ABOUT
THIS
BOOK
xx
into the iPhone arena, because it will allow you to choose whether to write web apps or 
create native applications for each and every project that you work on.
If you want to learn about iPhone web development, you should have a good 
understanding of web design in general, including 
HTML
CSS
, and JavaScript. You 
don’t need to know any more dynamic languages to create great iPhone web apps. In 
fact, Apple’s powerful Dashcode development platform is built entirely using these 
three languages.
If you want to learn about iPhone 
SDK
programming, you should have some expe-
rience with programming in general. It’d be best if you’ve worked with C before, but 
that’s not a necessity; if you haven’t, you can read our introduction to C in chapter 9, 
and you should probably expect to do some research on your own to clarify things. 
There’s definitely no need to be familiar with Objective-C, Cocoa, or Apple program-
ming in general. We’ll give you everything you need to become familiar with Apple’s 
unique programming style. You’ll probably have a leg up if you understand object-
oriented concepts, but again it’s not necessary (and again, you’ll find an introduction 
in chapter 9).
Roadmap
We’ve divided this book into four parts, with one covering introductory iPhone con-
cepts, one covering web development, and two covering 
SDK
programming.
Part 1 introduces the iPhone and the styles of programming that are possible for 
this device.
Chapter 1 explains the details of the iPhone and how it differs from the mobile 
phones that predated it. It also contains one of our most important concepts: the six 
unique features that truly make the iPhone stand out from the pack, and which are 
also of importance to programmers.
Chapter 2 describes the two styles of iPhone programming—web development and 
SDK
programming—and discusses the strengths of each, so that you can make an 
informed decision about how to program any individual application. It also briefly 
touches upon the idea of hybridizing the two styles of iPhone programming.
Part 2 includes all of our information about writing and rewriting web pages for 
use on the iPhone.
Chapter 3 presents the basics of what you can do to redevelop an existing web page 
for viewing on the iPhone. In the process, it touches upon many of the most impor-
tant factors concerning iPhone web pages, such as the viewport, the technology limita-
tions, and the event changes.
Chapter 4 covers the first of three web libraries for use on the iPhone. The WebKit 
is an extension to 
HTML
being worked on by Apple that gives you access to a variety of 
great features, from implicit animations to a built-in database.
Chapter 5 discusses the issue of how to make web pages that match the look and 
feel of iPhone native applications. In the process, it introduces a second notable web 
library, i
UI
, which creates iPhone-like animations and tables from simple 
HTML
.
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
Convert .pdf to .jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch pdf to jpg converter online; changing pdf to jpg on
Convert .pdf to .jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert online pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg c#
ABOUT
THIS
BOOK
xxi
Chapter 6 focuses on the third of our iPhone web libraries, Canvas, another 
HTML
extension championed by Apple. This graphical library gives you the ability to draw 
complex vector graphics and display them on the iPhone.
Chapter 7 turns to Dashcode, an Apple development environment that you can 
use to create iPhone web apps. With Dashcode’s integrated links to the WebKit and 
Canvas, you can use the lessons of the previous chapters while working in a graphical 
layout program.
Chapter 8 finishes off our look at web development by touching upon how you can 
test and debug your iPhone web apps, using a variety of third-party utilities.
Chapter 9 offers a bridge, providing an introductory look at the tools that will be 
useful for programming in Objective-C, including the C language, the object-oriented 
paradigm, and the 
MVC
architectural model.
Part 3 introduces the 
SDK
by covering all of the fundamental topics that you’ll 
need in order to program native apps for the iPhone.
Chapter 10 kicks things off by highlighting Objective-C, which is the programming 
language used on the iPhone, and the iPhone 
OS
, an immense collection of frame-
works that make many complex tasks very easy.
Chapter 11 looks at Xcode, the first major tool in the 
SDK
. This integrated develop-
ment environment does more than just compile your code. It also helps you correct 
simple errors as you type and provides quick, integrated access to all the iPhone pro-
gramming documents.
Chapter 12 shifts the focus to Interface Builder, a graphical design environment 
that allows you to create and place interface objects without writing a single line of 
code. Interface Builder is a powerful time-saver for programmers and is used through-
out the rest of the text as a result.
Chapter 13 covers simple view controllers. The basic view controller is an impor-
tant building block of the 
MVC
paradigm, dividing control from view, while the table 
view controller provides an easy way to organize information while matching the stan-
dard iPhone look and feel.
Chapter 14 steps back to talk about user interaction. It covers events, which users 
generate by touching the screen with one or more fingers, and actions, which happen 
when users interact with a control object like a button or a slider.
Chapter 15 finishes our look at view controllers by examining two more advanced 
possibilities. The tab bar view controllers allows for modal selection between multiple 
pages of content, and the navigation view controller adds hierarchy to tables. 
Part 4 completes our look at the iPhone by opening up the 
SDK
’s toolkit and exam-
ining many different features that may be of interest to programmers. At the same 
time, it also provides more complex programming examples, which should help pro-
grammers to develop full-length iPhone projects.
Chapter 16 opens up the SDK toolkit by talking about data. This includes user 
input, such as actions and preferences; data storage, such as files and databases; and 
tools that combine input and storage, such as the iPhone’s address book.
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert pdf file to jpg file; to jpeg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF files to JPG.
convert pdf image to jpg online; convert from pdf to jpg
ABOUT
THIS
BOOK
xxii
Chapter 17 highlights two of the most unique features on the iPhone, the acceler-
ometer and the 
GPS
, showing how the iPhone can track movement through space.
Chapter 18 covers another of the iPhone’s strengths—media—by showing how to 
do basic work with pictures, movies, and sounds
Chapter 19 provides an extensive look at graphics, centering on the iPhone’s vec-
tor graphic language, Quartz 
2D
. It also offers a brief overview of Core Animation and 
touches upon Open
GL
for the iPhone.
Chapter 20 concludes our tour through the iPhone’s toolkit by examining how it 
can be used to interact with the Internet. This chapter moves through the entire hier-
archy of Internet communication, from low-level host connections to 
URL
s, from web 
views to modern social languages like 
XML
and 
JSON
.
The appendixes contain some additional information that didn’t fit with the flow of 
the main text. Appendix A contains a list of 
SDK
objects and what they do. Appendix B 
features links for many web sites of note for iPhone programming. Appendix C includes 
the current information on how to deploy your 
SDK
programs to actual iPhones.
Code conventions and downloads
Code examples appear throughout this book. Longer listings will appear under clear 
special
font
code font; if you might type it into your computer, you’ll be able to clearly make it out.
With the exception of a few cases of abstract code examples, all code snip- 
pets began life as working programs. Our complete set of programs can be found at 
http://www.manning.com/iPhoneinAction. There should be two 
ZIP
files there, one 
each for the web and the 
SDK
programs. We encourage you to try out the programs as 
you read; they’ll often include additional code that doesn’t appear in the book and 
will provide more context. In addition, we feel that actually seeing a program working 
can greatly elucidate the code required to create it.
Our code snippets in this book all include extensive explanations. We have often 
included short annotations beside the code, and sometimes we have numbered cue-
balls beside lines of code, linking the subsequent discussion to the code lines. 
In part 2 of the book, all code snippets are basic 
HTML
(with 
CSS
or JavaScript, as 
appropriate). In the few places where we used 
PHP
as an example of a more dynamic 
language, we clearly noted it with 
<?
?> 
brackets. In parts 3 and 4 of the book, all 
code snippets are Objective-C. We’ve usually left header files out of parts 3 and 4, as 
they tend to be quite basic.
In a few cases in this book, we’ve included content from multiple files in a single list-
ing in order to provide a bigger picture of the program. In these situations, we’ve divided 
the contents of the different files within a single listing like this: 
:::
file #1
:::
Software requirements
ou just 
need to be able to design and deploy web pages. However chapter 7 (on Dashcode) and 
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
convert pdf pages to jpg online; convert pdf to jpg converter
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
convert pdf file into jpg format; convert pdf to jpg file
ABOUT
THIS
BOOK
xxiii
portions of chapter 8 (particularly the discussion of the iPhone Simulator) refer to soft-
ware that is available only on a Macintosh.
A Macintosh is absolutely required to do 
SDK
development. You’ll also need to 
have the iPhone 
SDK
, but this is freely downloadable as soon as you sign up with 
Apple, as is described in chapter 10.
Authors online
This book is intended to be an introduction to iPhone programming. Though it cov-
ers an extensive amount of information on the iPhone, there’s a lot that we couldn’t 
talk about in a single book. Feel free to come chat with the authors online about addi-
tional iPhone topics.
Our main hangout is http://iphoneinaction.manning.com. This blog contains the 
newest noteworthy links we have found, discussions on “missing classes” that we didn’t 
cover in this book, and occasional articles of more weight. 
There is also an Author Online forum where you can post comments and ask 
questions of other readers as well as of the authors at http://www.manning.com/
iPhoneinAction.
And we continue to host Christopher’s original iPhone forum on web develop-
ment, which can be found at http://www.iphonewebdev.com.
About the title
By combining introductions, overviews, and how-to examples, the In Action books are 
designed to help learning and remembering. According to research in cognitive science, 
the things people remember are things they discover during self-motivated exploration.
Although no one at Manning is a cognitive scientist, we are convinced that for learn-
ing to become permanent it must pass through stages of exploration, play, and, inter-
estingly, retelling of what is being learned. People understand and remember new 
learn in action. An essential part of an In Action guide is that it is example-driven. It 
encourages the reader to try things out, to play with new code, and explore new ideas.
There is another, more mundane, reason for the title of this book: our readers are 
busy. They use books to do a job or to solve a problem. They need books that allow 
them to jump in and jump out easily and learn just what they want just when they want 
it. They need books that aid them in action. The books in this series are designed for 
such readers.
About the cover illustration
The illustration on the cover of iPhone in Action is captioned “Russian, Prince of the 
Cherkeeses.” The Cherkess people are an ethnic group living in the Caucus region of 
Russia. The illustration is taken from the 1805 edition of Sylvain Maréchal’s four-vol-
ful 
variety of Maréchal’s collection reminds us vividly of how culturally apart the world’s 
towns and regions were just 200 years ago. Isolated from each other, people spoke 
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
change pdf into jpg; convert pdf into jpg format
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
.pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg
ABOUT
THIS
BOOK
xxiv
different dialects and languages and their place of origin and their station in life were 
easy to identify—by their language and by their dress. 
Dress codes have changed since then and the diversity by region, so rich at the 
time, has faded away. It is now hard to tell apart the inhabitants of different conti-
nents, let alone different regions or countries. Perhaps we have traded cultural diver-
sity for a more varied personal life—certainly a more varied and faster-paced 
technological life.
At a time when it is hard to tell one computer book from another, Manning cele-
brates the inventiveness and initiative of the computer business with book covers 
based on the rich diversity of regional life of two centuries ago, brought back to life by 
Maréchal’s pictures.
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi; batch pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. Copyright © <2000-2015> by <RasterEdge.com>. All Rights Reserved.
convert pdf to jpeg on; convert pdf pages to jpg
Part 1
Introducing 
iPhone programming
A
pple’s iPhone is more than just a new programming platform; it’s an 
entirely new way to think about mobile technologies. Part 1 of this book gets 
your feet wet by explaining how the iPhone differs from its predecessors.
We’ll start off in chapter 1 with a look at the iPhone itself, then follow up in 
chapter 2 by describing the two ways you can program for the iPhone: by creat-
ing web apps and by using the iPhone 
SDK
.
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
3
Introducing the iPhone
In the 1980s Apple Computer was the leading innovator in the computer business. 
Their 1984 Macintosh computer revolutionized personal computing and desktop 
publishing alike. But by the 1990s the company had begun to fade; it was depend-
ing on its loyal user base and its successes in the past rather than creating the new-
est cutting-edge technology.
That changed again in 1996 when founder Steve Jobs returned to the fold. Two 
years later he produced the first candy-colored iMac, a computer that walked the 
line between computing device, pop culture, and fashion statement. It was just the 
first of several innovations under Jobs’ watch, the most notable of which was proba-
bly 2001’s iPod. The iPod was a masterpiece of portable design. It highlighted a 
simple and beautiful interface, giving users access to thousands of songs that they 
could carry with them all the time. But the iPod just whetted the public’s appetite 
for more.
This chapter covers
Understanding Apple’s iPhone technology
Examining the iPhone’s specifications
Highlighting what makes the iPhone unique
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
4
C
HAPTER
Introducing the iPhone
By 2006 rumors and speculation were rumbling across the internet concerning 
Apple’s next major innovation: an iPod-like mobile phone that would eventually be 
called the iPhone. Given Apple’s twenty-first century record of technological innova-
tion and superb user design, the iPhone offered a new hope. It promised a new look 
at the entire cellular phone industry and the possibility of improved technology that 
wouldn’t be afraid to strike out in bold new directions.
Apple acknowledged that they were working on an iPhone in early 2007. When they 
previewed their technology, it became increasingly obvious that the iPhone would be 
something new and different. Excitement grew at a fever pitch. On the release 
date—June 29, 2007—people camped outside Apple stores. Huge lines stretched 
throughout the day as people competed to be among the first to own what can only be 
called a smarterphone, the first of a new generation of user-friendly mobile technology.
When users began to try out their new iPhones, the excitement only mounted. The 
iPhone was easy to use and it provided numerous bells and whistles, from stock and 
weather reports to always-on internet access. Sales reflected the frenzied interest. Apple 
sold 270,000 iPhones in two days and topped a million units in just a month and a half. 
Now, a year and a half after the initial release, interest in the iPhone continues to grow. 
Apple’s July 11, 2008, release of the new 
3G
iPhone and its public deployment of the 
iPhone software development kit (
SDK
) promise to multiply the iPhone’s success in the 
future, with even higher numbers of iPhone sales predicted for 2009 and beyond. 
The 
3G
managed to hit a million units sold in just three days. We’re atop a new techno-
logical wave, and it has yet to crest.
But what are the technologies that made the iPhone a hit, and how can you take 
advantage of them as an iPhone programmer? That will be the topic of this first chapter, 
where we’ll not only look at the core specifications of the iPhone but also discuss the six 
unique innovations that will make developing for the iPhone a totally new experience.
1.1
iPhone core specifications
The iPhone is more than a simple cell phone and more than a smartphone like the 
ones that have allowed limited internet access and other functionality over the last sev-
eral years. As we’ve already said, it’s a smarterphone. If the iPod is any indication of mar-
ket trends, the iPhone will be the first of a whole new generation of devices but will 
simultaneously stay the preeminent leader in the field because of Apple’s powerful 
brand recognition and its consistent record of innovation.
Technically, the iPhone exists in two largely similar versions: the 2007 original 
release and the 2008 
3G
release. Each is a 4.7- or 4.8-ounce computing device. Each 
contains a 620 
MHz
ARM
CPU
that has been underclocked to improve battery perfor-
mance and reduce heat. Each includes 128 
MB
of dynamic 
RAM
(
DRAM
), and from 4 
to 16 
GB
of Flash memory. The primary differences between the two devices center on 
the global positioning system (
GPS
) and networking, topics we’ll return to shortly.
Programmatically, the iPhone is built on Apple’s 
OS
X, which is itself built on top 
of Unix. Xcode, the same development environment that’s used to write code for 
the Macintosh, is the core of native programming for the device. Putting these two 
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
5
iPhone core specifications
elements together reveals a mature development and runtime environment of the 
sort that hasn’t been seen on most other cell phones (with the possible exception of 
Windows Mobile) and that upcoming smarterphone technologies won’t be able to 
rival for years.
However, these general specs tell only part of the story. By looking deeper into the 
iPhone’s input and output, its network, and its other capabilities, you’ll discover what 
makes the iPhone a truly innovative computing platform.
1.1.1
iPhone input and output specifications
Both the input and the output capabilities of the iPhone feature cutting-edge func-
tionality that will determine how developers program for the platform. We’re going to 
provide an overview of the technical specifications here; later in this chapter we’ll start 
looking at the iPhone’s most unique innovations, and then return for a more in-depth 
look at the input and output.
The iPhone’s input is conducted through a multi-touch-capable capacitive touch-
screen. There is no need for a stylus or other tool. Instead, a user literally taps on the 
screen with one or more fingers. 
The iPhone’s visual output is centered on a 3.5” 480x320-pixel screen. That’s a 
larger screen than has been seen on most cell phones to date, a fact that makes the 
iPhone’s small overall size that much more surprising. The device is literally almost all 
screen. The iPhone can be flipped to display either in portrait or landscape mode, 
meaning that it can offer either a 480-pixel-wide or a 480-pixel-tall screen.
The iPhone’s output also supports a variety of media, all at the high level that 
you’d expect from the designers of the iPod. Music in a number of formats—includ-
ing 
AAC
(Advanced Audio Coding), 
AIFF
(Audio Interchange File Format), Apple 
Lossless, Audible, 
MP3
, and 
WAV
—is supported, as well as 
MPEG4
videos. Generally, an 
iPhone delivers 
CD
-quality audio and high frame rate video.
The iPod Touch
A few months after the release of the original iPhone, Apple updated their iPod line 
with the iPod Touch. This was a new iPod version built on iPhone technology. Like the 
iPhone, it uses a 480x320 multi-touch screen and supports a mobile variant of Safari.
However, the iPod Touch is not a phone. The original version didn’t have any other 
telephonic apparatus, nor did it include other iPhone features such as a camera. The 
year 2008 saw the release of a new version of the iPod Touch that included an exter-
nal speaker and volume controls missing from the original 2007 model. Because of 
its lack of cellular connectivity, the iPod Touch can only access the internet through 
local-area wireless connections.
The developer advice in this book will largely apply to the iPod Touch as well, though 
we won’t specifically refer to that device.
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested