2. Communality
Communality is the old value of fraternity (the fraternitéof the
Enlightenment). It means openness, belongingness, willingness to
include other people and to do things together. This value is yet
another foundation of the welfare state. Communality is one of the
most energising experiences of life—being part of a larger community
that shares your interests. It means living together.
4. Encouragement
The realisation of communality is the precondition of encourage-
ment. Encouragement refers to an enriching community whose mem-
bers feel that they can achieve more than they ever could alone. In an
impoverishing community, individuals feel that they are less than they
could be. Encouragement means that you choose to enrich, not to
impoverish, other people when you interact with them.
Encouragement means that you spur people on, including yourself, to
be the best they can and that you give them recognition for their
achievements. Encouragement is actually a form of generosity. It can
be crystallised as follows: “Not wanting to take anything away from
other people; instead, working to make it possible for everyone to
have more.” Other people should not be considered as threats that
must be diminished; instead, they are opportunities that can make the
world richer for us all. This is not a scarce resource in the world—
there is plenty for everyone. The lack of communality and encourage-
ment creates an atmosphere of envy.
5. Freedom
Freedom is also one of our traditional values (the libertéof the
Enlightenment). It includes the rights of individuality: the freedom of
expression, the protection of privacy, tolerance for differences. It
means permissiveness. Freedom can be crystallised as follows:
“Whatever adults do of their own free will is all right, provided that
they do not hurt other people.”
346
The Network Society
Convert multi page pdf to single jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf pictures to jpg; convert pdf pages to jpg online
Convert multi page pdf to single jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
c# convert pdf to jpg; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
6. Creativity
Freedom creates space for creativity, the realisation of your poten-
tial. Creative passion is one of the most energising experiences of life.
Creativity is related to the human need for self-fulfilment and continu-
ous personal growth. It takes different forms in different people.
Restrictions on freedom and creativity create an atmosphere of control.
7. Courage
Courage is a value and characteristic that is required in order to
realise the other values. In the European tradition, courage was con-
sidered to be one of the cardinal values as early as the classical period.
8. Visionariness
Visionariness requires courage and, in the same way as courage, it is
a forward-looking value. In the European tradition, it can be seen as
the continuation of hope, a Christian value. Visionariness refers to
insightfulness, the courage to dream, the willingness to make this
world a better place.
9. Balance
Balance is a type of meta-value: it refers to the balance between the
other values. It means the sustainability of what we do. Since the clas-
sical period, this value also has been called temperance or moderation.
10. Meaningfulness
Meaningfulness is partly based on balance and the other values that
have been described above, yet it is a value in its own right. In the end,
we all want our lives to be meaningful. Thus, the meaningfulness of
development depends on the extent to which development promotes
intrinsic values, such as the classical values of wisdom, goodness and
beauty. Meaningfulness can be crystallised in the following question:
“Will this make my life more meaningful?”
Values can be considered to give life a meaning and make life worth
living. Although the above-mentioned values build on the European
Challenges of the Global Information Society
347
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Using this .NET PDF to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image Both single page and multi-page Tiff image
change file from pdf to jpg on; to jpeg
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
space & pixel depth; Ability to convert single-page images between JPEG How to Convert Single JPEG Image to PNG. Select "Convert to PNG"; Select "Start" to start
convert pdf picture to jpg; convert .pdf to .jpg online
tradition, they are found also in other cultures (the European tradition
is based on the multi-layered values of the Enlightenment, i.e. free-
dom, fraternity and equality; the Christian values of faith, hope and
love; and the values of the classical period, i.e. justice, courage, tem-
perance and wisdom—all values that can be found universally).
The importance of these ten values can be described with the fol-
lowing pyramid, which is often referred to in the description of man’s
psychological needs (e.g. Maslow 1954, 1962).
Figure 15.2 2 The pyramid of values from the psychological
perspective
Visionariness
Courage
Creativity
Freedom
Encouragement
Communality
Confidence
Caring
Fight for Survival
The above description of needs emphasises caring and confidence
as the basic human needs, which form the foundation for the social
needs for communality and encouragement and the needs for freedom
and creativity that are related to self-fulfilment. Courage and visionar-
iness are forward-looking values, while balance and meaningfulness
ensure that our actions have a meaning. Psychological experiences,
which are listed on the right-hand side of the pyramid, show that you
can either move up towards enthusiasm and hope or go down,
through control and envy, towards fear and exhaustion. (This pyramid
can be used for describing not only society as a whole, but also 
its various sectors, such as economy, politics, work, education and
individual people. However, the order in which the values are listed
and the pyramid form of the figure should not be interpreted as a nor-
mative stand on the interrelation between the values.)
348
The Network Society
Hope
Enthusiasm
Independence
vs.control
Esteem
Belonging
vs.envy
Safety
vs.envy
Exhaustion
Balance
Meaning
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
transform & convert various image forms, like Jpeg, Png, Bmp, Gif, and REImage object to single or multi-page Tiff image Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff.
batch pdf to jpg; best way to convert pdf to jpg
JPG to Word Converter | Convert JPEG to Word, Convert Word to JPG
Open JPEG to Word Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; How to Convert Single Word Image to JPEG.
convert pdf image to jpg image; change pdf to jpg file
Key Concepts of Social Development
In practice, if we are to meet global competition by implementing
the above-mentioned development scenario and adopting the values
described above, we must take into account the following key concepts
related to social development:
1. A creative economy
2. A creative welfare society
3. Humanly meaningful development
4. A global culture
The latter part of this review describes the content of these con-
cepts and the entailing value-based actions that must be taken in order
to respond to global trends. The emphasis is largely European,
although many of the issues apply much more largely. 
1. A Creative Economy
Under the pressures of international tax competition and the new
global division of labour, developed countries can only rely on expertise
and creativity, as routine jobs and routine production will not help them
to compete with the cheap Asian markets. Developed countries must
enhance productivity through innovations: creativity will make it possi-
ble to increase added value and improve the efficiency of production.
Spearheads of a creative economy: a stronger IT sector,
culture and welfare
Developed countries must actively look for new areas of economic
activity where creativity can make a difference. Although developed
countries should not be fixated on certain fields only, they will find
new potential in culture and welfare, the major emerging sectors in
the second phase of the information society. Therefore, the creative
economy can be strengthened by examining the opportunities of the
cultural sector (including music, television, film, computer games, lit-
erature, design and learning materials) and the welfare sector (innova-
tions related to the reform of the welfare society, i.e. biotechnology
and gerontechnology, which helps elderly people to live independ-
ently) so that they become new spearheads for the creative economy
in addition to the IT sector. Interaction between IT, culture and wel-
fare will also generate completely new opportunities. The key sectors
of the creative economy are shown in Figure 15.3.
Challenges of the Global Information Society
349
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Ability to preserve original images without any affecting; Ability to convert image swiftly between JPG & JBIG2 in single and batch mode;
convert .pdf to .jpg; .pdf to jpg converter online
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Open JPEG to DICOM Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; How to Convert Single DICOM Image to JPEG.
change pdf to jpg on; convert pdf page to jpg
The two new spearhead sectors have vast potential. For example, the
cultural sector generated a global business of USD 1.1 billion in 1999.
This sum was distributed between the following fields (learning mate-
rials, which constitute an enormous business as such, are not included):
Table 15.1 Cultural Sector Global Business
USD billion
Publishing
506
TV & radio
195
Design
140
Toys and games
072
Music
070
Film
057
Architecture
040
Performing arts
040
Fashion
012
Art
009
Source:Howkins 2001
The welfare sector, which includes health care, medicine, etc., is an
even larger business which continues to grow, for example because of
new biotechnological inventions and population ageing. Europe could
leverage its expertise in this field, for example in public health care, by
exporting it to other regions.
However, success in these areas in the global competition requires
increased investment in national R&D activities (financing of creativ-
ity). The leading countries are soon investing almost 4.0% of their
GNP in these areas, so government decisions along these lines are
required if we are to succeed in the global competition in the near
future. The most important question is how new public investments
are directed: additional financing should be directed to the cultural
and welfare sectors. 
Financing must also be directed to the development of business
models and marketing. Europe, for example, has clear problems at the
end of the innovation chain, which is shown below (in practice, inno-
vation does not progress in a linear fashion; the factors described in
the figure form an interactive network):
Figure 15.3 3 Innovation factors
Innovation ➝Production Process ➝
Product    ➝Business Model ➝Brand
Idea Creativity
Business Creativity
350
The Network Society
C# Imaging - Planet Barcode Generation Guide
bar codes on documents such as PDF, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint and multi-page TIFF. BarcodeHeight = 200; barcode.AutoResize = true; //convert barcode to
convert pdf image to jpg online; .pdf to .jpg converter online
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
Open JPEG to PDF Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; How to Convert Single PDF Image to JPEG.
change file from pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg online
Europe is innovative in terms of products and production processes,
i.e. idea creativity, but less creative in terms of business models and
brand building, i.e. business creativity that helps to transform ideas into
income. Therefore, financing is required in order to promote research
and development (including training) related to business creativity. 
Richard Florida has combined the creative economy with the con-
cept of the creative class. According to him, this rising class consists 
of very diverse groups of people, such as researchers, engineers, writ-
ers, editors, musicians, film producers, media makers, artists, designers,
architects, doctors, teachers, analysts, lawyers and managers. At the
turn of the millennium, the creative class accounted for approximately
one-third of the work force of advanced economies (Florida 2002).
However, we should not confine the creative economy to a single
class of creative professions only, as Florida does. Robert Reich has
shown that interaction-based “personal-service” jobs constitute
another extensive group of jobs in the information society in addition
to the “symbolic analytical” jobs that are similar to those mentioned
by Florida. Service professions indeed form an important factor of the
economy. The creativity of interaction must, therefore, be seen as
another important form of creativity, to which we must pay attention.
Work based on interaction also increases productivity, improves the
quality of work and provides significant opportunities for employment
even for those with a lower education.
In fact, we must understand the creative economy as an idea that
permeates all sectors of the economy. Sectors that have traditionally
been strong remain significant, and even their productivity can be
improved through innovations. Traditional manual skills also require
creativity. The above-described spearhead sectors are part of an econ-
omy that is based on extensive creativity. The sectors of the creative
economy are shown in Figure 15.4.
Encouraging conditions for working 
The success of the above-mentioned economy in the global compe-
tition depends on the degree to which taxation encourages this kind of
activity. If we are to meet these challenges, our taxation system has to
promote work that enhances the common good, i.e. taxation must
promote job creation, entrepreneurship and creativity and thus make
it possible to finance the welfare society.
Challenges of the Global Information Society
351
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Open JPEG to GIF Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; How to Convert Single GIF Image to JPEG.
batch convert pdf to jpg online; changing pdf to jpg
Figure 15.4 4 An economy based on extensive creativity and
expertise
Creative Economy
Strong
Modern
IT
Spearhead
Emerging
Sectors
Culture
Well-being
Etc.
Existing
Sectors
Reformed
Economy Based on Extensive Creativity
& Expertise (services, manual skills, etc.)
It is essential to note that the welfare society is based on the tax rev-
enue generated by work, not by the tax rate. Tax revenue can be gener-
ated only if the system encourages people to work. Although
participation in unhealthy tax competition will not help maintain the
welfare state, it must be pointed out that excessive tax rates can also
undermine the welfare state.
The welfare society is based on the world’s best expertise and work.
The financing of the welfare state depends, first and foremost, on the
achievement of a high employment rate and on society’s ability to
associate innovativeness with positive expectations by applying tax
rates that encourage work. This will make it possible to finance the
welfare society also in the future. A taxation system that encourages
work also acts as an incentive for skilled employees to stay in their
countries and makes it possible to attract skilled labour from abroad;
this will in turn alleviate the problems caused to the welfare state by
an ageing population.
352
The Network Society
Management and work culture in a creative society
The government can, of course, only pave the way for creativity, as
government decisions as such do not enhance creativity. However, it is
important that the system encourages creativity, instead of restricting it.
The same applies to business. In an information society, companies
must provide space for creativity through a management and work cul-
ture that promotes creativity (cf. Alahuhta and Himanen 2003, who
describe this change, for example, from the perspective of Nokia’s expe-
rience; Himanen 2001). The work culture and atmosphere are decisive
factors in an economy where growth is increasingly based on innova-
tions. The managers’ main task is to promote creativity. An increasing
number of companies are adopting a new key principle of management
by setting ambitious goals that generate enthusiasm. Matters related to
work culture will become an important competitive edge.
There is a distinct difference between the industrial society and the
information society. In the industrial society, the bulk of the work
consisted of routine tasks, and the result of work depended largely on
the time that was devoted to it. The old work ethics, according to
which work was an obligation that you just had to fulfil and suffering
was thought to strengthen the character, made economic sense in the
industrial era. In the information society, however, work depends
increasingly on creativity. This means that the industrial work culture
turns against itself also in economic terms: if people feel that work is
nothing but a miserable duty and that the main point is to fulfil
orders, they do not feel a creative passion towards their work, and yet
this passion would make it possible for the company to continually
improve its operations and stay ahead of the competition. The indus-
trial era created a time-oriented management culture that was based
on control, whereas the creative economy requires a result-oriented
management culture that makes space for individual creativity.
This development is connected with the hierarchy of man’s
motives, which was presented above. Whatever we do, we are at our
best when we are passionate about what we do. And passion evolves
when we think that we are able to realise our unique creative talent.
People who have such a passionate relationship with their job have
access to the source of their inner power and feel that there is more to
them than usual. People who feel that their work has a meaning do
Challenges of the Global Information Society
353
not become tired of their work; work fills them with energy and gives
them joy. We can see this phenomenon not only in business life, but
also in any human activity (from learning to science and culture): peo-
ple can achieve great results because they feel that they are able to ful-
fil their potential at work, and this meaningfulness makes them even
more energetic and boosts their creativity. An encouraging atmos-
phere enhances well-being at work and job satisfaction.
In our changing economy, people work more and more in co-oper-
ation with others, so managers must be able to build enriching com-
munities. Managers must set ambitious goals that generate joint
enthusiasm, i.e. they must be able to generate interaction that enriches
the working community instead of impoverishing it. Interactive skills
will bring a key competitive edge.
This development can also be connected to the psychological pyra-
mid of needs. The realisation of creative passion is a powerful experi-
ence, yet equally powerful is the feeling of being part of a community
that shares your interests and appreciates what you do and who you
are. History is full of examples of the power of this phenomenon. For
example, in science and art, where money has never been the primary
motivator, all great achievements have been made thanks to this
power: belonging and being a recognised person. The same power
applies to business at its best.
2. A Creative Welfare Society
As global competition becomes tougher and the population ages,
the maintenance of the welfare state requires its reform. This reform
can be referred to as the building of version 2.0 of the welfare state
which guarantees the future of the welfare society.
The philosophy underlying the idea of the welfare state is that peo-
ple have equal opportunities to realise their potential and are pro-
tected against the random misfortunes of life. This includes equal
access to education, training and health care, etc. The ethics of this
philosophy is that, in principle, everyone could have been born in any
position in society and that any misfortune that someone has to suffer
could have hit anyone. Ethically, the welfare state is based on the
fragility of life and the ability to identify with other people’s fates. It is
based on the ability to imagine that things could just as well be the
other way round: I could be in your position and you could be in
354
The Network Society
mine. This is what caring is all about. A fair society is fair regardless of
the cards that fate has dealt you. In a fair society, your fate does not
depend on the stars under which you were born, i.e. the economic and
social status of your parents. A fair society provides everyone with
equal opportunities in life, thus levelling out haphazard circumstances.
In short, the welfare state is based on caring, which is to be under-
stood in the sense of fairness. To put it more precisely, fairness refers
to equal opportunities, not a mechanically equal distribution of bene-
fits. If individuals are provided with as equal opportunities as possible,
it is only fair that their shares depend on their preparedness to work.
Fairness like this encourages everyone to fulfil their potential.
Regarding the concept of the welfare state, the government is
responsible for providing the equal opportunities and protection. In a
welfare state, this duty is allocated to the government, as the govern-
ment represents the public interests. Although the government is, of
course, not able to fulfil this obligation flawlessly, it is the best alterna-
tive because it is the only democratically controlled body that protects
the interests of all of its citizens. The legitimacy of the government’s
right to levy taxes is largely based on its obligation to maintain the
welfare state: we pay taxes to the government and expect it to provide
us with equal opportunities and protect us.
The purchaser–provider split in the organisation of welfare services
However, we must make a specific distinction in relation to the
concept of the welfare state. The above definition of the welfare state
does not mean that all welfare services should be provided by the pub-
lic sector. The government is responsible for organising (financing)
the welfare services, but they can be provided either by the public sec-
tor, companies or non-governmental organisations. In some areas, the
government should always also remain the provider. But in many
areas, it is useful to separate the purchaser and the provider of the
services from each other. In some cases, services can be provided best
by parties other than the public sector. A more open competition and
co-operation between alternative service providers is in the interests
of citizens (as it guarantees that their taxes are used prudently).
Therefore, it is better to use the term “welfare society” instead of “wel-
fare state.” This is the first important step towards the creative welfare
society: in many areas, the purchaser and the provider should be sys-
Challenges of the Global Information Society
355
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested