6
C
HAPTER
Introducing the iPhone
Although users will load most of their audio and video straight from their com-
puter, the iPhone can play streams at a recommended 900 kbps over wi-fi, but that can 
be pushed much higher on a good network. Multiple streaming rates always choose 
the optimal method for the current network interface—which brings us to the ques-
tion of the iPhone’s networking capabilities.
1.1.2
iPhone network specifications
The iPhone offers two methods of wireless network connectivity: local area and wide 
area.
The iPhone’s preferred method of connectivity is through a local-area wireless net-
work. It can use the 802.11g protocol to link up to any nearby wi-fi network (provided 
you have the permissions to do so). This can provide local connections at high speeds 
of up to 54 megabits per second (Mbit/s), thus making a network’s link to the inter-
net the most likely source of speed limits, not the iPhone itself. Everything has been 
done to make local-area connectivity as simple to use as possible. Passwords and other 
connection details are saved on the iPhone, which automatically reconnects to a 
known network whenever it can. Switches to and from local wi-fi networks are largely 
transparent and can happen in the middle of internet sessions.
The original iPhone uses the 
EDGE
network for wide-area wireless connectivity, fall-
ing back on this network whenever local-area wireless access isn’t available. The 
EDGE
network supports speeds up to 220 kilobits per second (kbit/s). Compared to old-style 
modems, which were accessing the early internet just 15 years ago, this is quite fast, 
but compared to broadband connectivity it’s not that good. Although the original 
iPhones have already been phased out, millions of users are still using them, and thus 
EDGE
network speed remains relevant.
The 3G iPhone supports the third-generation of mobile phone standards, which 
are well developed in Europe but just emerging in the United States. Network speed 
standards for 3G are loose, with stationary transfer speeds estimated as low as 384 
kbit/s or as high as several Mbit/s. A 
3G
connection should generally be noticeably 
quicker than 
EDGE
but still not as fast as a local-area network. In addition, 
3G
iPhones 
may drop back to 
EDGE
connectivity if there’s insufficient 3G coverage in an area.
These network specifications will place the first constraints on your iPhone web 
development (and will be of relevance to 
SDK
programs that access the internet as 
well). If you’re working in a corporate environment where everyone will be accessing 
your apps through a companywide wi-fi, you probably don’t need to worry that much 
about how latency could affect your application. If you’re creating iPhone web pages 
for wider use, however, you have to presume that some percentage of your iPhone 
users will be accessing them via a wide-area wireless network. This should encourage 
developers to fall back on lessons learned in the 1990s. Web pages should be smaller 
and use clean style sheets and carefully created images; data should be downloaded to 
the iPhone using Ajax or other technologies that allow for sporadic access to small bits 
of data.
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
Convert pdf to jpg for online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch pdf to jpg; convert .pdf to .jpg
Convert pdf to jpg for online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to high quality jpg; convert pdf into jpg
7
iPhone core specifications
Thus far, we’ve discussed iPhone specifications that are relevant to both web and 
SDK
development. However, there’s one additional element that’s clearly web only: the 
browser.
1.1.3
iPhone browser specifications
The iPhone’s browser is a mobile version of Apple’s Safari. It’s a full-fledged desktop-
grade browser with access to 
DOM
CSS
, and JavaScript. However, it doesn’t have access 
to some client-side third-party software that you might consider vital to your web 
page’s display. 
The two most-used third-party software packages that aren’t available natively to 
the iPhone are Flash and Java. There was some discussion of a Java release in 2008, but 
the 
SDK
’s restriction against downloads seems to have put that effort on hold. We’ll 
talk about these and other “missing technologies” more in chapter 3.
Beyond listing what’s available for the iPhone Safari browser (and what’s not), 
we’ll also note that it works in some unique ways. There are numerous small changes 
that optimize Safari for the iPhone. For example, rather than Safari’s standard tabbed 
browsing, individual “tabs” appear as separate windows that a user can move between 
as if they were individual pages.
iPhone’s Safari also features unique “chrome,” which is its rendition of toolbars. 
These gray bars appear at the top and bottom of every iPhone web screen. The 
chrome at the top of each page shows the current 
URL
and features icons for book-
marks and reloading; we’ll investigate how to hide this chrome when we look at 
iPhone optimized web development in chapter 3. The chrome at the bottom contains 
additional icons for moving around web pages and tabs. It’s a permanent fixture on 
iPhone web pages. This iPhone chrome is more noticeable than similar bars and but-
tons on a desktop browser because of the iPhone’s small screen size.
The web vs. the SDK
Throughout the book we’re going to talk about two major categories of programming 
for the iPhone: web development and SDK programming.
Web development involves the creation of web pages that work well on the iPhone. 
These pages use standard web technologies such as HTML, Cascading Style Sheets 
(CSS), JavaScript, PHP, Ruby on Rails, and Python; iPhone-specific technologies such 
as the WebKit, iUI, and Canvas; and iPhone-specific tools like Dashcode.
SDK programming involves the design of programs that run natively on the iPhone. 
These programs are written in Objective-C, compiled in Xcode, and then deployed 
through the iPhone App Store.
We’ll compare the two programming methods in the next chapter; then we’ll dedicate 
part 2 of this book to learning all about iPhone web development and parts 3 and 4 
to digging into Apple’s iPhone SDK.
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
change file from pdf to jpg; convert pdf into jpg format
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
batch pdf to jpg converter online; reader pdf to jpeg
8
C
HAPTER
Introducing the iPhone
Having discussed the general capabilities of the iPhone—its input, its output, its 
network, and its browser—we’ve hit all of the major elements. But the iPhone also has 
some additional hardware features that are worthy of specific note.
1.1.4
Other iPhone hardware features
Cell phones feature numerous hardware gadgets—of which a camera is the most ubiq-
uitous. The iPhone includes all of the cell phone standards, but also some neat new 
elements, as outlined in table 1.1.
Of these hardware features, the ones that really stand out are the accelerometers and 
the 
GPS
, which are not the sort of things commonly available to cell phone program-
mers. As you’ll see, they spotlight two of the elements that make the iPhone unique: 
orientation awareness and location awareness. However, before we fully explore the 
iPhone’s unique features, it’s useful to put the device in perspective by comparing the 
iPhone to the mobile state of the art.
1.2
How the iPhone compares to the industry
Although the iPhone is an innovative new technology, it also serves as a part of a 
stream of mobile development that’s been ongoing for decades. Understanding the 
iPhone’s place within the industry can help us to better understand how it’s differenti-
ated from the rest of the pack.
Table 1.1 The iPhone is full of gadgets, some of them pretty standard for a modern cell phone, but 
some more unique.
Gadget
Notes
Accelerometers
The iPhone contains three accelerometers. Their prime use is to detect an orientation 
change with relation to gravity—which is to say they sense when the iPhone is rotated 
from portrait to landscape mode or back. However, they can also be used to approxi-
mately map an iPhone’s movement through three-dimensional space. Could this make 
the iPhone the next Wii?
Bluetooth
This standard protocol for modern cell phones allows access to wireless devices. The 
iPhone uses the Bluetooth 2.0+EDR protocol. Enhanced Data Rate (EDR) allows for a 
transmission rate about triple that of older versions of Bluetooth (allowing for a 3.0 
Mbit/s signaling rate and a practical data transfer rate of 2.1 Mbit/s).
Camera
Another de facto requirement for a modern cell phone. The iPhone’s camera is 2.0 
megapixel.
GPS
The original iPhone doesn’t support real GPS, but instead offers the next best thing, 
“peer-to-peer location detection.” This faux GPS triangulates based on the relative 
locations of cell phone towers and wi-fi networks for which real GPS data exists, and 
then extrapolates the user’s location based on that. Unfortunately the accuracy can 
vary dramatically from a potential radius of several miles to several blocks; still, it’s 
better than no GPS at all.
The 3G iPhone includes a true Assisted GPS (A-GPS), which supplements normal GPS 
service with cell network information.
Although there is a difference in accuracy between the two types of GPSs, they can 
both be accessed through the iPhone SDK using the same interface.
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
changing pdf to jpg; convert pdf file into jpg format
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
convert pdf into jpg online; .pdf to jpg converter online
9
How the iPhone compares to the industry
1.2.1
The physical comparison
Physically, the iPhone is the sort of stunningly beautiful device that you’d expect from 
Apple. As we already said, it’s almost all screen, highlighting Apple’s ability to trans-
form expectations for their electronic devices.
More specifically, the iPhone has a much larger screen than most of the last-
generation cell phones, which tended to run from 320x240 pixels to 320x320 pixels 
and thus had as few as half as many pixels to play with as the iPhone. Although they 
had keyboards that were comparable with the iPhone’s on-screen keyboard, their 
mousing methods were often based around styluses or tiny trackballs or, worse, 
scrolling wheels.
We expect other cell phones to start catching up with the iPhone’s physical specs 
pretty quickly, but in the meantime Apple has used those specs to create a totally new 
cell phone experience—starting with its improved internet experience.
1.2.2
Competitive internet viewing
When compared to its last-generation competitors, the iPhone produces an internet
experience that is more usable, better integrated, and more constant than the stan-
dard mobile experience.
The improvements in usability stem from the innovative specifications that we’ve 
already seen for input, output, and networking. On the input side, you no longer have 
to use a last-generation scrolling wheel to painfully pick your way through links up 
and down a page. On the output side, pages are displayed cleanly and crisply without 
being broken into segments, thus allowing for a faster, more pleasant web experience. 
Finally, for networking, you have the relatively good speed of the 
EDGE
or 
3G
network 
combined with the ability to use lightning-fast local-area networks whenever possible. 
When compared to last-generation phones plagued by molasses-like internet connec-
tions, the change is striking.
With such a strong foundation, Apple took the next step and integrated the inter-
net into the whole iPhone experience in a way that last-generation cell phones failed 
to do. The iPhone includes a variety of standard programs such as a YouTube inter-
face, a stock program, a maps program, and a weather program that all provide seam-
less, automatic access to the internet. In addition, the 
SDK
provides simple access to 
the internet for original applications.
All this functionality is supported by a constancy of internet access that is unlike 
anything the smartphone industry has ever seen. Supplementing its wi-fi access, an 
iPhone can access the internet through cheap add-on data plans. These plans allow 
for unlimited data transfer via the web and email. Thus, users never have to think 
about the cost of browsing the web. The end result is an always-on internet that, as 
we’ll see, is another of the elements that makes the iPhone truly unique.
The Apple iPhone has brought mobile internet browsing out of the closet, a fact 
that is going to result in notable changes to current mobile web standards.
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
changing file from pdf to jpg; change file from pdf to jpg on
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
batch convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf images to jpg
10
C
HAPTER
Introducing the iPhone
1.2.3
Mobile web standards
Prior to the release of the iPhone, a number of web standards were being developed for 
smartphones. The .mobi top-level domain was launched in 2006, built on the Wireless 
Application Protocol (
WAP
) and the Wireless Markup Language (
WML
) standard for 
cut-down, mobile 
HTML
. In addition, the 
W3C
Mobile Web Initiative has begun work on 
standards such as mobile
OK
(which is meant to highlight mobile best practices). 
It is our belief that the mobile standards—and even the .mobi domain—are for the 
most part irrelevant when applied to the iPhone. We believe so because the iPhone 
provides a fully featured desktop-class browser and has vastly improved input, output, 
and networking capabilities. There are best practices for developing on the iPhone, 
and we’ll talk about some of them in upcoming chapters, but they’re not the same 
best practices required for leading-edge designs prior to 2007. As more smarter-
phones appear, we believe that the mobile standards being worked on now will quickly 
become entirely obsolete.
This is not to say, however, that the iPhone is without limitations. It does not and 
cannot provide the same experience as a desktop display, a keyboard, and a mouse. 
New mobile standards for smarterphones will exist; they’ll simply be different from 
those developed today.
Before completing our comparison of the iPhone to the rest of the industry, it’s 
important to note that the vastly improved and integrated internet access of the 
iPhone is only part of the story. 
1.2.4
The rest of the story
In 2008 Apple released the next major element in the iPhone revolution, the 
SDK
, a 
developer’s toolkit that allows programmers to create their own iPhone applications. 
Prior to the release of the 
SDK
, most cell phone development kits were proprietary 
and highly specialized. The open release of the 
SDK
could revolutionize the cell 
phone industry as much as the iPhone’s web browsing experience already has.
Even that’s not the whole story. The iPhone is an innovative product, top to bot-
tom. To further highlight how it’s grown beyond the bounds of the last-generation cell 
phone industry, we’ve identified six elements that make the iPhone truly unique.
1.3
How the iPhone is unique
The iPhone’s core uniqueness goes far beyond its powerful web browser and its tightly 
integrated web functionality. Its unique physical form and the decisions embedded in 
its software also make the device a breakthrough in cell phone technology. Six core 
ideas—most of which we’ve already hinted at—speak to the iPhone’s innovation. 
Understanding these elements (summarized in table 1.2) will help you in whatever 
type of development you’re planning.
The idea of an always-on internet is something we already touched on earlier. How-
ever what’s notable is how successful Apple has been in pushing this idea. Huge data 
transfer rates show that iPhone users are indeed always-on. In Europe, 
T-M
obile
reported that their iPhone users transferred 30 times as much data as their regular 
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Jpeg, VB.NET compress PDF, VB.NET print PDF, VB.NET merge PDF files, VB.NET view PDF online, VB.NET Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
best convert pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter online
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
convert multi page pdf to single jpg; change pdf to jpg on
11
How the iPhone is unique
users. Google has also shown a notable uptick among iPhone users, who are 50 times 
more likely to conduct a search than the average internet user. Looking at overall 
stats, the iPhone’s mobile Safari has already become the top mobile browser in the 
United States and is quickly moving up in the international market as well. Anecdotal 
evidence is consistent, as friends talk about how an iPhone user is likely at any time to 
grab his or her iPhone to look up a word in Webster’s or a topic in Wikipedia, showing 
off how the iPhone has become the encyclopedia of the 21st century for its users.
When Apple announced the iPhone, they highlighted its power consciousness. Users 
should be able to use their iPhone all day, whether they’re talking, viewing the web, or 
running native applications. Despite the higher energy costs of the 
3G
network, the 
newest iPhone still supports 5 hours of talking or 5–6 hours of web browsing. Power-
saving tricks are built deeply into the iPhone. For example, have you noticed that 
whenever you put your iPhone up to your ear, the screen goes black to conserve 
power? And that it comes back on as soon as you move the iPhone away from your 
ear? Power savings have also been built into the 
SDK
, limiting some functionality such 
as the ability to run multiple programs simultaneously in order to make sure that a 
user’s iPhone remains functional throughout the day.
Thanks to its 
GPS
(true or faux), an iPhone is location aware. It can figure out where 
a user is, and developers can design programs to take advantage of this knowledge. To 
preserve users’ privacy, however, Apple has limited what exactly programs can do with 
that knowledge.
Just as an iPhone is knowledgeable of large-scale location changes, it also recognizes 
small-scale movements, making it orientation aware. As we’ve already noted, this is thanks 
to three accelerometers within the iPhone. They don’t just detect orientation; they can 
also be used to measure gravity and movement. Although some of this functionality 
isn’t available to web apps, sophisticated input can be accessed by 
SDK
programs.
Finally we come to the iPhone’s innovative input and output. Thanks to a multi-
touch screen and a uniquely scaled screen resolution, the iPhone provides a different 
interactive experience from last-generation cell phones, so much so that we’ve 
reserved an entire section for its discussion.
Table 1.2 The iPhone has a number of unique physical and programmatic 
elements that should affect any development on the platform.
Unique Element
Summary
Always-on internet
A well-integrated, constant internet experience
Power consciousness
A device that you can use all day
Location-aware
A device that knows where it is
Orientation-aware
A device that detects movements in space
Innovative input
Finger-based mousing
Innovative output
A high-quality scalable screen
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
12
C
HAPTER
Introducing the iPhone
1.4
Understanding iPhone input and output
Although an iPhone has a native screen resolution of 480x320 pixels, web viewers 
won’t see web pages laid out at that resolution. An iPhone allows a user to touch and 
tap around pages in a way somewhat similar to mousing, but it provides notable differ-
ences from a mouse interface.
These differences highlight the final notable elements in the story of what makes 
the iPhone unique.
1.4.1
Output and iPhone viewport
When using the iPhone for most purposes, you may note that it has a 480x320 screen 
that displays very clearly. This is not a far cry from the 640x480 video displays common 
on desktop computers in the late 1980s, albeit with more colors and crispness than 
those early 
EGA
and 
VGA
displays. Thus, as we mentioned when discussing the slower 
speeds of the wide-area network, we can again fall back on the lessons of the past 
when developing for the iPhone.
The iPhone’s display becomes interesting when it’s used to view web pages, 
because the 480x320 display doesn’t show web pages at that size. Instead, by default a 
user looks at a web page that has been rendered at a resolution of 980 pixels (with a 
few exceptions, as we’ll note when talking about web development). In other words, 
it’s as if users pulled a web browser up on their computer screen that was 980 pixels 
wide, and then scaled it down by a factor of either 2:1 or 3:1—depending on the ori-
entation of the iPhone—to display at either 480 or 320 pixels wide.
This scaled view is what the iPhone calls a “viewport.” As you’ll see, viewport size 
can be set by hand as part of a web page design, forcing a page to scale either more or 
less when it’s translated onto the iPhone. However, for any web page without an 
explicit viewport command, the 980-pixel size is the default.
Realizing that most pages will scale by a factor of at least two is vital to understanding 
how web pages will look on an iPhone. In short, everything will be really, really small. 
As a result, good web development for the iPhone depends on ensuring that words and 
pictures appear at a reasonable size despite the scaling. We’ll talk about how to do that 
using the viewport command, 
CSS
tricks, and other methods in chapter 3.
And for 
SDK
developers: note this is an issue for you as well, since the 
SDK
’s 
UIWeb-
View
class scales the screen just like mobile Safari does. We’ll see the first example of 
this in chapter 11.
1.4.2
Output and orientations
We need to consider one other important element when thinking about the iPhone 
output: its ability to display in two different orientations, 480x320 or 320x480. Each 
orientation has its own advantages. The portrait orientation is great for listings, while 
the landscape orientation is often easier to read. 
Each of these orientations also shows off the iPhone’s “chrome” in a different way. 
This chrome will vary from one 
SDK
program to another, but it’s consistent when view-
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
13
Understanding iPhone input and output
ing web pages in Safari, and thus we can use the latter as an example of orientation’s 
impact on chrome, as shown in figure 1.1.
One of the interesting facts shown by this picture is that the web chrome takes up a 
larger percentage of the iPhone screen in the landscape mode than in the portrait 
mode. This is summarized in table 1.3.
The difference between the orientations isn’t nearly as bad without the 
URL
bar, 
which scrolls off the top of the screen as users move downward, but when users first 
call up a web page on the iPhone in landscape mode, they’ll only get to see a small 
percentage of it. You’ll see similar issues in your 
SDK
development too, particularly if 
you’re creating large toolbars for your applications.
Despite this limitation of landscape mode, many of the best applications will likely 
shine in that layout, as the built-in YouTube application shows.
With discussions of viewports and orientations out of the way, we’ve highlighted 
the most important unique elements of the iPhone output, but its input may be even 
more innovative.
1.4.3
Input and iPhone mousing
As already noted, the iPhone uses a multi-touch-capable capacitive touch screen. 
Users access the iPhone by tapping around with their finger. This works very differ-
ently from a mouse.
It’s perhaps most important to say, simply, that the finger is not a mouse. Generally a 
finger is going to be larger and less accurate than a more traditional pointing device. 
This disallows certain traditional types of 
UI
that depend on very precise selection. For 
Mode
Chrome % 
with URL
Chrome % 
without URL
Portrait
26%
13%
Landscape
35%
16%
status bar: 20px
URL bar: 60px
bottom bar: 44px
visible area:
320x356
Portrait Mode
status bar: 20px
URL bar: 60px
bottom bar: 32px
visible area:
480x208
Landscape Mode
Figure 1.1 The iPhone supports 
two dramatically different views, 
landscape and portrait. Choosing 
between them is not just a 
question of which is easier to read, 
but also requires thinking about 
how much of each view is taken up 
by toolbars and other chrome. 
Mobile Safari is used here as an 
example of how much room the 
chrome takes up in each display.
Table 1.3 Depending on an iPhone’s 
orientation, you’ll have different amounts 
of screen real estate available.
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
14
C
HAPTER
Introducing the iPhone
example, there are no scroll bars on the iPhone. Selecting a scroll bar with a “fat fin-
ger” would either be an exercise in frustration or would require a huge scroll bar that 
would take up a lot of the iPhone’s precious screen real estate. Apple solved this prob-
lem by allowing users to tap anywhere on an iPhone screen, then “flick” in a specific 
direction to cause scrolling.
Another interesting element of the touchscreen is shown off by the fact that the fin-
ger is not singular. Recall that the iPhone’s touchscreen is multi-touch. This allows users 
to manipulate the iPhone with multi-finger “gestures.” The “pinch” zooming of the 
iPhone is one such example. To zoom into a page, you tap two fingers on a page and 
then push them apart, while to zoom in you similarly push them together.
Finally, the finger is not persistent. A mouse pointer is always on the display, but the 
same isn’t true for a finger, which can tap here and there without going anywhere in 
between. As you’ll see, this causes issues with some traditional web techniques that 
depend on a mouse pointer moving across the screen. It also provides limitations that 
might be seen throughout 
SDK
programs. For example, there’s no standard for cut 
and paste, a pretty ubiquitous feature for any computer produced in the last couple 
of decades.
Besides resulting in some changes to existing interfaces, the iPhone’s unique input 
interface also introduces a number of new touches (one-fingered input) and gestures 
(two-fingered input), as described in table 1.4.
When you’re designing with the 
SDK
, many of the nuances of finger mousing will 
already be taken care of for you. Standard controls will be optimized for finger use, 
and you’ll have access only to the events that actually work on the iPhone. Chapter 14 
explains how to use touches, events, and actions in the 
SDK
. Even though some things 
will be taken care of for you, as an 
SDK
developer you’ll still need to change your way 
of thinking about input to better support the new device. 
When you’re developing for the web, you’ll have to be even more careful. We’ll 
return to some of the ways that you’ll have to change your web designs to account for 
finger mousing in chapter 3. You’ll also have to think about one other factor: internet 
standards. The web currently doesn’t have any paradigms for flicks and other gestures, 
Table 1.4 iPhone touches and gestures allow you to accept user input in new ways.
Input
Type
Summary
Bubble
Touch
Touch and hold. Pops up an info bubble on clickable elements.
Flick
Touch
Touch and flick. Scrolls page.
Flick, Two-Finger
Gesture
Touch and flick with two fingers. Scrolls scrollable element.
Pinch
Gesture
Move fingers in relation to each other. Zooms in or out.
Tap
Touch
A single tap. Selects.
Tap, Double
Touch
A double tap. Zooms a column.
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
15
Summary
and thus the events related to them are going to be totally new. In chapter 4 you’ll 
meet some brand-new iPhone-specific events, but they’re just the tip of the iceberg 
and it might be years before internet standards groups properly account for them.
1.5
Summary
This concludes our overview of the iPhone. Our main goals in this chapter were to 
investigate how the iPhone differs from other devices, to discover how it’s unique on 
its own, and to learn how those changes might affect development work. 
Based on what we’ve seen thus far, our biggest constraints in development will be 
the potentially slow network, the relatively small size of the iPhone screen, and the 
entirely unique input interface. Although the first two are common issues for other 
networked cell phones, the third is not. 
On the other hand, you’ve also seen the possibilities of many unique features, such 
as the iPhone’s orientation and location awareness, though you won’t get to work with 
these functions until we discuss the 
SDK
.
In the next chapter we’ll look at more of the differences between web develop-
ment and the 
SDK
so that you can better choose which of them to use for any individ-
ual development project.
Licensed to Nick Wood <nwood888@yahoo.com>
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested