download pdf using itextsharp mvc : Change pdf to jpg image control application platform web page azure asp.net web browser JF_NetworkSociety15-part1819

be made here is with policies for “activating labor,” which rose to pop-
ularity in Europe, and the UK in particular, in the early 1990s and
were instrumental in reducing long term, structural unemployment.
4
Such policies focused on the many “passive” features of the highly
regulated European labor markets, and the way these features had
contributed to a rise in the structural component of long-term unem-
ployment. “Active labor” market reforms aimed in the first instance at
reducing labor market entry barriers, and in particular low wage
unemployment traps, and increasing labor market flexibility, without
putting in jeopardy the essence of the social security protection model
typical of most European countries’ welfare systems. In countries
which went furthest ahead in such “active labor” market reforms such
as the UK, the Scandinavian countries and The Netherlands, the
result was not only a significant reduction in unemployment, but also
sometimes impressive increases in employment participation rates of
particular, underrepresented groups in the labor market which had
become “activated” such as women and youngsters. Over time and
with the formal assessment at the European level of such labor market
reform policies—the so-called Luxembourg process—active labor
market policies became a full and integral part of employment policies
in most European countries. 
The challenge today appears more or less similar, but this time with
respect to the need for “activating knowledge,” the essential ingredi-
ent for any policy aimed at increasing growth incentives in Europe. 
As noted in the Sapir report,
5
since Lisbon (March 2000) European
growth performance has been, contrary to expectations, weak, high-
lighting in particular the failure of the current European Union policy
framework to provide sufficient national as well as EU-wide growth
inducing incentives. This holds both for the Growth and Stability
Pact as well as for structural, sector specific EU policies such as the
Common Agricultural Policy or Social Cohesion Policy, which have
been poor in bringing about structural growth enhancing reform. Also
with respect to ICT use, research and development, innovation and
126
The Network Society
See in particular the OECD’s so-called Job Study(1994), which became a staunch defender
of the need for such policies in Europe. 
See Sapir, A. et al. An Agenda for a Growing Europe, The Sapir Report, Oxford University
Press, 2004.
Change pdf file to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to high quality jpg; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
Change pdf file to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
pdf to jpeg converter; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
knowledge more generally, policies pursued both in member countries
and at the EU level seem to have been dominated by the old scale
intensive industrial type, too much based on strengthening the com-
petitiveness of existing firms and sectors and too little of the growth
enhancing, innovation and creative destruction type. 
Without such specific growth enhancing policies, the restrictive
macro-economic policies introduced within the framework of the
Growth and Stability pact in the euro zone countries have, if anything,
exacerbated the “non-active” nature of knowledge activities. Under this
low growth, restrictive fiscal scenario, public knowledge funding activi-
ties such as the delivery of (highly) skilled youngsters from universities,
professional and technical high schools, or the research carried out
within universities and public research laboratories, have remained by
and large passive. Because of the lack of growth opportunities, public
research output has remained by and large unused and unexploited in
the rest of the economy and in particular the private sector. In the best
(some might say worst) case they have only contributed to efforts
abroad, i.e. to other countries through migration or through the trans-
fer of knowledge to foreign firms and universities. Private knowledge
funding activities on the other hand, due to lack of domestic growth
opportunities, have been cut, rationalized, outsourced to foreign coun-
tries, or simply frozen. The Lisbon knowledge growth challenge is
more than ever a real one: many countries particularly in continental
Europe are in danger of a long term downward adjustment to a low
knowledge intensive, low growth economy.
6
Notwithstanding what was noted above about the particular need in
continental Europe for innovative, creative destruction renewal, a policy
of “activating knowledge” should, and probably first, build on existing
strengths in knowledge creation and use. At the same time it should,
however, aim at activating competencies, risk taking and readiness to
innovate. In short, a policy aimed at activating knowledge should be
directed towards the activation of unexploited forms of knowledge. 
Innovation, Technology and Productivity
127
In a recent Dutch article, two civil servants from the M
inistry of Finance actually made
the claim that the Dutch economy has, and I quote: “no comparative advantage in high
tech goods.” Furthermore, by importing high tech goods, the Dutch economy would actu-
ally benefit much more from those foreign productivity gains. See Donders, J. en N.
Nahuis “De risico’s van kiezen,” ESB, 5 maart 2004, p.207. Similar arguments have been
made at the EU level by John Kay.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the PDF files with the
change format from pdf to jpg; best convert pdf to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert multiple page pdf to jpg; .pdf to .jpg converter online
The claim made here is that there are many of such forms, covering
the full spectrum of knowledge creation, knowledge application and
knowledge diffusion. ICT plays a crucial role in each of these areas.
Furthermore, such policies should be directed towards public knowl-
edge institutions, including higher education institutions; financial
institutions not just venture capital providers; private firms in manu-
facturing as well as services; and last but not least individuals, as entre-
preneurs, employee or employer, producer or consumer. 
In this short contribution, the focus is very much on the first of
these areas, the one governments have actually the biggest latitude for
intervention and attempting at least to activate knowledge: public
knowledge institutions. Five aspects of such knowledge investments,
which are at the heart of the Lisbon agenda, will be discussed. 
First is the issue of public investments in research and develop-
ment. In most member countries public research institutions includ-
ing universities have become increasingly under funded. “Activating”
national budgets so as to free more money for public investment in
such knowledge investments appears the easiest and most straightfor-
ward policy measure to be implemented given the commitment EU
member countries already took in Barcelona. 
Second, there is the need for improving the matching between pri-
vate and public knowledge investment efforts. Increasingly, I would
argue, European countries are confronted with a growing mismatch
between private and public research investments.
Third, there appears also an urgent need for activating research in
universities and other public research institutions in Europe. If there
is one reservoir of unused knowledge potential it is likely to be found
in those institutions. 
Fourth, policies should be designed to activate human capital and
knowledge workers. Shortages of research personnel loom large on
the European horizon. 
Fifth and foremost, there is in Europe a need for policies activating
innovation. 
Maybe there is a trade-off between innovation and creative destruc-
tion on the one hand and social security and stability on the other
128
The Network Society
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
convert pdf document to jpg; conversion of pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc. PowerPoint.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
convert pdf image to jpg image; change file from pdf to jpg
hand. But maybe existing social security policies can also become “acti-
vated” towards innovation, creative destruction, and entrepreneurship. 
1. “Activating Lisbon”: beyond the simple Barcelona targets
It was the growing awareness of Europe’s falling behind in knowl-
edge creation and knowledge diffusion which induced European heads
of state to set the objective at the Lisbon summit in March 2000 to
become the world’s most competitive and dynamic knowledge econ-
omy by 2010. The Lisbon knowledge objective were translated into
the so-called Barcelona target in the spring of 2002, whereby
European countries would aim to spend approximately 3% of their
Gross Domestic Product on investment in research, development, and
innovation by 2010, a figure comparable to the current investment
percentages in the United States and Japan. 
It is unfortunate that the European Lisbon target was so explicitly
translated into the Barcelona objective of 3%, an investment cost
objective. Equally important, if not more so, is the question what the
results—in terms of efficiency and effectiveness—of these investments
would be. Furthermore, the separation of the 3% norm into a public
component set at 1% of GDP, and a private component set at 2% of
GDP, ignored some of the more fundamental differences between the
United States (on which this separation was based) and most
European countries’ taxing regimes (neutral versus progressive) and
the implications thereof for private and public parties, and in particu-
lar the role of public authorities in the funding of research and devel-
opment. Particularly in continental European countries, it can be
expected that both enterprises and individual citizens will, given the
progressiveness of their income taxes, expect a higher contribution of
public authorities in the financing of higher education and research.
Their relatively “passive” attitude towards private investments in
knowledge (most European citizens are perfectly happy to increase
their indebtedness to acquire private property, and have large parts of
their income spent most of their working life on mortgage repay-
ments, but not to invest in their or their children’s education and
schooling) is to some extent the direct consequence of the progressive
tax regimes most middle and high income families are confronted with
over their working and family life. 
Innovation, Technology and Productivity
129
C# TIFF: How to Use C#.NET Code to Compress TIFF Image File
C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object. List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); / Step1: Load image to REImage object. foreach (string file in
pdf to jpg; to jpeg
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add PDFDocument(images.ToArray()); / Save document to a file. Program.RootPath + "\\output.pdf"; doc.Save
batch pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf file to jpg online
To aim for a double effort of the private sector compared to the
public one in knowledge investment is to ignore the different role of
public authorities in Europe as opposed to the U.S. Furthermore,
given the relatively limited leeway European public authorities have in
inducing private firms to increase their R&D investments (the only
feasible instrument: national R&D tax advantages contains substantial
beggar-thy-neighbour elements in it and is likely to become increas-
ingly challenged at the European court level), the Barcelona target
appears ultimately a rather weak policy “focusing device” on the road
to Lisbon. 
Nevertheless, attainment of the public funding target of 1% 
of GDP in so far as it is something practical governments can do,
could be elevated to an absolute minimum policy priority. How to
achieve this within the current, highly restrictive budgetary frame-
work conditions of most EU member countries? By “activating
national budgets” in a growth enhancing direction, one could argue,
redirecting government expenditures towards such knowledge invest-
ments, just as the Sapir report forcefully argued with respect to the
EU budget. 
But as will also be clear from what was said before, the setting 
of simplistic target objectives in the area of knowledge dynamics 
and innovation, even limited to the public sector, raises many 
questions.
First and foremost, there are factual questions. How real is the
knowledge gap? The Barcelona target only addressed one highly
imperfect, knowledge input indicator: R&D expenditures. Firms are
not interested in increasing R&D expenditures just for the sake of it
but because they expect new production technology concepts, new
products responding to market needs, to improve their own efficiency
or strengthen their competitiveness. If at all possible, firms will actu-
ally try to license such technologies or alternatively outsource at least
part of the most expensive knowledge investments to suppliers of
machinery, rather than have to forego themselves those costly invest-
ments. Today most firms are actually keen on increasing the efficiency
of R&D by rationalizing, or reducing the risks involved in carrying
out R&D, outsourcing it to separate small high tech companies which
operate at arms length but can be taken over, once successful.
Furthermore industrial R&D investment on which the Barcelona tar-
130
The Network Society
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
convert pdf into jpg format; convert pdf to jpg for online
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG
convert pdf photo to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg
gets are based is heavily biased in favour of industrial production.
Service sectors but also more engineering based activities are likely to
be strongly underrepresented. As a result, the question about the
“real” knowledge gap of Europe with respect to the U.S. remains very
much subject to debate. 
Central in this debate is the extent to which the commercial bene-
fits of knowledge investments can be appropriated and by whom—the
firm within the sector having made the R&D efforts, or a firm
upstream or downstream? Or the final consumer, imitation taking
place so quickly that none of the new product rents could be appropri-
ated by the innovator? 
It might well be that sectors and activities with little registered
R&D-effort have a complex and actually deep knowledge base. Some
of the most competitive European industries e.g., the offshore and
dredge industry, the food processing, finance or insurance industry,
carry out little if no R&D. According to OECD classifications, these
are typically medium to low-technology industries. The knowledge
bases appropriate to these industries display, however, great technical
depth and variety. The list of institutions providing support and devel-
opment of these different knowledge bases is similarly long and
diverse. Thus a low-R&D industry may well be a major user of knowl-
edge generated elsewhere. The same holds of course for many service
sectors, where the introduction of new process or organizational
structures as well as new product innovations, is unlikely to involve
much formal R&D investment. But here too, the crucial question will
be the extent to which such innovations can be easily imitated or can
be formally protected through trademarks, copyrights or other forms
of intellectual property, or kept secret. 
The same argument holds at the international level. Again the cen-
tral question will be whether the commercial benefits of knowledge
investments can be appropriated domestically or are “leaking” else-
where, to other countries. In the economic growth literature, the phe-
nomenon of catching-up growth is typically characterized by lagging
countries benefiting from the import, transfer of technology and
knowledge, formally and particularly informally. In the current,
increasingly global world economy, increasing R&D investment is
hence unlikely to benefit only the domestic economy. This holds a for-
teriorifor the EU with its twenty five independent member countries.
Innovation, Technology and Productivity
131
Thus, as highlighted by Meister and Verspagen (2003), achieving the
3% Barcelona target by 2010 is not really going to reduce the income
gap with the U.S., the benefits of the increased R&D efforts not only
accruing to Europe but also to the U.S. and the rest of the world. 
In a similar vein, Griffith, Harrison and Van Reenen (2004) have
illustrated how the U.S. innovation boom of the 1990s had major 
benefits for the UK economy, and in particular for UK firms that 
had shifted their R&D to the U.S. A UK firm shifting 10% of its
innovative activity to the U.S. from the UK while keeping its 
overall level the same, would be associated with an additional increase
in productivity of about 3%. “This effect is of the same order of mag-
nitude as that of a doubling in its R&D stock” (Griffith et al. 2004,
p.25). 
In short, the link between the location of “national” firms’ private
R&D activities and national productivity gains is, in the current,
increasingly global R&D world, at best tenuous.
To conclude this first section: achieving the Barcelona target should
be brought back to what governments can practically achieve in the
area of knowledge investment. Setting a common European target,
such as the Barcelona one, can be useful if, but only if, it sharpens pol-
icy priorities. The current translation of those targets in public and
private targets does anything but sharpen policy priorities. On the
contrary, the debate on government expenditures in the euro zone
countries is completely dominated by the other European 3% fiscal
norm. That norm provides, however, no incentive to redirect public
funding in the direction of knowledge enhancing investments. The
most immediate measure policy makers should take is to reform their
budget priorities in the direction of knowledge enhancing growth
activities by raising as a minimum the public funding of R&D to the
1% of GDP level. 
2. Activating the “joint production” of knowledge:
attracting private R&D
Knowledge production is typically characterized by so-called “joint
production” features: what modern growth economists have described
as the increasing returns features of knowledge growth accumulation.
In more down to earth terminology, knowledge investments by both
132
The Network Society
private and public authorities have been characterized by strong com-
plementarities and from a geographical perspective strong agglomera-
tion features. In most continental European countries this led over the
postwar period to a rapid catching up in public and private R&D
7
investments, particularly by large domestic firms in their home coun-
try. Such investments were often rather closely in line with national
public R&D investments. In the late 1970s and early 1980s most
European countries had actually caught up with the U.S. in private
R&D investment. Technical high schools and universities were often
closely integrated in this privately led knowledge investment growth
path. This “national champion” led R&D catching up process led
actually to a strong “over-concentration” of domestic R&D invest-
ments of such firms in their country of origin, certainly when com-
pared to their international production activities. Along with the
further internationalization (and ‘Europeanization’ in the running up
to the 1992 European single market) of production, R&D investments
became also more subject to internationalization. Initially, this was
limited to R&D activities strongly linked to the maintenance and
adjustment of production processes and product technology to the
foreign market conditions, later on it involved also more fundamental
research activities. 
In short, a sheer natural trend towards the international spread of
private R&D of the large European multinationals took place, on
which much of individual member countries’ knowledge strength had
been built. By the same token, many of the close domestic connec-
tions between private and local public research institutions became
weaker. This process is far from over, given the still wide disparities in
the concentration of domestic R&D versus international sales. At the
same time the renewal rate of R&D intensive firms in Europe was
particularly poor. The rapid growth in the gap in the 1990s between
the total amount of R&D spent by private firms in Europe and by pri-
vate firms in the U.S., is a reflection of this lack in renewal of high
growth firms in Europe as compared to the U.S., as illustrated in
Figure 4.1 below. 
Innovation, Technology and Productivity
133
The UK’s R&D spending remained in the early postwar period at a much higher level,
more or less in line with that of the U.S., than that of most continental European coun-
tries primarily as a result of the large government spending in the military, aerospace
industries and other public utilities sectors. 
Figure 4.1 1 EU and US firms’renewal in the post-war period
It is worthwhile noting that the gap between Europe and the U.S.
in privately financedR&D, as illustrated in Figure 4.2a, is first and
foremost a gap in R&D performedin the private sector (Figure 4.2b),
i.e. R&D carried out in the private sector but funded both by private
as well as public funds (including in the latter case in the U.S. prima-
rily military R&D). Actually with respect to R&D performedin the
public sector, there is no gap between Europe and the U.S., yet there
remains a substantial gap in publicly financedR&D. The widening of
the EU-U.S. gap over the 1990s between privately performedR&D
suggests that firms under the pressure of internationalization increas-
ingly turned their back on national European public research insti-
tutes and concentrated rather their R&D activities elsewhere in the
world, and particularly in the U.S. Surprisingly since 2000, the gap
between the U.S. and the EU has actually declined significantly.
However, this decline is first and foremost the result of a decline in
the R&D performed in the business sector in the U.S. 
Universities and other public research institutes in Europe, under
funded, failed by and large, and in contrast to their counterparts in the
U.S., to provide the attractor pole to European (and foreign) firms for
134
The Network Society
Since 1980
1950 - 1979
Before 1950
EU
USA
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
p
e
r
c
e
n
t
(
%
)
joint knowledge production—a role they actually fulfilled for many
years within their secure national “cocooning” borders. It seems hence
reasonable to conclude that Europe suffered from the fragmentation of
what were relatively closed national, joint production R&D systems,
with national R&D champions internationalizing their R&D activities
due to both internal EU pressures in the late 1980s and external com-
petition pressures in the 1990s, while public research institutions
remained incapable of providing sufficient private R&D renewal. 
Figure 4.2A A Gap in EU25—US R&D spending
3. Activating university and fundamental research
The internationalization process described above has also been
accompanied by a process of “crowding out” of fundamental, basic
research from private firms’ R&D activities. This process took place in
most large firms in the 1980s and found its most explicit expression in
the reorganization of R&D activities, from often autonomous labora-
tories directly under the responsibility of the Board of Directors in the
1960s to more decentralized R&D activities integrated and fully part of
separate business units. Today only firms in the pharmaceutical sector
Innovation, Technology and Productivity
135
Industry
(BERD)
Government
(GOVERD)
Universities
(HERD)
Other
(PNP)
2
1
0
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
1995
B
i
l
l
i
o
n
s
2
0
0
0
P
P
P
d
o
l
l
a
r
s
(
$
)
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003*
Source: OECD-MSTI. 2003* MERIT estimate
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested