download pdf using itextsharp mvc : .Net pdf to jpg application SDK tool html wpf azure online JF_NetworkSociety30-part1838

Our focus is on three types of local public Wi-Fi networks, each
driven by different sets of actors and based on different logics of
deployment: wireless cooperatives, small wireless ISPs, and municipal
governments.
Decentralized models of wireless broadband
deployment: Reviewing the evidence
Wireless cooperatives
Some of the most publicized grassroots efforts to provide wireless
Internet access to the public have been led by so-called wireless coop-
eratives. Though wireless
cooperatives come in many colors and flavors, these are generally
local initiatives led by highly skilled professionals to provide wireless
access to the members of the cooperative groups who build them, to
their friends, and to the public in general (Sandvig, 2003).
These for the most part comprise little more than a collection of
wireless access points intentionally left open by these wireless enthusi-
asts and made available to anyone within range, although there are
more sophisticated architectures generally based on backhaul connec-
tions made between these access points. For example, the Bay Area
Wireless User Group (BAWUG) operates long-range connections (2
miles and more) linking clusters of access points, while in Champaign-
Urbana a wireless community group is building a 32-node mesh net-
work that will function as a testbed for the implementation of new
routing protocols.
Wireless cooperatives pursue a wide variety of goals: some simply
provide a forum for their members to exchange information about
wireless technologies, while others are actively engaged in building
wireless networks to experiment with the possibilities of Wi-Fi tech-
nologies, such as the Champaign-Urbana group referred to above.
While the exact number of community networks is difficult to estab-
lish (in large part precisely because these are small community initia-
tives that do not require licensing by a central authority), there are
over 100 documented initiatives in the U.S. alone, each typically rang-
276
The Network Society
Convert pdf file to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpg file; convert pdf file to jpg file
Convert pdf file to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
changing pdf to jpg; .pdf to jpg
ing from a few nodes to a few dozen nodes.
8
Interestingly, many of
these free wireless cooperatives operate in some of the wealthiest U.S.
cities such as San Francisco, San Diego, and Boston. There are also
many individuals (or organizations) who volunteer to open their
access point to the public without necessarily belonging to an organ-
ized cooperative, and advertise this fact on directories such as
nodeDB.com.
Despite much publicity, the assemblage of these community net-
works is today of small significance in terms of the access infrastruc-
ture it provides. Further, it is unclear how many people are effectively
taking advantage of them. In cases where the community organiza-
tions track usage of their open networks, there seems to be relatively
few takers.
9
Anecdotal evidence indicates that the main users of these commu-
nity networks are the wireless community members themselves
(Sandvig, 2003). Nevertheless, these networks are playing an impor-
tant role in the emerging ecology of Wi-Fi. If nothing else, they rep-
resent a clear disincentive for investments in commercial hotspots
operations.
10
Moreover, much like in the case of radio amateurs in the 1910s,
wireless enthusiasts have made significant improvements to the reach
and functionality of Wi-Fi networks, including routing protocols for
mesh networks, authentication tools, and the real-life testing of signal
propagation and interference problems.
11
Somewhat surprisingly, coordination among the various commu-
nity wireless groups has been relatively limited, with different groups
often duplicating efforts in terms of basic access provision over the
same area or development of competing software protocols.
Geeks, Bureaucrats and Cowboys 277
For 
a seemingly thorough listing see http://wiki.personaltelco.net/index.cgi/
WirelessCommunities.
See for example the usage statistics of Seattle-wireless at http://stats.seattlewireless.net.
1010 Verizon cites the availability of free wireless access in several areas of M
anhattan as the
reason why it decided to offer free Wi-Fi access to its existing DSL customers.
11It is interesting to note that the notorious Pringles “cantenna” used by many W
i-Fi enthu-
siasts has a precedent in the history of radio, for early radio amateurs often used Quaker
Oats containers to build radio tuners.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the
change pdf to jpg online; convert .pdf to .jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
changing pdf to jpg on; best way to convert pdf to jpg
However there are recent signs of increased cooperation to pursue
common policy goals (e.g., availability of unlicensed spectrum) as well
as technical cooperation. 
12
There are also grassroots efforts to con-
nect small local networks to share backhaul capacity and exchange
traffic in a mesh-like architecture. For example, the Consume project
is a London-based collaborative effort to peer community Wi-Fi net-
works. The group has developed a model contract for cooperation
called the Pico Peering Agreement, which outlines the rights and obli-
gations of peering parties (in essence, it is a simplified version of exist-
ing peering agreements between Tier 1 backbone operators).
13
Much like in the case of open source software, wireless community
efforts are based on the voluntary spirit of like-minded (and techni-
cally-proficient) individuals who agree to provide free access or transit
across their network. While simple contracts such as the Pico Peering
Agreement might prove useful for peering among small community
networks, more complex financial and legal arrangements are likely to
be needed for scaling-up the current patchwork of community access
points into a larger grid that provides a true connectivity alternative
for those limited technical expertise and for local institutions with
more complex service demands. Yet, while the impact of wireless com-
munity initiatives has yet to match that of the open-source movement,
experimentation with cooperative models for the deployment and
management of WLANs has exciting opened new possibilities for net-
work deployment at the local level.
Municipal governments
A second category of non-traditional actors that are increasingly
engaged in building and managing wireless broadband networks are
municipal governments. This is certainly not the first time in U.S. his-
tory that municipalities are engaged in the deployment of telecommu-
nications networks or the provision of services (see Gillett, Lehr, and
Osorio, 2003). Yet the advances in wireless technologies discussed
above have created a more attractive environment for local govern-
ment involvement in the provision of wireless broadband services,
278
The Network Society
12It is worth noting that the inaugural National Summit for Community W
ireless Networks
was held in August 2004.
13Available at www.picopeer.net.
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
convert pdf file to jpg on; convert pdf to jpg batch
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
.net convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg on
particularly among those communities neglected or poorly served by
traditional broadband operators (notably cable and DSL providers).
The impetus is particularly strong among communities where munici-
pally-owned public service operators are already present—for exam-
ple, among communities with Municipal Electric Utilities—for the
existing resources (such as trucks and customer service and billing sys-
tems) significantly lower the cost of municipal entry into broadband
wireless services. In pursuing these deployments, municipal govern-
ments have a considerable advantage over commercial entities or com-
munity groups: they control prime antenna locations in the form of
light posts and traffic signs, all of which have built-in electrical supply
that can serve to power wireless access points.
The number of cities deploying wireless broadband networks has
been growing very fast in recent years. According to one estimate, as of
June 2004 there were over 80 municipal Wi-Fi networks in the U.S.
and the EU, with more in the planning stages in large cities such as
Los Angeles and Philadelphia.
14
The scale, architecture, and business
models of these municipal networks vary widely. Some municipalities
are simply building so-called “hot zones” (essentially a small cluster of
public access points) along downtowns, shopping districts, and public
parks. By providing free Wi-Fi access, these cities hope to help attract
businesses to these areas, boost customer traffic, or lure conference
organizers to their convention centers by making it easy for confer-
ence-goers to stay connected. This was for example the explicit goal
behind the launch of free Wi-Fi access by the city of Long Beach, CA
in its downtown, airport and convention center areas.
15
A more ambitious model involves generally small municipalities
that seek to deploy citywide wireless broadband to service government
buildings, mobile city workers, security and emergency services. This
is for example the case of Cerritos, CA, a small Southern California
community without cable broadband and only limited access to DSL
services. The city partnered with wireless access provider Aiirmesh to
Geeks, Bureaucrats and Cowboys 279
14Munirewireless.com First Anniversary Report (June 2004). Available at www.muniwire-
less.com.
15Interviews with Chris Dalton, City of Long Beach Economic Development Office,
February 6, 2004 (see also John Markoff, “More Cities Set Up Wireless Networks,” New
York Times, January 6, 2003). It is also worth noting that during our visit to downtown
Long Beach we detected several private access points open for public use.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C# Create PDF from Raster Images, .NET Graphics and REImage File with XDoc Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
batch pdf to jpg; to jpeg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. Turn multipage PDF file into image
convert pdf file to jpg; convert pdf to jpg converter
offer access to local government workers (in particular mobile
employees such as city maintenance workers, code enforcement offi-
cers and building inspectors), while at the same time allowed the com-
pany to sell broadband services to Cerritos’ residents and businesses.
Similar publicprivate partnerships are mushrooming in a number of
small and mid-size U.S. cities, including Lafayette, LA, Grand Haven,
MI, Charleston, NC, and others.
16
A significant number of these municipal networks use a mesh archi-
tecture: rather than connecting each Wi-Fi base station to the wired
network, as in the case of residential access points or commercial
hotspots, devices relay traffic to one-another with only a few of them
hard-wired to the Internet. They are programmed to detect nearby
devices and spontaneously adjust routing when new devices are added,
or to find ways around devices that fail. Municipalities have an inher-
ent advantage in pursuing a mesh architecture since as noted they
control a large number of prime locations for antenna locations, such
as light posts, traffic signs or urban furniture, dispersed through the
city and equipped with power supply. A prominent example is Chaska,
MN, a city of less than 20,000 where the municipal government built
a 16-square miles mesh network and operates the service on the basis
of an existing municipal electric utility.
Municipal wireless networks drew little controversy when confined
to small cities or communities underserved by major broadband oper-
ators, or when these initiatives primarily addressed the needs of gov-
ernment employees. Yet, as soon as larger municipalities announced
plans to build metropolitan area networks (MANs) that would cover
large geographical areas, the debate over the proper role of local gov-
ernments in the provision of wireless broadband erupted, and incum-
bent operators swiftly sought legislation blocking municipal Wi-Fi
projects. 
The theoretical case in favor of local government provision of wire-
less broadband rests on three key assumptions: first, that broadband
access is part of the critical infrastructure for communities to prosper
in economic and social terms; second, that for a variety of reasons
market forces cannot adequately fulfill the demand for broadband
280
The Network Society
16For descriptions of these municipal wireless projects in the U.S. and elsewhere see
http://www.muniwireless.com.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. C#.NET WPF PDF Viewer Tool: Convert and Export PDF.
changing pdf file to jpg; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List in imagePaths) { Bitmap tmpBmp = new Bitmap(file); if (null Use C# Code to Convert Png to Tiff.
convert pdf photo to jpg; change pdf file to jpg file
access within the community (for example, because externalities pre-
vent private operators from fully capturing the benefits of widespread
broadband access); and third, that under these circumstances local
governments can run wireless networks and deliver these services
(either directly or under a franchise agreement) more efficiently than
private firms (Lehr, Sirbu, and Gillett, 2004).
While the first assumption seems plausible, the other two depend
on a number of specific circumstances that prevent overarching gener-
alizations (such as those typically made on both sides of the debate). In
communities underserved by existing broadband operators, there is
clearly a role for local governments to play in spurring the availability
of broadband at competitive prices. This is particularly the case when
other municipal utilities already exist, so that economies of scale and
scope can be realized in the provision of a bundle of government serv-
ices (e.g., electricity, water, broadband). At first glance, the market
failure rationale is less convincing for areas where a competitive
broadband market exists, although even in these cases it is entirely
possible to argue for a limited government role in the provision of
wireless broadband (for example, in running the fiber backhaul, in
specialized applications for government operations, or in conjunction
with economic development projects). Ultimately, a better under-
standing of the potential costs and benefits of municipal wireless ini-
tiatives under different contexts is needed to allow conclusions about
the appropriate role of local government in the wireless broadband
environment.
Wireless ISPs
A third category of new actors taking advantage of the properties of
new WLAN technologies are the Wireless Internet Service Providers
(WISPs.) These are new forprofit companies providing internet serv-
ices to residential and business customer over wireless networks,
including internet access, web hosting, and in some cases more diverse
services such as virtual private networking and voice over IP. Over the
past two years, the FCC has taken a keen interest in WISPs, seeing
them in particular as a way to bring broadband internet access to rural
areas. This regulatory support is further strengthened by rural devel-
opment funding programs, such as the USDA’s Community Connect
Grant Program aimed at providing “essential community facilities in
Geeks, Bureaucrats and Cowboys 281
rural towns and communities where no broadband service exists.”
17
In
November 2003, the FCC held a Rural Wireless ISP Showcase and
Workshop to “facilitate information dissemination about Rural WISPs
as a compelling solution for rural broadband service.”
18
In May 2004,
FCC Chair Michael Powell announced the creation of the Wireless
Broadband Access Task Force, to recommend policies that could
encourage the growth of the WISP industry.
In the U.S., WISPs are present in a diversity of communities rang-
ing from large cities (like Sympel, Inc in San Francisco or Brick Network
in St Louis), to rural towns (like InvisiMax in Hallock, MN). However,
their impact is perhaps most significant in rural and small towns, where
they are often the only broadband access solution. While there is much
enthusiasm about this new segment of the ISP industry, little informa-
tion is available.
19
Different sources cite widely divergent numbers of
WISP providers. In September 2003, analysts In-Stat/MDR estimated
there were “between 1,500 and 1,800 WISPs” in the U.S.
20
During the
Wireless Broadband Forum held in May 2004 by the FCC, Margaret
LaBrecque, Chairperson of the WiMax Forum Regulatory Task Force
claimed there were ”2500 wireless ISPs in the U.S. serving over 6,000
markets.”
21
At the same meeting, Michael Anderson, Chairperson of
part-15.org, an industry association for license-free spectrum users,
said there were “8,000 license-exempt WISPs in the United States
actively providing service”
22
, most of them serving rural areas. The
FCC’s own Wireless Broadband Access Task Force puts that number at
“between 4,000 and 8,000.”
23
While these numbers obviously lack precision, they are also strik-
ingly large. Considering there are about 36,000 municipalities and
282
The Network Society
17See http://www.usda.gov/rus/telecom/commconnect.htm.
18See http://www.fcc.gov/osp/rural-wisp/
19The authors gratefully acknowledge research help from Namkee Park, USC, in tracking
down some of the available information.
20Cited in Bob Brewin, “Feature: W
ireless nets go regional,” CIO, September 14, 2003.
21Transcript of the FCC W
ireless Broadband Forum (5/19/2004), p. 63. Available at:
http://wireless.fcc.gov/outreach/2004broadbandforum/comments/transcript_051904.doc.
22 Ibid. at p. 89.
22“Connected on the Go: Broadband Goes W
ireless,” Wireless Broadband Access Task
Force Report, FCC, February 2005, p.5.
232002 Census of Governments, at http://www.census.gov/govs/www/cog2002.html
towns in the U.S., of which the large majority are small (29,348, or
82%, have less than 5,000 inhabitants; 25,369, or 71%, have less than
2.500 inhabitants)24
24
, and considering that there are several WISPs
serving more than one community (Table 11.1), the coverage that this
new breed of access providers are providing in rural and small com-
munities is remarkably extensive.The small scale of these operators is
illustrated in Table 11.1 While the larger WISPs serve less than
10,000 subscribers, the majority of them are mom-and-pop operations
serving only about 100 customers each.25 This indicates an extremely
fragmented industry structure, largely resulting from very low entry
costs: with an upfront investment as low as U$10,000 in off-the-
shelves equipment, a small entrepreneur can build a system able to
serve about 100 customers, with a payback ranging from 12 to 24
months.
25
In fact, many WISPs have been started by frustrated cus-
tomers fed up with the difficulty of getting affordable high-speed con-
nections in their small communities, and who decide to front the cost
of a T1 connection and spread that cost by reselling the excess capac-
ity to neighbours over wireless links.
26
However, one common prob-
lem is the availability of T1 lines (or comparable) for backhauling
traffic. Unlike urban ISPs, many WISPs have to pay additional long-
haul charges to interconnect with Internet POPs located in major
cities, which raises provision costs significantly. 
The WISP sector is an infant industry, with most players entering
the market in the last three years. The availability of both private and
public financing, coupled with the slow roll-out of broadband by tra-
ditional carriers in most rural and small communities, has fueled the
remarkable growth of this segment. For the moment, there seems to
be significant demand from customers, and ample policy support, to
Geeks, Bureaucrats and Cowboys 283
24Stephen Lawson, “W
i-Fi brings broadband to rural Washington,” NetworkWorldFusion,
08/23/04.
25See for example “How M
uch Does a WISP Cost?,” Broadband Wireless Exchange
Magazine at http://www.bbwexchange.com/turnkey/pricing.asp.
26As Part-15.org Chairman (and CIO of W
ISP PDQLink) Michael Anderson recalls, “I
think most of the WISPS, the licensed exempt guys, the smaller, less than 10 employees,
100 miles from any metropolitan area, those guys, for the most part, started their business
because of the frustration of not having the availability of broadband in their areas, which
makes them either suburban or rural. I think in ’98, ’97, when I started wireless from ISP, I
had the same frustrations. I was paying U$1700 a month for a T-1 at the office and four
blocks away at my home the best I could hope for was a 288kb/s connection.” Transcript
of the FCC Wireless Broadband Forum (5/19/2004), p. 117.
sustain the current growth rates. Yet, at least two factors call for atten-
tion. The first is the entry of traditional wired broadband providers,
such as cable operators and telcos, who in several cases have come to
rural areas to challenge WISPs with lower priced offerings. The sec-
ond is the long-term sustainability of these small-scale operations
which often depend on a few larger customers. In early days of teleph-
ony, grassroots efforts were also critical to extend telecommunications
to rural America, yet after a wave of consolidation in the early 20th
century only a few remained independent (Fischer, 1992). While new
WLAN technologies have similarly spurred a new generation of small
telecom entrepreneurs, it remains to be seen how sustainable these
networks will be in the long run.
Table 11.1 1 “Top 10”Wireless Internet Service Providers
Communities
Headquarters
Wireless ISP
Subscribers
served
Omaha, NE
SpeedNet Services, 
Inc.
7,000
235
Prescott Valley, AZ
CommSpeed
4,579
W.Des Moines, IA
Prairie iNet
4,001
120
Amarillo, TX
AMA TechTel 
Communications
4,000
Erie, CO
Mesa Networks
3,000
_
Moscow, ID
FirstStep Internet
2,709
16
Lubbock, TX
Blue Moon Solutions
2,000
_
Owensboro, KY
Owensboro
Municipal Utilities
1,550
_
Orem, UT
Digis Networks
1,516
_
Evergreen, CO
wisperTEL
1,000
31
Source:Broadband Wireless Magazine (at http://www.bbwexchange.com/top10wisps.
asp, as of 2/23/05) and company data.
Conclusion
David (2002) has aptly described the Internet as a fortuitous legacy of
a modest R&D program which was later adapted and modified by vari-
ous economic and political actors to perform functions never intended
by its pioneers. Wi-Fi has similarly emerged from a rather modest
experiment in spectrum management launched by the FCC in 1985 that
has unexpectedly resulted in the proliferation of local wireless networks
in homes, offices, and public spaces. Much like the Internet challenged
284
The Network Society
traditional telecom networks, with this new architecture comes a new
distribution of control over wireless networks. However fast new wire-
less technologies evolve, this will be an evolutionary process whereby
various stakeholders, not simply equipment manufacturers and incum-
bent carriers but also local governments, start-up providers and espe-
cially endusers, will interact to shape the technology in different ways.
While some battles will be market-driven, other will take place in the
courtrooms, in regulatory agencies, and within standards-setting organ-
izations. Having outgrown their original purpose as an appendix to the
wired infrastructure, Wi-Fi networks now stand at a critical juncture,
for they embody technical possibilities of potentially disruptive charac-
ter, and yet it is in the decisively social realm of economic and political
interactions that their future is being cast.
With tens of millions units sold in just a few years, there is now a
critical mass of Wi-Fi radios in the environment. All signs point to the
continuation of this trend in the coming few years: Wi-Fi devices are
becoming very cheap and embedded in a wide array of consumer
devices, from cell-phones to televisions, appliances and cars. Once
density reaches a certain threshold, the traditional deployment archi-
tecture and models of control will need to be revisited, for the system
is likely to reach capacity as too many devices compete for scarce
resources such as frequencies and backhaul links. This will inevitably
lead to regulatory battles about how to reform the existing legal edi-
fice for wireless communications, largely based on the broadcast
model of a few high-power transmitters connecting to numerous low-
power, limited-intelligence devices. The ongoing debate between
unlicensed vs. property rights-based models of spectrum management
illustrates this point.
One of the central questions for the evolution of WLANs is
whether the large, and fast growing, number of radio devices in the
environment could be coordinated differently to create a fundamental
challenge to existing networks. We believe we are fast approaching a
point where this might happen, because of two related developments.
The first is the bottom-up dynamics associated with Wi-Fi deployment
discussed in this paper. As households, grassroots community groups,
small entrepreneurs and local institutions build their own networks,
the incentives will increase to share resources, reach roaming or peer-
ing agreements, and devise new cooperative mechanisms to manage
Geeks, Bureaucrats and Cowboys 285
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested