
2
 
d. The parallel combination of  R  
1
and  R  
2
.   
Note: the color bands are listed in order, starting with the first.  
Electricity passing through a person can cause discomfort, injury, and even 
death. The human body, electrically speaking, is roughly composed of a low-
resistance core (on the order of 500 Ω across the abdomen) surrounded by high-
resistance skin (on the order of 10 kΩ through the skin when dry). When the skin 
is wet, its resistance drops dramatically. Currents through the body below 1 mA 
are usually not perceived. Currents as low as 10 mA can cause tingling and muscle 
contractions. Currents through the thorax as low as 100 mA can affect normal heart 
rhythm. Currents above 5 A can cause tissue burning. Video Demo 2.15 shows an 
electronic toy that illustrates how current can flow through human skin. In this 
case a person’s hand is being used to complete a circuit to control a blinking LED. 
humans when they are not careful around high-voltage lines. 
V
i
d
e
o
D
e
m
o
2.15Human 
circuit toy ball
2.16Squirrel 
zapped by power 
lines
2.17Stupid man 
zapped by power 
lines
Questions and Exercises 
67
2.3.  
What colors should bands  a,   b,   c,  and  d  be for the following circuit B to have the 
equivalent resistance of circuit A? 
brown
black
red
gold
gold
brown
green
red
a
b
c
d
circuit A
circuit B
2.4.  
ixed 
value resistor
analysis.  
2.5.  
Document a complete and thorough answer to  Class Discussion Item 2.1 .    
Section 2.3 Kirchhoff’s Laws 
2.6.  
Does it matter in which direction you assume the current flows when applying Kirch-
hoff’s laws to a circuit? Why?  
2.7.  
You quickly need a 50 Ω resistor but have a store of only 100 Ω resistors. What can 
you do?  
2.8.  
Using Ohm’s law, KVL, and KCL, derive an expression for the equivalent resistance 
of three parallel resistors ( R  
1
,  R  
2
, and  R  
3
).  
2.9.  
Derive current division formulas, similar to  Equation 2.38 , for three resistors in parallel.  
2.10.  
Given two resistors  R  
1
and  R  
2
, where  R  
1
is much greater than  R  
2
, prove that the paral-
lel combination is approximately equal to  R  
2
 
2.11.  
Derive an expression for the equivalent capacitance of two capacitors attached in series.  
2.12.  
Derive an expression for the equivalent capacitance of two capacitors attached in 
parallel.  
2.13.  
Derive an expression for the equivalent inductance of two inductors attached in series.  
2.14.  
Derive an expression for the equivalent inductance of two inductors attached in parallel.  
2.15.  
Find  I  
out 
and  V  
out
in the following circuit: 
+
1 V
5 Ω  
+
V
out
I
out
2.16.  
Find  V  
out
in the following circuit: 
10 kΩ
+
+
V
out
40 kΩ
5 V
15 V
+
68 
CHAPTER 2 
Electric Circuits and Components 
2.17.  
For the circuit in Question 2.27, with  R  
1
 1 kΩ,  R  
2
 2 kΩ,  R  
3
 3 kΩ, and 
V  
in
 5 V, find
a. the current through  R  
1
b. the current through  R  
3
c. the voltage across  R  
2
2.18.  
For the circuit in  Example 2.4 , find
a. the current through  R  
4
b. the voltage across  R  
5
You can use results from the example to help with your calculations.     
2.19.  
Given the following circuit with  R  
1
 1 kΩ,  R  
2
 2 kΩ,  R  
3
 3 kΩ,  R  
4
 4 kΩ,  
R  
5
 1 kΩ, and  V  
s 
 10 V, determine
a. the total equivalent resistance seen by  V  
s 
b. the voltage at node  A   
c. the current through resistor  R  
5
+
R
1
R
2
A
R
4
R
5
R
3
V
s
2.20.  
Given the following circuit with  R  
1
 2 kΩ,  R  
2
 4 kΩ,  R  
3
 5 kΩ,  R  
4
 3 kΩ,  
R  
5
 1 kΩ, and  V  
s 
 10 V, determine
a. the total equivalent resistance seen by  V  
s 
b. the voltage at node  A   
c. the current through resistor  R  
5
Also, how is this circuit different from the circuit in Question 2.19? If the resistance 
values were the same, would the circuits be identical? If not, what parts are different?  
+
A
R
4
R
2
R
3
R
1
R
5
V
s
Questions and Exercises 
69
2.21.  
For the following circuit with  V  
1
 1 V,  I  
1
 1 A,  R  
1
 10 Ω, and  R  
2
 100 Ω, 
what is     V
R
2
 
+
R
1
R
2
I
1
V
1
V
R
2
+
2.22.  
For the following circuit with  R  
1
 1 kΩ,  R  
2
 9 kΩ,  R  
3
 10 kΩ,  R  
4
 1 kΩ,  
R  
5
 1 kΩ,  V  
1
 5 V, and  V  
2
 10 V, find  I  and the voltage at node  A.  
+
+
A
R
1
R
2
R
3
R
4
R
5
I
V
1
V
2
2.23.  
Find the equivalent resistance of the circuit below, as seen by voltage source  V.  Use 
the following values for the resistors:  R  
1
 1 kΩ,  R  
2
 2 kΩ,  R  
3
 3 kΩ,  R  
4
 4 kΩ, 
and  R  
5
 5 kΩ. 
+
V
R
1
R
5
R
4
R
3
R
2
2.24.  
Solve for  I  
out
and  V  
out
in  Example 2.4  by writing and solving KVL and KCL equa-
tions for all loops and nodes in the original circuit.    
Section 2.4  Voltage and Current Sources 
and Meters 
2.25.  
What is the output impedance of your laboratory DC power supply? What is the 
input impedance of your laboratory oscilloscope when DC coupled?  
2.26.  
Explain why measuring voltages with an oscilloscope across impedances on the 
order of 1 MΩ may result in significant errors. Document your conclusions with 
analysis.  
70 
CHAPTER 2 
Electric Circuits and Components 
2.27.  
For the following circuit, what is  V  
out
in terms of  V  
in
for
a.  R  
1
 50 Ω,  R  
2
 10 kΩ,  R  
3
 1.0 MΩ?  
b.  R  
1
 50 Ω,  R  
2
 500 kΩ,  R  
3
 1.0 MΩ? 
+
R
1
R
2
V
in
R
3
V
out
+
If  R  
3
represents the input impedance associated with a device measuring the voltage 
across  R  
2
, what conclusions can you make about the two voltage measurements?     
2.28.  
For the circuit in Question 2.27, if  R  
1
represents the output impedance of a voltage 
source and  R  
3
is assumed to be infinite (representing an ideal voltmeter), what 
effect does  R  
1
have on the voltage measurement being made? Also, what would 
the effect be for each of the  R  
2
values in Question 2.27? Please comment on the 
results.    
Section 2.5  Thevenin and Norton Equivalent 
Circuits 
2.29.  
What is the Thevenin equivalent of your laboratory DC power supply?  
2.30.  
What is the Thevenin equivalent of the circuit in Question 2.27 for the resistance val-
ues in part “a?”    
Section 2.6 Alternating Current Circuit Analysis 
2.31.  
For the circuit in  Example 2.7 , find the steady state voltage across the capaci-
tor as a function of time. You can use results from the example to help with your 
calculations.  
2.32.  
For the following circuit, what are the steady state voltages across  R  
1
,  R  
2
, and  C,  if 
V  
s 
 10 V DC,  R  
1
 1 kΩ,  R  
2
 1 kΩ, and  C   =  0.01  μ F? 
+
V
s
R
1
R
2
C
2.33.  
Find the steady state current  I ( t ) in the following circuit, where  R  
1
  R  
2
 100 kΩ,
C   =  1  μ F, and  L   =  20 H for
a.  V  
s 
 5 V DC  
b.  V  
s 
 5 cos( π  t ) V 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested