On the other hand, public managers are increasingly invited to work
across agencies and across public, private and nonprofit sectors—in
networks—to carry out the work of government. Thus, these two
major organizational forms, and their respective logics, heavily influ-
ence the ways in which technologies in the state will be designed,
implemented and used. 
As shown in the figure, four types of institutional influences under-
gird the process of enactment and strongly influence thinking and
action.
5
Cognitive institutionsrefer to mental habits and cognitive mod-
els that influence behavior and decisionmaking. Cultural institutions
refer to the shared symbols, narratives, meanings and other signs that
constitute culture. Socio-structural institutionsrefer to the social and
professional networked relationships among professionals that con-
strain behavior through obligations, history, commitments, and shared
tasks. Governmental institutions, in this framework, denote laws and
governmental rules that constrain problem solving and decisionmak-
ing. These institutions play a significant role in technology enactment
even as they themselves are influenced, over the long run, by techno-
logical choices.
Note that causal arrows in the technology enactment framework
flow in both directions to indicate that recursive relationships domi-
nate among technology, organizational forms, institutions, and enact-
ment outcomes. The term “recursive” as it is used by organization
theorists means that influence or causal connections flow in all direc-
tions among the variables. This term is meant to differentiate recur-
sive relationships from uni-directional relationships in which, for
example, variable A leads to variable B. For example, smoking leads to
cancer. But cancer does not lead to smoking. In a recursive relation-
ship, variable A and variable B influence one another. For example,
use of ICTs influences governance. And governance structures,
processes, politics and history influence the use of ICTs. Recursive
relationships specified in the technology enactment framework do not
predict outcomes. Rather, they “predict” uncertainty, unanticipated
results and iteration back through design, implementation and use as
organizations and networks learn from experience how to use new
156
The Network Society
I am indebted to Professors Paul DiMaggio and Sharon Zukin for this typology of institu-
tional arrangements.
C# convert pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
conversion of pdf to jpg; convert pdf page to jpg
C# convert pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
changing pdf to jpg file; convert .pdf to .jpg
technologies even as they incur sunk costs and develop paths that may
be difficult to change. The analytical framework presents a dynamic
process rather than a predictive theory.
An extension of the model, presented in the figure below, high-
lights the distinctive roles played by three groups: IT specialists in the
career civil service, program and policy specialists and other govern-
ment officials at all levels from executive to operational, and vendors
and consultants. 
Figure 5.2 2 Key Actors in Technology Enactment
Copyright:Jane Fountain and Brookings Institution Press, 2001.Revisions by Hirokazu
Okumura, 2004.
Central Issues in the Political Development of the Virtual State
157
Objective
IT
Organizational
Forms
B
u
r
e
a
u
c
r
a
c
y
• Hierarchy
• Jurisdiction
• Standardization
• Rules, files
• Stability
N
e
t
w
o
r
k
s
• Trust v. exchange
• Social capital
• Interoperability
• Pooled resources
• Access to
knowledge
Enacted
Technologies
• Perceptions
• Design
• Implementation
• Use
Outcomes
• Indeterminate
• Multiple
• Unanticipated
• Influenced by
rational, social,
and political
logics
• May be
suboptimal
Institutional
Arrangements
• Cognitive
• Cultural
• Socio-structural
• Legal and formal
Actors Group A
• Vendors
• Consultants
Actors Group B
• CIO
• Decison makers
of IT systems
Actors Group C
• Policy makers
• Managers,
Adminiatrators
• Operators, Workers
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
So, feel free to convert them too with our tool. Easy converting! If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge
convert multiple pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
reader pdf to jpeg; .pdf to jpg converter online
The three groups of actors play distinctive but inter-related roles in
technology enactment. Actors in group A, comprised of vendors and
consultants, are largely responsible for objective technology. Their
expertise often lies in identification of the appropriate functionality
and system architecture for a given organizational mission and set of
business processes. What is critical for government is that vendors and
consultants fully understand the political and governance obligations
as well as the mission and tasks of a government agency before making
procurement and design decisions. It is essential to understand the
context and “industry” of government, just as one would have to learn
the intricacies of any complex industry sector. Just as the information
technology sector differs from the retail, manufacturing, and the serv-
ice sectors, so the government sector exists in a unique environment.
Within government as well are varying policy domains and branches
whose history, political constraints, and environments are important
to understand. 
Actors in group B, according to this model, include chief informa-
tion officers of agencies and key IT decisionmakers. These govern-
ment actors bear primary responsible for detailed decisions of system
design. Actors in group C—policymakers, managers, administrators,
operators, and workers—have a strong, often unappreciated and over-
looked, influence on adjustments to organizational and network struc-
tures and processes. It is imperative that some members of this 
group develop expertise in the strategic uses of ICTs in order to bridge
technological, political and programmatic logics. These depictions
simplify the complexities of actual governments and the policymaking
process. They are meant to draw attention to the multiple roles
involved in enactment and the primary points of influence exerted
through each role. In particular, the relationships between groups 
B and C are often neglected when, in fact, they are crucial for success
of projects.
Propositions
Six propositions may be derived logically from the technology
enactment framework and the political environment that exists in
most industrialized democracies. 
158
The Network Society
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
it as easy as possible to convert your PDF XDoc.PDF for .NET) supports converting PDF document to in .NET developing platforms using simple C# programming code
reader convert pdf to jpg; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
bulk pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf to jpeg
Proposition 1: Perverse incentives
Public servants face a set of perverse incentives as they make deci-
sions regarding the possible uses of technology in their programs and
agencies. Public executives in most states try to accumulate larger
budgets and more staff in order to increase the power and autonomy of
their department. They learn to negotiate successfully for appropria-
tions for their program and agency. In the theory of adversarial democ-
racy, such conflicts among programs and agencies are assumed to force
public servants to sharpen their arguments and rationales for pro-
grams. This competition of ideas and programs is meant to simulate a
market from which elected officials can choose thereby producing the
best results for citizens. The adversarial model of democracy makes the
development of networked approaches to government difficult. The
impasse can be broken only by significant restructuring of incentives to
dampen unwieldy tendencies toward agency autonomy and growth.
For this reason, public executives face perverse incentives. If they
implement new information systems that are more efficient, they will
not gain greater resources; they will probably enact a situation in
which their budget is decreased. If they implement information sys-
tems that reduce redundancies across agencies and programs, once
again, they are likely to lose resources rather than to gain them. If
they develop inter-agency and enterprise-wide systems with their col-
leagues in the bureaucracy, they will lose autonomy rather than gain-
ing it. So the traditional incentives by which public executives have
worked are “perverse” incentives for networked governance.
Proposition 2: Vertical Structures
The bureaucratic state, following from the Weberian bureaucracy,
is organized vertically. By that I mean that the government is organ-
ized in terms of superior-subordinate relations, a chain of command
that extends from the chief executive to the lowest level employees of
the government. Similarly, oversight bodies for budgeting, accounta-
bility and even for legislation exercise oversight through the chain of
command structure. These vertical structures are the chief structural
elements of government institutions. Incentives for performance are
derived from this structure. This verticality, central to accountability
and transparency, also makes it difficult and to use technology to build
Central Issues in the Political Development of the Virtual State
159
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc. PowerPoint.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.TIFF.dll. C# Image Convert: Tiff to Png.
advanced pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf file into jpg
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. C# class source codes and online demos are provided for .NET.
c# pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg
networked government. The more complex difficulties are not techni-
cal. In fact, it is rather easy to imagine how a federal enterprise archi-
tecture should be designed. What is difficult is reconceptualizing
accountability, oversight, and other basic elements of governance in
networked relationships.
Proposition 3: Misuse of capital/labor substitution
In the U.S. federal government, agencies were not allocated signifi-
cant new resources to develop IT. Congress has assumed that the use
of ICTs to substitute for labor would generate resources for techno-
logical innovation. Although labor costs can be reduced by using IT,
there are a few complexities that should be enumerated here. 
First, organizations must learn to use IT. This requires human labor
and experienced human labor is critical. It is difficult to downsize and
to learn at the same time regardless of popular management impera-
tives to force employees to innovate through large-scale cutbacks. 
Second, although some jobs can be eliminated through the use of
ICTs, e-government necessitates many new and expensive jobs.
Specifically, IT positions must be created for intelligent operation of
systems, for monitoring and protecting data and processes, and for
redesigning processes as legislation and programs change.
Outsourcing is an option, but is nonetheless expensive and cannot
completely replace an internal IT staff. Large organizations have
found that IT staffs are expensive. In particular, website content
requires labor-intensive attention; protection of privacy and data secu-
rity in government exceeds industry standards and practices; and some
degree of institutional memory and knowledge for networked gover-
nance must reside within the permanent civil service rather than in a
plethora of contracts. By placing critical strategic knowledge in the
hands of contractors, governments put themselves in the position of
having to pay for this knowledge multiple times and lose the possibil-
ity to leverage this knowledge internally for innovation. Asset specific
technological knowledge should reside within governments and must
be viewed as a necessary cost of e-government. 
Third, the U.S. government has made a commitment to provide
public services through multiple channels: face-to-face, telephone,
mail, and Internet. Thus, they are faced with the strategic and opera-
160
The Network Society
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. Firstly, you may use following C# sample code to transform string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C
change pdf to jpg; convert pdf pages to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
convert pdf file to jpg; .pdf to .jpg online
tional complexities of designing, developing, implementing and man-
aging across multiple channels. For these reasons, and others, the sim-
ple idea of substituting technology for labor is misleading and
erroneous. In Portugal, it seems necessary to continue to employ mul-
tiple channels for services given the demographic differences in
Internet use. Here the social decision to respect the elderly population
should dominate over technological possibilities for e-government.
Other Iberian states have simply eliminated paper-based channels in
order to move the population to e-government. 
Proposition 4: Outsourcing may appear to be easier than
integration
It may appear to political decisionmakers that it is easier to out-
source operations than it is for government managers to negotiate the
politics of integration, that is, information sharing and working across
agencies. In other words, there is a danger that some services and sys-
tems will be outsourced in order to avoid the political difficulties of
internal governmental integration of back office functions or cross
agency functions. But in some cases, outsourcing would be a mistake
because the negotiations within the government necessary for integra-
tion to move forward form a necessary process of learning and cultural
change, through enacting technology. The arduous process of making
new systems fit the political, policy and operational needs of the gov-
ernment is, itself, the transformation of the state toward a new form
coherent with the information society. Outsourcing may appear to be
the easier course of action. But ultimately states must make difficult
decisions regarding asset specificity, that is, the knowledge and skills
that should reside within the government.
Proposition 5: Customer service strategies in government
Governments have an obligation to provide services to the public.
But this is one element of the relationship between state and society.
First, customers are in a different relationship with firms than citizens
are with government.
6
Customers have several options in the market;
Central Issues in the Political Development of the Virtual State
161
See J. E. Fountain, “The Paradoxes of Customer Service in the Public Sector,” Governance,
2001, for an extended analysis of differences between customer service strategies in eco-
nomic firms and their use in government. In this working paper I simply mention a few of
the more important arguments published previously.
citizens have but one option for government services and obligations.
Customers pay for services; but citizens have a deeper relationship and
great responsibility toward their government than a fee for service
relationship. They do not pay taxes in exchange for services. Tax sys-
tems in most states are a form of redistribution, a material system that
reflects a social and political contract. In a democratic system of gov-
ernment “of the people, by the people, and for the people,” citizens
have deep obligations to government and governments have deep
obligations to the polity. So the customer service metaphor, particu-
larly in its most marketized forms, is a degradation, minimization, and
perversion of the state-citizen relationship in democracies. 
Second, in the private sector, larger and wealthier customers are
typically given better treatment than those customers who have little
purchasing power or who have not done business with a firm in the
past. Market segmentation is critical to service strategies in firms but is
not morally or ethically appropriate for governments. Moreover, cus-
tomer service strategies in U.S. firms tend to reward those customers
who complain with better service in order to “satisfy” the customer.
Those customers who do not complain do not receive better service.
This, again, is not morally or ethically appropriate for government.
Some citizens cannot exercise voice, or articulate their needs, as well as
others. Public servants have an obligation to provide services equitably
regardless of the education, wealth, or language skills of the citizen.
As the U.S. government tried to adopt some of the customer serv-
ice ideas that were popular in economic firms, they did increase
responsiveness to citizens. Moreover, public servants experienced a
deep change in their attitudes and behavior. In many cases, the culture
of agencies and programs changed to become oriented toward citizens
rather than toward the internal bureaucratic needs of agencies. These
were positive benefits from the customer service metaphor. 
But some corporate citizens exploited the notion of customer serv-
ice to extract benefits from the state. Powerful corporate citizens used
“customer service” as a way to pressure agencies to provide benefits
and to develop policies and rules that were inequitable and that would
advantage some firms or industries over others. Ford Motors,
Motorola, and Cisco are indeed large “customers” of the U.S. govern-
ment. But the regulatory regimes developed for industries cannot
serve some “customers” better than others. At the corporate level, the
162
The Network Society
customer service metaphor breaks down as a normative force. For
these reasons, the Bush Administration discontinued the use of “cus-
tomer service” as a government strategy. They use the term “citizen-
centric” instead.
Proposition 6: Embeddedness and cultures
One of the chief learnings from the experiences of the U.S. govern-
ment in the development of e-government has been the strong role of
embeddedness and culture. Embeddedness refers to the fact that
information systems are situated in the context of complex histories,
social and political relationships, regulations and rules, and opera-
tional procedures. It is not a simple matter to change an information
system, therefore, when it is embedded in a complex organizational
and institutional system.
Integration across Agencies: An Example
A marked rise in the use of the Internet, at the beginning of the
1990s, coincided with the beginning of the Clinton administration
and the initiation of a major federal government reform effort, the
Reinventing Government movement, led by Vice President Al Gore.
In addition to the development of regulatory and legal regimes to pro-
mote e-commerce, the administration sought to build internal capac-
ity for e-government. A key strategy of the Clinton administration
included the development of virtual agencies. The virtual agency, in
imitation of web portals used in the private sector, is organized by
client—say, senior citizens, students, or small business owners—and is
designed to encompass within one web interface access to all relevant
information and services in the government as well as from relevant
organizations outside the government. If developed sufficiently, vir-
tual agencies have the potential to influence the relationship between
state and citizen as well as relationships within government among
agencies and between agencies and overseers. 
During the Clinton administration, development of cross-agency
websites floundered due to intransigent institutional barriers.
Oversight processes for cross-agency initiatives did not exist. Budget
processes focus on single agencies and the programs within them.
There were no legislative committees or sub-committees nor were
Central Issues in the Political Development of the Virtual State
163
there budget processes that were designed to support cross-agency, or
networked, initiatives. The government lacked a chief information offi-
cer, or any strong locus of executive authority or expertise, to direct
and manage initiatives lying across agencies and across jurisdictions.
These institutional barriers, as well as others, posed deeper challenges
to networked government than the usual and oft-cited complaints
about resistance to change on the part of bureaucrats. Bureaucrats were
simply responding to incentives, norms, and the dominant culture.
In August 2001, in a continuation of the path toward building inter-
agency capacity (or networked approaches within the state) the Bush
administration released the Presidential Management Agenda. The
complete agenda includes five strategic, government-wide initiatives; this
paper summarizes one of the five initiatives: e-government.
7
The e-gov-
ernment plan, initially called “Quicksilver” after a set of cross-agency
projects developed during the Clinton administration, evolved to focus
on the infrastructure and management of 25, cross-agency e-govern-
ment initiatives. The projects are listed in the table below. (I describe
each project briefly in Appendix One.) The overall project objectives are
to simplify individuals’ access to government information; to reduce
costs to businesses of providing government with redundant informa-
tion; to better share information with state, local and tribal governments;
and to improve internal efficiency in the federal government.
8
The 25 projects are grouped into four categories: Government to
Business, Government to Government, Government to Citizen and
Internal Efficiency and Effectiveness and a project which affects all
others, E-Authentication. Government-to-business projects include:
electronic rulemaking, tax products for businesses, streamlining inter-
national trade processes, a business gateway, and consolidated health
informatics. Government-to-government projects include: interoper-
ability and standardization of geospatial information, interoperability
for disaster management, wireless communication standards between
emergency managers, standardized and shared vital records informa-
164
The Network Society
For further details see “The President’s M
anagement Agenda,” p.24 http://www.white-
house.gov/omb/budget/fy2002/mgmt.pdf.
Jane E. Fountain, “Prospects for the Virtual State,” working paper, COE Program on
Invention of Policy Systems in Advanced Countries, Graduate School of Law and Politics,
University of Tokyo, September 2004. English language version available at http://www.
ksg.harvard.edu/janefountain/publications.htm
tion, and consolidated access to federal grants. Government-to-citizen
projects include: standardized access to information concerning gov-
ernment benefits, standardized and shared recreation information,
electronic tax filing, standardized access and processes for administra-
tion of federal loans, and citizen customer service. Projects focused on
internal efficiency and effectiveness within the central government
encompass: training, recruitment, human resources integration, secu-
rity clearance, payroll, travel, acquisitions and records management.
Also included is a project on consolidated authentication. (For further
information concerning each project see www.e-gov.gov). For a
detailed description of the implementation and management of one of
the initiatives, Grants.gov, an effort to standardize the grants manage-
ment process across several agencies, see Fountain (2004).
9
Table 5.1 1 Cross-Agency,E-Government Initiatives
Government to Citizen
Government to Government
Recreation One Stop
Geospatial One Stop
GovBenefits.gov
Grants.gov
E-Loans
Disaster Management
IRS Free File (IRS only)
SAFECOM
USA Services
E-Vital
Government to Business
Internal Efficiency and Effectiveness
E-Rulemaking
E-Training
Expanding Electronic Tax
Recruitment One-Stop
Products for Business
Enterprise HR Integration
Federal Asset Sales
E-Records Management
International Trade Process
E-Clearance
Streamlining
E-Payroll
Business Gateway
E-Travel
Consolidated Health Informatics
Integrated Acquisition Environment
E-Authentication
Source:http://www.egov.gov
The 25 projects were selected by the U.S. Office of Management
and Budget from more than three hundred initial possibilities. The
plethora of possibilities were in nearly all cases developed during the
Clinton administration and continue outside the rubric of the
Presidential Management Initiative. In al cases, such projects focus
attention on the development of horizontal relationships across gov-
ernment agencies. In this sense, the projects move beyond the first
stage of e-government which typically entails providing information
Central Issues in the Political Development of the Virtual State
165
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested