There is in other words an urgent need for a complete rethought of
the universality of the social security systems in Europe, recognizing
explicitly that depending on the kind of work citizens get involved in,
social achievements including employment security, a relatively short
working life and short weekly working hours are important social
achievements and elements of the quality of life, which should not be
given up, and the case, probably exemplified by the highly qualified
researcher, where exactly the opposite holds. It is in other words
urgent time to broaden the discussions in science, technology and
innovation policy circles to include social innovation. 
146
The Network Society
Convert .pdf to .jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert .pdf to .jpg online; change pdf to jpg image
Convert .pdf to .jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
pdf to jpeg converter; best pdf to jpg converter online
Part III
Organizational Reform and
Technological Modernization
in the Public Sector
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
batch pdf to jpg converter online; change file from pdf to jpg on
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf file to jpg format; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
.net pdf to jpg; pdf to jpg converter
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
best pdf to jpg converter; changing file from pdf to jpg
Central Issues in the Political
Development of the Virtual State
Jane E. Fountain
Introduction
The term “virtual state” is a metaphor meant to draw attention to
the structures and processes of the state that are becoming more and
more deeply designed with digital information and communication
systems. Digitalization of information and communication allows the
institutions of the state to rethink the location of data, decision mak-
ing, services and processes to include not only government organiza-
tions but also nonprofits and private firms. I have called states that
make extensive use of information technologies virtual statesto high-
light what may be fundamental changes in the nature and structure of
the state in the information age.
This chapter discusses the technology enactment framework, an
analytical framework to guide exploration and examination of infor-
mation-based change in governments.
1
The original technology
enactment framework is extended in this chapter to delineate the dis-
tinctive roles played by key actors in technology enactment. I then
examine institutional change in government by drawing from current
initiatives in the U.S. federal government to build cross-agency rela-
tionships and systems. The U.S. government is one of the first central
states to undertake not only back office integration within the govern-
ment but also integration of systems and processes across agencies.
For this reason its experience during the past ten years may be of
Chapter 5
The technology enactment model and detailed case studies illustrating the challenges of
institutional change may be found in J.E. Fountain, Building the Virtual State: Information
Technology and Institutional Change(Brookings Institution Press, 2001). The present paper
draws from the explanation of the technology enactment model in Building the Virtual
State and presents new empirical research on current, major e-government initiatives in
the U.S. central government. 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
.pdf to jpg; convert pdf pictures to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
.net convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg file
interest to e-government researchers and decision makers in other
countries, particularly those in countries whose governments are likely
to pursue similar experiments in networked governance. The sum-
mary of cross-agency projects presented here introduces an extensive
empirical study, currently in progress, of these projects and their
implications for governance. 
A structural and institutional approach that begins with processes
of organizational and cultural change, as decisionmakers experience
them, offers a fruitful avenue to understanding and influencing the
beneficial use of technology for governance. Focusing on technologi-
cal capacity and information systems alone neglects the interdepen-
dencies between organizations and technological systems. Information
and communication technologies are embedded and work within and
across organizations. For this reason, it is imperative to understand
organizational structures, processes, cultures and organizational
change in order to understand, and possibly influence, the path of
technology use in governance. Accounts of bureaucratic resistance,
user resistance and the reluctance of civil servants to engage in inno-
vation oversimplify the complexities of institutional change. 
One of the most important observers of the rise of the modern
state, Max Weber, developed the concept of bureaucracy that guided
the growth of enterprise and governance during the past approxi-
mately one hundred years. The Weberian democracy is characterized
by hierarchy, clear jurisdiction, meritocracy and administrative neu-
trality, and decisionmaking guided by rules which are documented and
elaborated through legal and administrative precedent. His concept of
bureaucracy remains the foundation for the bureaucratic state, the
form that every major state—democratic or authoritarian—has
adopted and used throughout the Twentieth Century. New forms of
organization that will be used in the state require a similar working
out of the principals of governance that should inhere in structure,
design and process. This challenge is fundamental to understanding e-
government in depth. 
Throughout the past century, well-known principles of public
administration have stated that administrative behavior in the state
must satisfy the dual requirements of capacity and control. Capacity
indicates the ability of an administrative unit to achieve its objectives
efficiently. Control refers to the accountability that civil servants and
150
The Network Society
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Jpeg, VB.NET compress PDF, VB.NET print PDF, VB.NET merge PDF files, VB.NET view PDF online, VB.NET Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
convert pdf file into jpg format; convert pdf into jpg
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
convert pdf picture to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg on
the bureaucracy more generally owe to higher authorities in the legis-
lature, notably to elected representatives of the people. Democratic
accountability, at least since the Progressives, has relied upon hierar-
chical control—control by superiors of subordinates along a chain of
command that stretches from the apex of the organization, the politi-
cally appointed agency head (and beyond to the members of
Congress) down to operational level employees. 
The significance and depth of effects of the Internet in governance
stem from the fact that information and communication technologies
have the potential to affect production(or capacity) as well as coordination,
communication, and control. Their effects interact fundamentally with the
circulatory, nervous, and skeletal system of institutions. Information
technologies affect not simply production processes in and across
organizations and supply chains. They also deeply affect coordination,
communication and control—in short, the fundamental nature of
organizations. I have argued that the information revolution is a revolu-
tion in terms of the significance of its effects rather than its speed. This
is because the effects of IT on governance are playing out slowly, per-
haps on the order of a generation (or approximately 25 years). Rather
than changes occurring at “Internet speed,” to use a popular phrase of
the 1990s, governments change much more slowly. This is not only due
to lack of market mechanisms that would weed out less competitive
forms. It is significantly attributable to the complexities of government
bureaucracies and their tasks as well as to the importance of related gov-
ernance questions—such as accountability, jurisdiction, distributions of
power, and equity—that must be debated, contested and resolved. 
In states that have developed a professional, reasonably able civil
service, public servants (working with appointed and elected govern-
ment officials and experts from private firms and the academy) craft
the details and carry out most of the work of organizational and insti-
tutional transformation. What is the transformation process by which
new information and communication technologies become embedded
in complex institutions? Who carries out these processes? What roles
do they play? Answers to such questions are of critical importance if
we are to understand, and to influence, technology-based transforma-
tions in governance. Government decisionmakers acting in various
decisionmaking processes produce decisions and actions that result in
the building of the virtual state. 
Central Issues in the Political Development of the Virtual State
151
Career civil servants redesign structures, processes, practices,
norms, communication patterns and the other elements of knowledge
management in government. Career civil servants are not impedi-
ments to change, as some critics have argued. They are key players in
government reform. An extended example may be drawn from the
experiences of civil servants in the U.S. federal government beginning
in approximately 1993. Working with political appointees and outside
experts, career civil servants worked out the details critical to the suc-
cess of several innovations that otherwise would not have been trans-
lated from their private sector beginnings to the organizations of the
state.
2
Over time, as their mentality and culture has begun to change,
a cadre of superior civil servants have become the chief innovators in
the government combining deep knowledge of policy and administra-
tive processes with deep understanding of public service and the con-
straints it imposes on potential design choices. Their involvement is
critical not simply as the “users” of technology but as the architects of
implementation, operationally feasible processes and politically sus-
tainable designs.
Technology Enactment
Many social and information scientists have examined the effects of
the Internet and related ICTs on organizations and on government.
Yet the results of such research often have been mixed, contradictory
and inconclusive. Researchers have observed that the same informa-
tion system in different organizational contexts leads to different
results. Indeed, the same system might produce beneficial effects in
one setting and negative effects in a different setting. This stream of
research, focused on effects and outcomes, neglects the processes of
transformation by which such systems come to be embedded in organ-
izations. Because these processes may develop over several years, they
cannot be considered transitional or temporary. Transformation
becomes the more or less constant state of administrative and govern-
mental life.
152
The Network Society
Many of these innovative developments are presented in the cases included in Building the
Virtual State. See, for example, the cases concerning the development of the International
Trade Data System, the U.S. Business Advisor, and battlefield management systems in the
U.S. Army.
The technology enactment framework emphasizes the influences of
organizational structures (including “soft” structures such as behav-
ioral patterns and norms) on the design, development, implementa-
tion and use of technology. In many cases, organizations enact
technologies to reinforce the political status quo. Technology enact-
ment often (but not always) refers to the tendency of actors to imple-
ment new ICTs in ways that reproduce, indeed strengthen,
institutionalized socio-structural mechanisms even when such enact-
ments lead to seemingly irrational and sub-optimal use of technology.
One example include websites for which navigation is a mystery
because the organization of the website mirrors the (dis)organization
of the actual agency. Another example are online transactions that are
designed to be nearly as complex as their paper-based analogues. A
third example is the cacophony of websites that proliferate when every
program, every project and every amateur HTML enthusiast in an
organization develops a web presence. These early stage design
choices tend to pave paths whose effects may influence the develop-
ment of a central government over long periods of time because of the
economic and political costs of redesign. 
The underlying assumptions of designers play a key role in the type
of systems developed and the way in which systems are enacted in
government. The Japanese government, known for planning and
coherence of response, is currently engaged in development of a
national strategy for e-government. This response is distinctly differ-
ent from a bottom-up approach in which innovation from the grass-
roots of the bureaucracy is encouraged. The U.S. Army’s design of the
maneuver control system, a relatively early form of automated battle-
field management, developed in the 1980s and 1990s, was developed
with the assumption on the part of system designers that soldiers are
“dumb” operators, button pushers with little understanding of their
operations. When much of the detailed information soldiers used by
soldiers for decisionmaking was embedded in code and made inacces-
sible to them, there were substantial negative effects on the opera-
tional capacity of the division.
3
Central Issues in the Political Development of the Virtual State
153
This case is reported in detail in Building the Virtual State, chapter 10. 
Figure 5.1 1 The Technology Enactment Framework
Source: J. . E. . Fountain, 
B
u
i
l
d
i
n
g
t
h
e
V
i
r
t
u
a
l
S
t
a
t
e
:
I
n
f
o
r
m
a
t
i
o
n
T
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
y
a
n
d
I
n
s
t
i
t
u
t
i
o
n
a
l
C
h
a
n
g
e
(Washington, D.C.:Brookings Institution Press, 2001), p.91.
I developed the technology enactment framework (presented in the
figure above) as a result of extensive empirical research on the behav-
ior of career civil servants and political appointees as they made deci-
sions regarding the design and use of ICTs in government. If
information technology is better theorized and incorporated into 
the central social science theories that guide thinking about how gov-
ernment works, researchers will possess more powerful tools for
explanation and prediction. In other words, theory should guide
understanding of the deep effects of ICTs on organizational, institu-
tional and social rule systems in government which is not ordered by
the invisible hand of the market. 
The most important conceptual distinction regarding ICTs is the
distinction between “objective” and “enacted” technology depicted in
154
The Network Society
Objective
Information
Technologies
• Internet
• Other digital
telecommunica-
tions
• Hardware
• Software
Organizational
Forms
B
u
r
e
a
u
c
r
a
c
y
• Hierarchy
• Jurisdiction
• Standardization
• Rules, files
• Stability
N
e
t
w
o
r
k
s
• Trust v. exchange
• Social capital
• Interoperability
• Pooled resources
• Access to
knowledge
Enacted
Technologies
• Perceptions
• Design
• Implementation
• Use
Outcomes
• Indeterminate
• Multiple
• Unanticipated
• Influenced by
rational, social,
and political
logics
• May be
suboptimal
Institutional Arrangements
(Types of Embeddedness)
• Cognitive
• Socio-structural
• Cultural
• Legal and formal
the figure using two separate boxes separated by a group of mediating
variables.
4
By objective technology, I mean hardware, software, tele-
communication and other material systems as they exist apart from
the ways in which people use them. For example, one can discuss the
memory of a computer, the number of lines of code in a software pro-
gram, or the functionality of an application. By “enacted technology,”
I refer to the way that a system is actually used by actors in an organi-
zation. For example, in some organizations email systems are designed
to break down barriers between functions and hierarchical levels.
Other organizations may use the same system of email to reinforce
command and control channels. In some cases firms use information
systems to substitute expert labor for much cheaper labor by embed-
ding as much knowledge as possible in systems and by routinizing
tasks to drive out variance. In other cases firms use information sys-
tems to extend their human capital and to add to the creativity and
problem solving ability of their employees. Many organizations have
taken a plethora of complex and contradictory forms, put them into
pdf format and uploaded them to the web, where they can be down-
loaded, filled out by hand and FAXed or mailed for further processing.
Yet other organizations have redesigned their business processes to
streamline such forms, to develop greater web-based interactivity, 
particularly for straightforward, simple transactions and processes.
These organizations have use ICTs as a catalyst to transform the
organization. Thus, there is a great distinction between the objective
properties of ICTs and their embeddedness in ongoing, complex
organizations.
Two of the most important influences on technology enactment are
organizations and networks. These appear as mediating variables in
the framework depicted in the figure above. These two organizational
forms are located together in the framework because public servants
currently are moving between these two types of organization. On the
one hand, they work primarily in bureaucracies (ministries or agen-
cies) in order to carry out policymaking and service delivery activities.
Central Issues in the Political Development of the Virtual State
155
In this conceptualization I draw from and extend a long line of theory and research in the
sociology of technology, history of science, and social constructivist accounts of technolog-
ical development. What is new in my approach is the synthesis of organizational and insti-
tutional influences, a focus on power and its distribution, and a focus on the dialectical
tensions of operating between two dominant forms: bureaucracy and network.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested