Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 304–310
Puri et al. . NT-ProBNP as a Predictor in AMI 309
natriuretic peptide concentrations have been reported as
levels above or below the median value observed in the
population under study, thus permitting a dichotomous
approach to interpretation of the results.
3,8,9,12,14-16,18-20
In the present study the median level of NT-proBNP was
1403 pg/ml with values being higher for STEMI at 1738
pg/ml (mean 2650±2760 pg/ml) than for those with
NSTEMI i.e. 1034 pg/ml (mean 1626±1915 pg/ml). Such
a difference has been earlier reported by Talwar et al.
8
with
higher levels in patients with AMI than in those with
unstable angina, and in patients with STEMI than in those
with NSTEMI, presumably depending on the extent of
myocardial necrosis.
23
Our study further confirmed the
findings that NT-proBNP levels varied according to the
infarct size and in fact even within the subgroups there was
a wide scatter in the NT-proBNP levels presumably based
on the extent of myocardial damage and functional
impairment which directly correlates with adverse
outcomes including mortality. Similar scatter has been
observed in other studies also.
16,24-26
Information is accumulating that NT-proBNP may
provide prognostic information superior to that obtained
from BNP.
3,16,17,19,20,27
In  patients with ACS, proportional
and absolute increase of NT-proBNP exceeds that of BNP,
suggesting that NT-proBNP is a more sensitive marker of
LV dysfunction.
17,28
NT-proBNP measurement as a
prognostic test has a distinct advantage over other currently
available parameters since it is a quantitative test with
precise values and is not operator-dependent, like the 2D
Echo. The test does away with the pitfalls of inter- and intra-
observer variability in quantifying the data obtained. Our
study, like many recent works, measured NT-proBNP
instead of BNP due to its superior predictive value. Our
results for NT-proBNP confirm and extend observations
made regarding the prognostic value of NT-proBNP in
patients with AMI.
There are isolated reports  on the use of NT-proBNP
levels for predicting short-term survival in AMI.
In 2002,
Omland et al.
27
reported a 51-month follow-up of patients
with AMI, 204 with STEMI [median 1034 (390-2076)
pmol/L] and 220 with NSTEMI [644 (217-1507)
pmol/L]. Long-term survivors were found to have lower
median NT-proBNP levels than those who died (442 v. 1306
pmol/L, p=0.0001). The risk ratio of patients with NT-
proBNP above median was 3.9 (95% CI: 2.4-6.5). In a
multivariate analysis, NT-proBNP risk ratio was 2.1.
(95% CI 1.1-3.9). They concluded that NT-proBNP is a
powerful indicator of mortality in patients with ACS and
provides prognostic information above and beyond
Killip class, age, and EF.
15
Bazzino et al.
24
in 2004 reported,
NT-proBNP more than median of 586 pg /ml (range 10 -
74450 pg /ml) as the strongest independent predictor
of in-hospital (OR 1.7, 95% CI: 1.31–2.20, p <0.001) and
180-day mortality (OR 1.67, 95% CI: 1.41–1.99, p<0.001)
in 1483 consecutive patients presenting with NSTEMI.
NT-proBNP significantly added to information given by
TIMI score and ACC/AHA prognostic categories.
Recently Zeller et al.
25
published data of 101 patients
presenting with ACS, having median NT-proBNP of 136
pmol/L and concluded that higher levels of circulating NT-
proBNP are associated with an increased risk of early
cardiovascular events correlating positively with troponin-
T and PURSUIT risk assessment score. Another study by
Galvani et al.
26
in 2004 with 1756 patients which included
both STEMI and NSTEMI patients reported median NT-
proBNP levels of 353 ng/L (107-1357 ng/L). NT-proBNP
was independently associated with 30-day mortality
reported at 6.4% having an OR of 7.0 and heart failure. It
was concluded that measurement of NT-proBNP on
admission improves the early risk stratification of patients
with ACS.
26
In an editorial comment, Mehta
29 
highlighted the
importance of measuring NT-proBNP levels at admission
owing to its  strong predictive value for mortality, and
suggested that since the immunoassay is now
commercially available, it could be utilized in daily clinical
practice.
The results of a recent meta-analysis of available studies
on natriuretic peptides show that  its prognostic value is
similar both at short-term (OR 3.38; 95% CI 2.44–4.68)
and long-term outcomes (OR 4.31; 95% CI 3.77–4.94),
irrespective of whether the patients present with STEMI or
NSTEMI. The meta-analysis concludes that the short-term
prognostic value of NT-proBNP may justify research efforts
toward early interventions in patients with elevated levels
during the acute phase of MI.
24
Cleland et al.
30
stated that
natriuretic peptides have evolved from being fashionable
to useful, to being necessary now.
Results from our study and information from the
aforementioned studies suggests that NT-proBNP
measurement should be integrated into routine evaluation
of all patients with ACS. Although limited by way of sample
size, our study should contribute considerably toward
establishing the role of NT-proBNP as an important
component of a multi marker approach to identify high
risk patients  which include both STEMI and NSTEMI.  Another
pitfall to its immediate implementation in clinical practice is
related to lack of decisional cut-off levels as of now.
Conclusions:  Measurement of  NT-proBNP is a powerful
tool to assess the risk of adverse events including  death in
IHJ-800-05(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:21 PM
309
Convert multiple pdf to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpg for; c# pdf to jpg
Convert multiple pdf to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
conversion pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter online
310 Puri et al. . NT-ProBNP as a Predictor in AMI
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 304–310
patients with ACS.  Information provided by this biomarker
is incremental to that offered by conventional risk markers
in patients with ACS. Since we have demonstrated that NT-
proBNP has a strong predictive value in short-term
outcomes including death, it may be included in a multi
marker approach to identify high risk patients who might
benefit from an aggressive management strategy. This has
practical implications since the demonstration of a high
NT-proBNP which has short-term prognostic value may
also help to identify and justify interventions in the acute
phase.
References
1. Maisel AS, Krishnaswamy P, Nowak RM, McCord J, Hollander JE, Duc
P, et al. Rapid measurement of B-type natriuretic peptide in the
emergency diagnosis of heart failure. N Engl J Med 2002; 347: 161–
167
2. de Lemos JA, Morrow DA. Brain natriuretic peptide measurement in
acute coronary syndromes: ready for clinical  application? Circulation
2002; 106: 2868–2870
3. Richards AM, Nicholls MG, Yandle TG, Frampton C, Espiner EA,
Turner JG, et al. Plasma N-terminal pro-brain  natriuretic peptide
and adrenomedullin: new neurohormonal predictors of left
ventricular function and prognosis after myocardial infarction.
Circulation 1998; 97: 1921–1929
4. Braunwald E. Unstable angina: a classification. Circulation 1989; 80:
410–414
5. Morrow DA, Antman EM, Charlesworth A, Cairns R, Murphy SA, de
Lemos JA, et al. TIMI risk score for ST-elevation myocardial infarction:
a convenient, bedside, clinical score for risk assessment : an intra-
venous nPA for treatment of infarcting myocardium early II trial
substudy. Circulation 2000; 102: 2031–2037
6. Antman EM, Cohen M, Bernink PJ, McCabe CH, Horacek T, Papuchis
G, et al. The TIMI risk score for unstable angina/non-ST elevation
MI: a method for prognostication and therapeutic decision making.
JAMA 2000; 284: 835–842
7. Jacobs DR Jr, Kroenke C, Crow R, Deshpande M, Gu DF, Gatewood L,
et al. PREDICT: a simple risk score for clinical severity and long-term
prognosis after hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction or
unstable angina: the Minnesota Heart Survey. Circulation 1999; 100:
599–607
8. Talwar S, Squire IB, Downie PF, Mccullough AM, Campton MC,
Davies JE, et al. Profile of plasma N-terminal proBNP following acute
myocardial infarction; correlation with left ventricular systolic
dysfunction. Eur Heart J 2000; 21: 1514–1521
9. Redfield MM, Rodeheffer RJ, Jacobsen SJ, Mahoney DW, Bailey KR,
Burnett JC Jr. Plasma brain natriuretic peptide  concentration: impact
of age and gender. J Am Coll Cardiol 2002; 40: 976–982
10. Nakao K, Mukoyama M, Hosoda K, Suga S, Ogawa Y, Saito Y, et al.
Biosynthesis, secretion, and receptor selectivity of human brain
natriuretic peptide. Can J Physiol Pharmacol 1991; 69: 1500–1506
11. Pan J, Fukuda K, Saito M, Matsuzaki J, Kodama H, Sano M, et al.
Mechanical stretch activates the JAK/STAT pathway in rat
cardiomyocytes. Circ Res 1999; 84: 1127–1136
12. Omland T, Aakvaag A, Bonarjee VV,  Caidahl K,  Lie RT, Nilsen DW,
et al. Plasma brain natriuretic peptide as an indicator of left
ventricular systolic function and long-term  survival after acute
myocardial infarction. Circulation 1996; 93: 1963–1969
13. Arakawa N, Nakamura M, Aoki H, Hiramori K. Plasma brain
natriuretic peptide predicts survival after acute myocardial
infarction. J Am Coll  Cardiol 1996; 27: 1656–1661
14. de Lemos JA, Morrow DA, Bentley JH, Omland T, Sabatine MS,
McCabe CH, et al. The prognostic value of B-type natriuretic peptide
in patients with acute coronary syndromes. N Engl J Med 2001; 345:
1014–1021
15. Omland T, Persson A, Ng L, O’Brien R, Karlsson T, Herlitz J, et al. N-
terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and long-term mortality in
acute coronary syndromes. Circulation 2002; 106: 2913–2918
16. Galvani M, Ottani F, Murena E, Oltrona L, Maras P, Tubaro M, et al.
N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide on admission has prognostic
value across the whole spectrum of ACS . J Am Coll Cardiol 2003; 41:
402
17. Pfister R, Scholz M, Wielckens K, Erdmann E, Schneider CA. Use of
NT-proBNP in routine testing and comparison to BNP. Eur J Heart
Fail 2004; 6: 289–293
18. Morrow DA, de Lemos JA, Sabatine MS, Murphy SA, Demopoulos
LA, DiBattiste PM, et al. Evaluation of B-type natriuretic peptide for
risk assessment in unstable angina/non-ST elevation myocardial
infarction. B-type natriuretic peptide and prognosis in TACTICS-TIMI
18 trial. J Am Coll Cardiol 2003; 41: 1264–1272
19. Jernberg T, Stridsberg M, Venge P, Lindahl B. N-terminal pro-brain
natriuretic peptide on admission for early risk  stratification of
patients with chest pain and no ST-segment elevation. J AmColl
Cardiol 2002; 40: 437–445
20.  James SK, Lindahl B, Siegbahn A, Stridsberg M, Venge P, Armstrong
P, et al. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and other risk
markers for the separate prediction of mortality and subsequent
myocardial infarction in patients with unstable coronary artery
disease: a Global Utilization of Strategies To Open occluded arteries
(GUSTO)-IV substudy. Circulation 2003; 108: 275–281
21. Suzuki S, Yoshimura M, Nakayama M, Mizuno Y,  Harada E,  Ito T, et
al. Plasma level of B-type natriuretic peptide as a prognostic marker
after acute myocardial infarction: a long-term follow-up analysis.
Circulation 2004; 110: 1387–1391
22. Galvani M, Ferrini D, Ottani F. Natriuretic peptides for risk
stratification of patients with acute coronary syndromes. Eur J Heart
Fail 2004; 6: 327–333
23. Talwar S, Squire IB, Downie PF, Davies JE, Ng LL. Plasma N terminal
pro-brain natriuretic peptide and cardiotrophin-1 are raised in
unstable angina. Heart 2000; 84: 421–424
24. Bazzino O,  Fuselli JJ,  Botto F,  Perez De Arenaza D,  Bahit C,  Dadone
J. Relative value of N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide, TIMI risk
score, ACC/AHA prognostic classification and other risk markers in
patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes. PACS
group of investigators. Eur Heart J 2004; 25: 859–866
25. Zeller M, Cottin Y, Laurent Y, Danchin N, L’Huillier I, Collin B, et al.
N-terminal proBNP in patients of non-ST elevation myocardial
infarction. Cardiology 2004; 102: 37-40
26. Galvani M, Ottani F, Oltrona L, Ardissino D, Gensini GF, Maggioni
AP, et al.  N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide on admission has
prognostic value across the whole spectrum of acute coronary
syndromes. Circulation 2004; 110: 128-134
27. Omland T, de Lemos JA, Morrow DA, Antman EM, Cannon CP, Hall
C, et al. Prognostic value of N-terminal pro-atrial and pro-brain
natriuretic peptide in  acute coronary syndromes. Am J Cardiol 2002;
89: 463–465
28. Hunt PJ, Richards AM, Nicholls MG, Yandle TG, Doughty RN, Espiner
EA. Immunoreactive amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide
(NT-proBNP): a new marker of cardiac impairment. Clin Endocrinol
1997; 47: 287–296
29. Mehta RH. Perspective on  N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide
on admission has prognostic value across the whole spectrum of
acute coronary syndromes. Curr J Rev 2004; 13: 10
30. Cleland JC, Goode K. Natriuretic peptides. Fashionable? Useful?
Necessary? Eur J Heart Fail 2004; 6: 253–255
IHJ-800-05(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:21 PM
310
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf to jpg c#; convert pdf file to jpg
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
change file from pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 311–318
Tewari et al. . Premature CAD in North India 311
Premature Coronary Artery Disease in North India: An
Angiography Study of 1971 Patients
Satyendra Tewari, Sudeep Kumar, Aditya Kapoor, Uttam Singh,
Ajay Agarwal, BB Bharti, Naveen Garg, PK Goel, Nakul Sinha
Departments of Cardiology and Bio-statistics, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow
Original Article
Background: South Asians, specially Indians, show increased risk for atherosclerosis and have the highest
mortality rates due to coronary artery disease amongst all ethnic groups studied so far. We aimed to find out the
differences in clinical-biochemical and angiographic profile of young patients versus older patients with
angiographically proven atherosclerotic coronary artery disease.
Methods and Results: Group I (n=828) consisted of patients with age above 55 years (mean age: 63.15±5.76
years), group II (n=924, mean age: 49.13±4.25 years) consisted of patients between age 41-55 years and
group III (n=219) consisted of patients with age ≤ ≤  40 years (mean age: 37.37±2.92 years). Among the
conventional risk factors, smoking was significantly more frequent in group III, while diabetes mellitus and
systemic hypertension were more prevalent in groups II and I. Q wave myocardial infarction was more frequently
present in groups II and III. Only about one-third of the entire patient population in the myocardial infarction
group received thrombolytic therapy. Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels
were significantly higher in younger patients (groups II and III), while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was
significantly low in whole cohort but more so in older patients. Single vessel involvement was more common in
group III, while multi-vessel involvement, diffuse disease and fluoroscopic calcium were more common in groups
I and II.
Conclusions: Significant differences were observed in the clinical, biochemical and angiographic profile of
young patients with coronary artery disease as compared to elderly patients. The younger cohort had more
atherogenic lipid profile, higher prevalence of smoking and more frequent single vessel disease. We observed
that total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio was a better predictor of coronary artery disease
as compared to individual lipid levels. (Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 311–318)
Key Words: Coronary artery disease, Atherosclerosis, Risk factors
Correspondence: Dr Satyendra Tewari, Associate Professor
Department of Cardiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical
Sciences, Lucknow 226014. e-mail: stewari@sgpgi.ac.in
A
therosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major
cause of death all over the world.
1
South Asians,
specially Indians, show increased risk for atherosclerosis
and have the highest mortality rates due to CAD amongst
all ethnic groups studied so far.
1
In India, epidemiological
studies have revealed that the prevalence of CAD has
increased from 1.05% in 1960 to about 7.59% in 1990 in
the urban population and from 2.03% in 1974 to 3.70%
in 1995 in the rural population.
2,3
In India, CAD has been
predicted to assume epidemic proportions by the year
2015.
4
Coronary artery disease tends to occur at a younger age
in Indians than in other ethnic groups with more severe
and extensive angiographic involvement.
4
Differences are
observed in the clinical presentation, risk factor profile and
coronary anatomy of young patients who develop CAD
compared with those developing it at an older age.
5-7
Several
studies involving small number of patients have been
conducted previously in this regard but there is dearth of
comparative studies involving large number of patients.
Moreover, there is a lack of uniformity with regard to the
definition of CAD in the young.
8-12
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical
characteristics as well as biochemical and angiographic
features in patients with angiographically documented
atherosclerotic CAD.
IHJ-751-04(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
311
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif Append one PDF file to the end of another one in
pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET framework. Combine scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp
pdf to jpeg converter; convert .pdf to .jpg
312 Tewari et al. . Premature CAD in North India
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 311–318
Methods
Consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography at
our hospital (a tertiary care center) over a period of 4 years
were included in the study. In most of the cases patients
had sustained the primary clinical event elsewhere and
were then referred for further management. We categorized
the patient population in three groups. Group I (n=828)
comprised of patients with age > 55 years, group II (n=924)
included patients with age ≤ ≤  55 years and > 40 years, while
group III (n=219) included patients ≤ ≤  40 years of age. The
subjects were evaluated for conventional risk factors i.e.
smoking, diabetes mellitus, systemic hypertension and
family history of premature CAD.
Risk factors for coronary artery disease: Smoking was
defined as regular smoking of cigarettes / beedies (a local
type of tobacco).  Patients who stopped smoking more than
one year before the onset of disease were classified as ex-
smokers. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed on the basis of
fasting blood glucose levels of >126 mg/dl or a patient
already on anti-diabetic medications. Systemic
hypertension was considered to be present if the patient
was taking anti-hypertensive treatment at the time of
hospital admission or if blood pressure (BP) was recorded
≥  140 mmHg systolic and/or ≥ ≥  90 mmHg diastolic, at least
twice on examination during admission.  A positive family
history of premature CAD was defined as any first degree
relative that had documented CAD below the age of 55
years in males or 65 years in females. For lipid analysis,
samples were obtained after an overnight fast at hospital
admission or after 6 weeks following myocardial infarction
(MI). Samples were analyzed for total cholesterol (TC), high-
density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and for triglyceride
by enzymatic methods (Auto-analyzer; Technicon RA ‘XT’).
Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) was calculated
for subjects with fasting serum triglyceride levels (<400 mg/
dl) according to Friedewald formula
13 
i.e.
LDL-c = TC – HDL-c – (triglyceride/5)
Body mass index (BMI) values were derived from
Quetlet’s formula (weight in kg/height in m
2
). The diagnosis
of CAD was made on the basis of clinical history (typical
angina, history of MI), 12-lead standard electrocardiogram
(ECG) and stress test before subjecting them to coronary
angiography. Patients were characterized according to their
clinical presentation (Q wave MI, non-Q wave MI or only
anginal symptoms). History of thrombolytic therapy was
also obtained in cases of Q wave MI.
Selective coronary angiography in multiple views along
with left ventriculography was performed by standard
technique to define both the extent and severity of disease
and left ventricular (LV) function. Significant CAD was
defined as at least 70% reduction in the diameter of major
epicardial coronary arteries i.e. left anterior descending
(LAD) or left circumflex (LCx) or right coronary artery
(RCA) and their branches, or 
50% luminal narrowing of
the left main coronary artery (LMCA). Patients were
classified as having single vessel, double vessel or triple
vessel disease accordingly. Diffuse lesions were defined as
lesion length > 20 mm or those occupying at least one-
third of the length of the segment (proximal or distal) of
the coronary artery.
14 
Fluoroscopic presence of calcium, if
any, was also recorded.
Statistical analysis: Comparisons of the means were done
by ANOVA test, comparison of proportions by  ‘Z‘ test and
association between attributes using chi-square test.  The
univariate logistic regression analysis was performed to
identify risk factors for MI, and severe disease. The
multivariate logistic regression analysis (stepwise) was
performed taking significant risk factors at univariate
analysis as independent variables to identify the final set of
risk factors. Student Newman Keuls test at p value of <0.05
was used to assess the inter-group difference by post-hoc
analysis. The statistical software used for analysis was SPSS
version 10.0.
Results
Age and sex distribution: There was significant
difference between the groups I, II and III in terms of gender
differences with males more frequently present in younger
population. There was no significant difference among the
groups in terms of BMI (Table 1). Overall, the drug usage
in the population was – aspirin : 88.8%, beta-blockers:
78.6%, calcium channel blockers: 28.4%, nitrates : 90.6%,
and statins : 24.7%. There was no significant difference
among the three groups in term of usage of these drugs.
Risk factor analysis: Conventional risk factors analysis
of whole cohort (n=1971) is summarized in Table 2.
Hypertension was the commonest risk factor being present
Table 1. Demographic profile of patients of three groups
Variables
Group I
Group II
Group III
p value
(n=828)
(n=924)
(n=219)
> 55 years
41-55 years
≤ 40 years
Mean age
63.15±5.76
49.13±4.25 37.37±2.92
-
(years)
Sex: Male
690 (83.33%) ) 834 (90.26%)200 (91.32%) ) <0.0001
Female 138 (16.67%) ) 90 (9.74%)
19 (8.67%)
-
BMI (kg/m2)
25.3±2.60
24.9±2.17
23.7±2.42
NS
BMI: body mass index; NS: not significant
IHJ-751-04(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
312
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
An advanced .NET control able to batch convert PDF documents to image formats in C#.NET. Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png
convert multiple pdf to jpg online; convert pdf file into jpg format
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
.net convert pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 311–318
Tewari et al. . Premature CAD in North India 313
in 50.6%, while 35.0% patients were smoker and diabetes
was present in 30.5% of patients. Family history of pre-
mature CAD was present in 10.4% of patients.
Comparison of risk factors between groups: Nearly
34.78% patients in group I had diabetes compared to
30.73% in group II and 13.24% in group I (p<0.0001)
(Table 3). Similarly, systemic hypertension was more
prevalent in group I patients (59.78% in group I v. 46.96%
in group II and 31.5% in group III, p<0.0001). Positive
family history of premature CAD was more prevalent in
younger population (18.26% in group III v. 10.6% in group
II and 8.09% in group I, p <0.0001). Nearly half of group
III patients were smokers compared to 40.04% in group II
and 26.09% in group I (p<0.0001).
Younger patients had highest TC (196.42±53.0 mg/dl),
highest LDL-c (118.99±40.70 mg/dl) and highest
triglyceride (212.23±104.60 mg/dl) levels ; in comparison,
the older patients (group I) had significantly lower TC
(172.85±37.78 mg/dl, p<0.0001 v. group III), lower LDL
Table 2. Risk factor analysis of whole cohort (n=1971)
Variable
Value
Mean age (years)
53.71±10.01
Smoking
690 (35.0%)
Diabetes mellitus
601 (30.5%)
Systemic hypertension
998 (50.6%)
Family history of premature CAD
205 (10.4%)
Lipid profile (mean±SD)
TC (mg/dl)
178.97±42.14
HDL-c (mg/dl)
30.63±9.22
LDL-c (mg/dl)
109.99±35.09
Triglyceride (mg/dl)
192.09±95.86
TC/HDL-c ratio
6.13
+1.64
CAD: coronary artery disease; SD: standard deviation; TC: total cholesterol; HDL-c:
high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LDL-c : low-density lipoprotein cholesterol
Table 3. Comparative analysis of risk factor profile between the patients in three groups
Risk factors
Group I  (n=828)
Group II (n=924)
Group III (n=219)
p value
>55 years
41-55 years
<40 years
Smoking
216 (26.09%)
370 (40.04%)
104 (47.48%)
Overall <0.0001
Gp I v. II <0.0001
Gp II v. III= 0.04
Gp I v. III<0.0001
Diabetes mellitus
288 (34.78%)
284 (30.73%)
29 (13.24%)
Overall <0.0001
Gp I v. II =0.040
Gp II v. III<0.0001
Gp I v. III<0.0001
Systemic hypertension
495 (59.78%)
434 (46.96%)
69 (31.50%)
Overall <0.0001
Gp I v. II <0.0001
Gp II v. III<0.0001
Gp I v. III<0.0001
Positive family history of
premature CAD
67 (8.09%)
98 (10.6%)
40 (18.26%)
Overall <0.0001
Gp I v. II =0.040
Gp II v. III=0.020
Gp I v. III<0.0001
Lipid profile (mean±SD) (mg/dl)
TC
172.85±37.78
180.29±41.68
196.42±53.00
Overall <0.0001
Gp I v. II <0.0001
Gp II v. III<0.0001
Gp I v. III<0.0001
HDL-c
29.90±8.70
30.69±9.43
33.15±9.70
Overall <0.0001
Gp I v. II= 0.069
Gp II v. III=0.001
Gp I v. III<0.0001
LDL-c
107.13±32.68
110.50±35.45
118.99±40.70
Overall <0.0001
Gp I v. II =0.06
Gp II v. III=0.003
Gp I v. III<0.0001
Triglyceride
177.76±86.00
200.16±100.30
212.23±104.60
Overall <0.0001
Gp I v. II <0.0001
Gp II v. III=0.1
Gp I v. III<0.0001
TC/HDL-c ratio
6.07±1.57
6.16±1.59
6.23±2.08
Overall 0.300
Gp I v. II =0.200
Gp II v. III=0.598
Gp I v. III=0.200
Gp: group; CAD: coronary artery disease; SD: standard deviation; TC: total cholesterol; HDL-c: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LDL-c: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol
IHJ-751-04(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
313
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
control for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif And the PDF document can contain one empty page or multiple empty pages.
change pdf file to jpg online; convert pdf to jpg file
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word control for creating PDF from multiple image formats such Load PDF from stream programmatically in VB.NET.
convert pdf image to jpg; convert pdf pages to jpg
314 Tewari et al. . Premature CAD in North India
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 311–318
(107.13±32.68 mg/dl, p<0.0001 v. group III) and
lower triglyceride (177.76±86.00 mg/dl, p<0.0001 v.
group III). Patients in middle age group (group II)
had significantly higher TC (180.29±41.68 mg/dl,
p<0.05 v. group I), comparable LDL (110.50±35.45 mg/
dl, p=NS v. group I) and higher triglyceride
(200.16±100.30 mg/dl, p<0.0001 v. group I) levels. The
ratio of TC/ HDL was high (more than 6) in all the three
groups; however, there was no significant difference
between the three groups.
The prevalence of dyslipidemia in all the three groups
is summarized in Table 4. Hypercholesterolemia (TC >
200 mg/dl) was seen in 22.94% patients in group I and
30.52% patients in group II, while it was much higher in
group III (40.18%, p<0.0001). More than 75% patients
of groups I and II had HDL-c level of 
< 35 mg/dl as
compared to only 60.73% patients in group III (p<0.0001).
It was also noted that about 60% of patients of younger
population had  LDL-c level 
>130 mg/dl while only
28.68% patients  in group II and 24.27% in group I had
levels 
>130 mg/dl (p<0.0001). Triglyceride levels >200
mg/dl were seen in about 35% of patients in group II and
III while it was significantly less common in group I
(30.19%).
Patterns of clinico-angiographic profile: Clinical
profiles of patients in all groups are presented in Table 5.
Prevalence of Q wave MI was significantly higher in groups
II and III as compared to group I (49.24% in group II and
50.23% in group III v. 43.35% in group I, p=0.001).
Significant difference was observed in the proportion of
patients who were administered thrombolytic therapy
between older and younger population (only 32.86% in
group I v. 35.44% in group II or 36.36% in group III,
p=0.001). Anterior myocardial wall was the commonest
territory involved in younger groups (64.54% in group III
and 66.08% in group II v. 60.16% in group I, p=0.001).
History of stable angina was more prevalent in elderly
population (48.30% in group I v. 41.34% in group II and
40.64% in group III).
Table 6 summarizes the anatomical distribution
of significant coronary atherosclerotic lesions in the
coronary arteries along with disease pattern, LV function
and presence of fluoroscopic calcium. Younger patients
were more likely to have single vessel disease (SVD),
whereas elderly patients (group I) more often had multi-
vessel involvement (p<0.0001). On multivariate analysis,
age (p<0.0001), diabetes (p=0.01) and TC/HDL ratio
(p=0.01) correlated with triple vessel disease (TVD). LAD
artery was the commonest vessel involved in all the
three groups (p=NS). Diffuse disease pattern was observed
more in group I patients while discrete disease pattern was
common in group III (p<0.0001). Fluoroscopic presence
of calcium was seen  more often in elderly patients in
group I and II while it was present only in 13.1% in group
III (p<0.0001).
Risk factors and myocardial infarction: We analyzed
the role of conventional risk factors in affecting the
incidence of MI in the patient population. Amongst
group I patients, 361/828(43.59%) had suffered an MI,
while the corresponding numbers in group II and III were
455/924 (49.24%) and 110/229 (50.23%), respectively
(Table 7).
Prevalence of smoking was found to be significantly
higher in the group III (53.63% in group III v. 45.49% in
group II) and only 32.40% in group I (p<0.0001), while
diabetes mellitus and hypertension were  significantly
higher in the older patients (36.28%, 24.39%, 13.63%
for diabetes mellitus, 52.35%, 41.53% and 30.90% for
Table 4. Comparative prevalence of dyslipidemia in three groups of patients
Lipids (mg/dl)
Group I (n=828)
Group II (n=924)
Group III (n=219)
p value
> 55 years
41-55 years
<40 years
TC > 200
190 (22.94)
282 (30.52)
88 (40.18)
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II <0.0001,
Gp II v. III=0.01, Gp I v. III<0.0001
HDL-c 
< 35
629 (75.96)
692 (74.89)
133 (60.73)
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II =0.25,
Gp II v. III<0.0001, Gp I v. III<0.0001
LDL-c 
> 130
201 (24.27)
265 (28.68)
130 (59.36)
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II=0.004
Gp II v. III=0.02, Gp I v. III<0.0001
Triglyceride >200
250 (30.19)
319 (34.52)
78 (35.62)
Overall 0.05, Gp I v. II <0.0001,
Gp II v. III=NS, Gp I v. III=0.001
Triglyceride >400
18 (2.17)
41 (4.43)
13 (5.93)
Overall 0.0001, Gp I v. II <0.0001,
Gp II v. III=NS, Gp I v. III<0.0001
TC: total cholesterol; Gp: group; HDL-c: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LDL-c: low-density lipoprotein cholestrol
Values in parenthess show percentage
IHJ-751-04(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
314
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 311–318
Tewari et al. . Premature CAD in North India 315
Table 5. Comparative analysis of clinical profile in the three groups
Clinical parameters
Group I (n=828)
Group II (n=924)
Group III (n=219)
p value
>55 years
41-55 years
<40 years
Q wave MI
359 (43.35)
455 (49.24)
110  (50.23)
0.001*
Thrombolyzed
118 (32.86)
162 (35.60)
40 (36.36)
0.001*
Anterior MI
216 (60.16)
302 (66.37)
71 (64.54)
0.001*
Inferior MI
87 (24.23)
109 (23.95)
29 (26.36)
NS
Lateral MI
56 (15.59)
46 (10.10)
10 (9.09)
0.01*
Non-Q wave MI
69 (8.33)
85 (9.19)
20 (9.13)
NS
Anterior MI
36 (52.17)
45 (52.95)
14 (70.00)
0.002
Inferior MI
24 (34.78)
36 (42.35)
5 (25.00)
<0.0001
Lateral MI
19 (27.59)
04 (4.70)
1 (5.00)
0.001*
Angina (stable/unstable)
400 (48.30)
384 (41.34)
89 (40.64)
0.001*
MI: myocardial infarction; NS: not significant. Values in parentheses show percentage
* Significance between groups [I] and [II, III]; no difference between II and III
•  Significance between groups [III] and [I, II]; no difference between I and II
hypertension, in groups I, II and III respectively;p<0.0001).
Lipid profile analysis showed significantly higher TC in
group III (196.98±49.86 mg/dl v. 178.71±40.91 mg/dl
in group II and 169.95±38.93 mg/dl in group I,
p=0.0001) and HDL-c levels in group III (33.40±10.02 in
group III v. 29.45±8.29 mg/dl in group II and 29.77±8.62
mg/dl in group I, p<0.0001) in patients with MI and age
up to 40 years. Mean TC/HDL-c ratio was high in all the
subgroups but had statistical significant difference between
group I and  groups II and III (5.96±1.52 in group I v.
6.32±1.58 for group II and 6.16±1.69 for group III,
p=0.005).
The univariate logistic regression analysis for risk factors
versus MI (as a dependent variable) shows that among the
risk factors, age, male sex, diabetes mellitus, systemic
hypertension, and TC/HDL ratio were  significantly
associated with the occurrence of both Q and non-Q wave
MI  (p=0.01).
Multivariate logistic regression analysis for risk factors
versus MI revealed that age (Exp β 1.38, 95% CI: 0.83-
3.24), diabetes mellitus (Exp β β  1.08, 95% CI: 0.47-2.51)
and TC/HDL ratio (Exp β β  3.18, 95% CI: 1.43-9.25) were
significantly associated with occurence of MI.
Discussion
This study was carried out to delineate the differences in
the clinical-biochemical and angiographic characteristics
of patients in different age groups, in view of paucity of
Indian data in this regard. These differences may play a vital
role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic CAD in the
younger population.
Table 6. Comparative analysis of angiographic profile between the three groups
Variable
Group I  (n=828)
Group II  (n=924)
Group III  (n=219)
p value
>55 years
41-55 years
<40 years
SVD
321 (38.76)
421 (45.56)
134 (61.18)
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II =0.04
Gp II v. III<0.0001, Gp I v. III<0.0001
LAD
204 (63.55)
263 (62.47)
92 (68.60)
NS
Left Cx
59 (18.38)
75 (17.81)
21 (15.67)
NS
RCA
58 (18.06)
83 (19.7)
21 (15.67)
NS
DVD
228 (27.5)
299 (32.35)
51 (23.28)
Overall 0.007, Gp I v. II= 0.02
Gp II v. III=0.02, Gp I v. III=0.06
TVD
258 (31.15)
197 (21.32)
32 (14.61)
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II<0.0001
Gp II v. III=0.01, Gp I v. III<0.0001
LMCA
21 (2.53)
7 (0.75)
2 (0.91)
Overall <0.0001,Gp I v. II =0.004
Gp II v. III=0.53, Gp I v. III=0.11
Disease pattern:
Diffuse
377 (44.46)
389 (42.09)
57 (26.02)
Overall <0.0001
Discrete
451 (54.47)
535 (57.90)
162 (73.97)
Overall <0.0001
LVEF in % (mean±SD)
53.0±11.01
51.3±10.60
52.7±10.80
0.08
Fluoroscopic calcium (%)
45.80
39.24
13.10
Overall <0.0001
Gp: group; SVD: single vessel disease; LAD: left anterior descending artery; NS: not significant; Cx: circumflex; RCA: right coronary artery; DVD: double vessel
disease; TVD: triple vessel disease; LMCA; left main coronary artery; LVEF: left ventricular ejection fraction
Values in parentheses show percentage
IHJ-751-04(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
315
316 Tewari et al. . Premature CAD in North India
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 311–318
Table 7. Analysis of risk factors and biochemical profile of patients with myocardial infarction in three groups
Variable
Group I (361/828)
Group II  (455/924)
Group III (110/219)
p value
Mean age (years)
63.12±5.40
48.77±4.25
37.43
+2.30
Sex: Male
Female
309 (85.59)
428 (94.06)
101 (91.81)
Overall < 0.0001, Gp I v. II<0.0001
52 (14.40)
27 (5.93)
9 (8.18)
Gp II v. III=0.25, Gp III v. I=0.05
Smoking
117 (32.40)
207 (45.49)
59 (53.63)
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II<0.0001
Gp II v. III=0.07, Gp III v. I<0.0001
Diabetes mellitus
131 (36.20)
111 (24.39)
15 (13.63)
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II<0.0001
Gp II v. III=0.009, Gp III v. I<0.0001
Systemic hypertension
189 (52.35)
189 (41.53)
34 (30.90)
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II=0.001
Gp II v. III=0.025, Gp III v. I<0.0001
Family history of premature CAD
24 (6.65)
51 (11.20)
20 (18.18)
Overall 0.001, Gp I v. II=0.016
Gp II v. III=0.38, Gp III v. I=0.001
Lipid profile (mean±SD) (mg/dl)
TC
169.95±38.93
178.71±40.91
196.98±49.86
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II=0.002
Gp II v. III<0.0001, Gp III v. I<0.0001
HDL-c
29.77±8.62
29.45±8.29
33.40±10.02
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II=0.613
Gp II v. III<0.0001, Gp III v. I<0.0001
LDL-c
105.10±32.90
108.11±35.23
121.33±41.61
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II=0.216
Gp II v. III=0.001, Gp III v. I<0.0001
Triglyceride
172.64±75.40
210.05±102.60
210.60±94.50
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II<0.0001
Gp II v. III=0.96, Gp III v. I<0.0001
TC/HDL ratio
5.96±1.52
6.32±1.58
6.16±1.69
Overall 0.005, Gp I v. II=0.001
Gp II v. III=0.342, Gp III v. I=0.239
Dyslipidemia  (mg/dl)
TC >200
77 (21.33)
136 (29.89)
44 (40.00)
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II=0.006
Gp II v. III=0.028, Gp III v. I=<0.0001
HDL-c ≤ ≤ 35
288 (79.77)
361 (79.34)
69 (62.72)
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II=0.043
Gp II v. III<0.0001, Gp III v. I<0.0001
LDL-c ≥ ≥ 130
79 (21.8)
126 (27.69)
45 (40.90)
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II=0.34
Gp II v. III=0.004, Gp III v. I<0.0001
Triglyceride >200
20 (5.54)
182 (40.00)
45 (40.90)
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II=NS
Gp II v. III=NS, Gp III v. I<0.0001
Triglyceride >400
4 (1.11)
20 (4.39)
5 (4.54)
Overall <0.0001, Gp I v. II=0.001
Gp II v. III=NS, Gp III v. I=0.024
Gp: group; CAD: coronary artery disease; SD: standard deviation; TC: total cholesterol; HDL-c: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LDL-c: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol
Values in parentheses show percentages
Our study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital of
Northern India serving an urban and semi-urban
population in the state of Uttar Pradesh as well as adjoining
states. Since all the cases included in the study were of
angiographically proven atherosclerotic CAD, the study
avoided the inclusion of patients with non-atherosclerotic
causes of angina pectoris and normal coronary arteries.
Risk factors: Tobacco smoking is one of the most powerful
modifiable risk factor for the development of CAD in all age
groups.
15
Our data showed that prevalence of smoking was
significantly higher in patients of CAD in younger
population (group III) as compared to older patients. Several
studies in the past have shown higher prevalence of
smoking in younger patients along with a relationship
between smoking and CAD.
6,8
Pais et al.
16
have shown it to
be an important risk factor with a dose-related risk in Indian
patients. Smoking cessation may thus prove to be one of
the most cost effective approach in both primary and
secondary prevention.
Our study confirms previous observations that systemic
hypertension and diabetes mellitus are more common
in older patients with CAD as compared to younger
patients;
6,7,12
family history is a strong independent
predictor of significant CAD.
17
Like other studies,
6,7,12
in our
study, it was found to be significantly high in the younger
age group.
Dyslipidemia is a widely accepted risk factor for CAD.
Although South Asians have been known to have
comparable TC and LDL-c levels compared to Afro-
Caribbeans and Whites, but they do have lower HDL-c and
higher triglyceride levels.
4,16
Our study, in accordance with
other Indian studies, has shown that mean TC in Indian
patients is well below 200 mg/dl;
18
however, mean TC /
HDL-c ratio was significantly higher in our study
IHJ-751-04(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
316
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 311–318
Tewari et al. . Premature CAD in North India 317
(6.13±1.64) as compared to the study by Pais et al.
16
No
statistical significance was observed in this ratio among all
three groups in the present study.
Further, lipid analysis showed significantly higher TC,
LDL-c and triglyceride levels in younger patients along with
higher HDL-c in the younger age group as compared to
older age persons (though mean HDL-c was < 35 mg/dl in
all groups). Prevalence of hypercholesterolemia was also
significantly high in group III (40.18%) as compared to
group I (22.94%) and group II (30.52%) (p<0.0001) (Table
4). Jayachandran et al.
9
in their study of young Indian
patients also showed the comparable prevalence of
hypercholesterolemia as 43%. When the whole study
cohort was analyzed for the risk factors, mean TC level was
well below 200 mg/dl but TC/HDL ratio was high, which
was an important finding in our whole cohort.
Hughes et al.
19
showed that relative risk of MI correlates
directly with triglyceride and inversely with HDL-c levels
in both Caucasians and Asians Indians. Kaul et al.
20
have
found inverse corelationship between thrombus formation
and HDL-c levels, with enhanced platelet-dependent
thrombus at low HDL-c levels and vice-versa. Bittner et al.
21
have also observed the lower prevalence of Q wave MI on
ECG in the subgroups of the patients with high HDL-c (>60
mg/dl). Precise mechanisms through which systemic
hypertension induces MI have not been investigated
thoroughly but Rakugi et al.
22 
have observed that LV
hypertrophy and progression of atherosclerosis secondary
to systemic hypertension are major factors linking
hypertension and MI.
Our study has shown a statistically significant
relationship between systemic hypertension (on multi-
variate analysis) and occurrence of MI.
Clinical profile: Acute clinical presentation with MI was
found to be more common in younger age groups
(p<0.0001) as also observed by other authors.
7
One-third
of the total population actually received thrombolytic
therapy, though the incidence of thrombolysis was higher
in the younger cohort (36.36% v. 32.86% for group III and
I, respectively, p=0.001). This reflects the need to re-
organize our health care delivery systems in imposing the
management of acute MI. Awareness program along with
infrastructural network for rapid transport of patient to the
coronary care unit must be stressed upon in the developing
countries. Anterior MI was the commonest type of MI in
all groups as was also shown in other studies.
7,8
Angiographic profile: The high incidence of single vessel
involvement and greater frequency of LAD artery
involvement was consistent with previous studies.
10
Dhawan and Bray
14
observed the higher prevalence of non-
discrete (diffuse) lesions in Indian patients (mean age: 50
years) as compared to Caucasians. Our study has also
showed high prevalence of diffuse lesions in older patients,
while discrete lesions were more common in younger
patients (p<0.001). Fluoroscopic presence of calcium in
both the groups was in accordance with a previous study.
10
Predictors of angiographic severe (triple vessel)
disease: On univariate analysis, patient age, history of
diabetes, hypertension and TC/HDL-c ratio correlated with
presence of angiographically proven TVD. Interestingly,
none of the individual lipid parameters i.e. TC, HDL, LDL
and triglyceride correlated with presence of TVD. On
multivariate analysis, age (p<0.0001), diabetes (p=0.01)
and TC/HDL ratio (p=0.01) correlated with TVD. We
highlight the fact that in view of normal TC and LDL in our
Indian cohort (178.97±42.14 mg/dl and 109.99±35.09
mg/dl in our series), TC/HDL ratio may be a better predictor
of severity of CAD.
Conclusions: We observed that the frequency of young
CAD (age
<40 years) in angiographically proven disease is
not uncommon in our country, being seen in approximately
10% of patients. Though these patients had lower
prevalence of diabetes and hypertension, smoking and
family history of premature CAD was more common in
comparison to older patients. Overall the patient population
had lower TC and LDL-c levels (as compared to what is
reported in Western literature) and high triglyceride and
low HDL-c levels. Younger patients had a more atherogenic
lipid profile as reflected by higher TC, LDL-c and triglyceride
levels. The angiographic profile also varied with age, with
older patients having more diffuse disease and higher
frequency of TVD. Amongst predictors of either TVD or
sustaining MI, diabetes and TC/HDL-c ratio were the
strongest predictors.
References
1. Kuppuswamy V, Gupta S. Coronary heart disease in South Asians.
Practitioner 2003; 247: 181–182
2. Gupta R, Gupta VP. Meta-analysis of coronary heart disease
prevalence in India. Indian Heart J 1996; 48: 241–245
3. Chadha SL, Radhakrishnan S, Ramachandran K, Kaul U, Gopinath
N. Epidemiological study of coronary heart disease in urban
population of Delhi. Indian J Med Res 1990; 92: 424–430
4. Enas EA, Yusuf S, Mehta JL. Prevalence of coronary artery disease
in Asians Indians. Am J Cardiol 1992; 70: 945–949
5. Stokes J 3rd, Kannel WB, Wolf PA, Cupples LA, D’Agostino RB. The
relative importance of selected risk factors for various manifestations
of cardiovascular disease among men and women from 35-64 years
old: 30 years of follow-up in the Framingham study. Circulation 1987;
75: V65–V73
IHJ-751-04(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
317
318 Tewari et al. . Premature CAD in North India
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 311–318
6. Uhl GS, Farrell PW. Myocardial infarction in young adults: risk factors
and natural history. Am Heart J 1983; 105: 548–553
7. Chen L, Chester M, Kaski JC. Clinical factors and angiographic
features associated with premature coronary artery disease. Chest
1995; 108: 364–369
8. Gupta SR, Gupta SK, Reddy KN, Moorthy JS, Abraham KA. Coronary
artery disease in young Indian subjects. Indian Heart J 1987; 39: 284–
287
9. Jayachandran R, Sathyamurthy I, Subramanyam K, Ramachandran
P, Jhansi MS, Girinath MR, et al. Coronary artery disease in young.
Indian Heart J 1987; 39: 21–23
10. Sharma SN, Kaul U, Sharma S, Wasir HS, Manchanda SC, Bahl VK,
et al. Coronary arteriographic profile in young and old Indian
patients with ischaemic heart disease: a comparative study. Indian
Heart J 1990; 42: 365–369
11. Jalowiec DA, Hill JA. Myocardial infarction in the young men and in
women. Cardiovasc Clin 1989; 20: 197–206
12. Zimmerman FH, Cameron A, Fisher LD, Ng G. Myocardial infarction
in young adults: angiographic characterization, risk factors and
prognosis (Coronary Artery Surgery Study Registry). J Am Coll Cardiol
1995; 26: 654–661
13. Friedewald WT, Levy RI, Fredrickson DS. Estimation of the
concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in plasma,
without use of preparative ultracentrifuge. Clin Chem 1972; 18: 499–
502
14. Dhawan J, Bray CL. Angiographic comparison of coronary artery
disease between Asians and Caucasians. Postgrad Med J 1994; 70:
625–630
15. Farmer JA, Gotto AM. Dyslipidemia and other risk factors for
coronary artery disease. In: Braunwald E (ed), Heart Disease. A
Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 5th ed. Philadelphia: WB
Saunders, 1997, pp 1126–1160
16. Pais P, Pogue J, Gerstein H, Zachariah E, Savitha D, Jayprakash S, et
al. Risk factors for acute myocardial infarction in Indians: a case-
control study. Lancet 1996; 348: 358–363
17. Grech ED, Ramsdale DR, Bray CL, Faragher EB. Family history as an
independent risk factor of coronary artery disease. Eur Heart J 1992;
13: 1311–1315
18. Krishnaswami V, Radhakrishnan T, John BM, Mathew A. Pattern of
ischaemic heart disease: a clinical study. J Indian Med Assoc 1970;
55:153–57.
19. Hughes LO, Wojciechowski AP, Raftery EB. Relationship between
plasma cholesterol and coronary heart disease in Asians.
Atherosclerosis 1990; 83: 15–20
20. Kaul U, Dogra B, Manchanda SC, Wasir HS, Rajani M, Bhatia ML.
Myocardial infarction in young Indian patients: risk factors and
coronary arteriographic profile. Am Heart J 1986; 112: 71–75
21. Bittner V, Simon JA, Fong J, Blumenthal RS, Newby K, Stefanick ML.
Correlates of high HDL cholesterol among women with coronary
heart disease. Am Heart J 2000; 139: 288–296
22. Rakugi H, Yu H, Kamitani A, Nakamura Y, Ohishi M, Kamide K, et
al. Links between hypertension and myocardial infarction. Am Heart
1996; 132: 213–221
IHJ-751-04(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
318
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested